June, 2011

Venice Biennale: Hajnal Németh at the Hungarian Pavilion

Memory is deeply connected to the senses, far beyond the linear nature of storytelling. Words are often the farthest from the real “truth” of a scenario, leaving space for memory and imagination to take place. Sight and sound, smell and touch fill in the gaps that words cannot describe, and it is at this brink that Hajnal Németh’s installation CRASH – Passive Interview rests. Exhibited[…..]

Venice Biennale: Thomas Hirschhorn at the Swiss Pavilion

Navigating through Venice in the off season can be challenging, but trying to move through hot, narrow streets and massive crowds of people during the Venice Biennale is completely dizzying. Illuminations, the 54th Venice Biennale, was the largest and most comprehensive to date with 89 national participants alongside 37 collateral events arranged by international organizations and institutions.  As usual, the exhibition spread liberally over Venice’s[…..]

Counter-invasion: Stephanie Syjuco at Catharine Clark

Over a lifetime of visiting museums, you learn that all souvenirs have a price point, from the dollar-fifty commemorative postcard to the pieces in the collection itself.  These prized mementos, selected, brought home, catalogued and displayed, represent the collector’s forays to classical or far-flung sites. My favorite disruption to this cycle is a hall of life-sized plaster casts of classical Greek and Roman architecture at[…..]

From the DS Archives: Spencer Finch

This Sunday, From the DS Archives invites you to check out a recent commission by American artist, Spencer Finch. Finch is one of the 19 international artists selected to create a commission for the Folkestone Triennial, opening June 25th and just an hour away from London by train. For his commission, titled The Colour of Water, Finch observed the varying tone and color of the[…..]

Interview with Glenn Adamson

Today’s interview is from our friends at Art Practical, where Bean Gilsdorf gets a chance to chat with Glenn Adamson, deputy head of research and head of Graduate Studies at the Victoria and Albert Museum, where he leads a graduate program in the History of Design. My interest in Glenn Adamson’s work began in 2006 with his essay “Handy-Crafts: A Doctrine,” which is included in[…..]

Most Beautiful Boy

L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast A weekly column by Catherine Wagley Sometimes, an artist strikes a chord with his contemporaries, and affection for him ripples through culture more distinctly and effusively than anything he’s actually made.  Paul Thek was that kind of artist, perhaps better suited to being a muse than to having one. Homages began coming his way before he’d cleared thirty-five[…..]

Margie Livingston: The Archaeology of Practice

There is a well-worn narrative of twentieth century painting that goes like this: From Cezanne to Picasso to Pollock, the illusionistic space of painting flattened more and more until the picture plane and the surface created by the paint itself became the primary subject matter, eliminating images altogether in favor of abstraction. While this teleology has some merit, the purity of the story is incomplete.[…..]