Kelley Walker

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The art of Kelley Walker is rooted in the idea of social, physical and historical disaster and distress. The artist often appropriates iconic images from the media, including photos of ’60s race riots, plane and car wrecks and modern advertising and magazine covers. All of the images are disrupted by the artist’s use of violently splattered and abstracted patterns, usually scanned and printed from commercial items such as toothpaste and chocolate. These gestures, on top of such weighted images, offer a contrast that infuses adversity with pop culture and consumerism. Walker has had a brief, but significant, career that started in 2003 with his first solo exhibition with Paula Cooper Gallery in New York City. That continued to the exhibition “USA Today” in fall of 2006 that featured new American Art from The Saatchi Gallery and The Royal Academy of the Arts in London. In 2005, Walker exhibited “Crash/Cars” with the Museo de Arte Contemporanea (MARCO) in Vigo, Spain, and “Pictures Are the Problem” at Pelham Art Center in Pelham, New York. The artist has been featured in ArtForum (2004) and was reviewed by The New York Times.

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