July, 2013

Postscript: An Ambitious Take on Conceptual Art and Writing at the Power Plant

Kenneth Goldsmith, Soliloquy, 1996.

Upon entering Toronto’s Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery to see Postscript: Writing After Conceptual Art, the viewer is immediately confronted by a raucous wash of sonorous elements. Over fifty artists and conceptual writers occupy the gallery space; canonical works from Andy Warhol, Sol LeWitt, Marcel Broodthaers, Carl Andre, and Dan Graham are nestled among pieces by contemporary practitioners, contributing to the sense of saturation. Originally curated[.....]

Supertheory of Supereverything: Interview with Eric William Carroll

GUT FEELING Installation Photos-5 RE-EDIT

Like many in the scientific community, Eric William Carroll is searching for an ultimate theory of everything, but he’s doing so in a slightly different way. For G.U.T. Feeling, the current exhibition at Highlight Gallery, Carroll utilized aspects of the scientific method in combination with personal associations to create a series of collages, photographs, and sculptures that expose the unexpected, overlooked, and sometimes comically dubious connections in[.....]

#Hashtags: Photographing the Invisible: LaToya Ruby Frazier at Brooklyn Museum

Huxtables, Mom, and Me

#visibility #labor #institutions #class #race #access Photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier makes her New York solo debut with A Haunted Capital, a tightly crafted, personal-is-political installation at the Brooklyn Museum. The artist’s hometown of Braddock, a forgotten steel mill town in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, is marked by a geography of postindustrial degradation. An outsider might take a social documentary approach to Braddock’s history and current woes. As an insider, Frazier documents that[.....]

Dr. Bob in New Orleans

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Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses (250–400 words) to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Eva Morgenstein considers the artwork of New Orleans–based Dr. Bob. Tucked away in the Bywater district of New Orleans, Dr. Bob’s Folk Art condenses the city’s[.....]

What are We Saying?: Electronic Pacific at SOMArts

As part of our ongoing partnership with KQED Arts, today we bring you a review of  Electronic Pacific at SOMArts in San Francisco. Author Roula Seikaly notes that the exhibition provides, “a moment to consider what we say, how we say it, and to whom, as globalization propels us toward an uncertain future.” This review was originally published on July 24, 2013. In the trailer for his[.....]

Queens Nails is Dead at Queens Nails Gallery

When confronted with endings, we mourn and ultimately accept. We feel some mix of disappointment and satisfaction that we were there before it ended, excitement that it happened, and sometimes relief that it is over. Queens Nails is Dead is the last exhibition for Queens Nails Gallery, an artist-run nonprofit gallery that opened in San Francisco’s Mission District in 2004. Featuring the work of Daniel[.....]

Formal Collapse: No Name at On Stellar Rays

(From left to right) Michael Mahalchick. Flag, 2013. Newspaper, bacon fat, pigment, brushes, tacks, Savarin coffee can; 43 x 78 x 10 in. Susan Collins. Long Fallen Wide, 2013. Poplar, tulipwood, maple, beech, white holly, crushed malachite, beeswax, oxidized silver, white gold, bronze, garnet, amber; 71 x 5 x 5 in. Shamus Clisset, SWASS (Long Charm), 2012. C-print; 80 x 56 1/2 in. Nathaniel Robinson. Heap, 2013. Pigmented polyurethane resin, acrylic paint; dimensions variable. Bayard. President Balances National Budgie, 2008. Mohair; dimensions variable. Sterling Allen. Untitled, 2013. Ribbons, pushpins; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artists and On Stellar Rays.

No Name, the group show currently on view at Lower East Side gallery On Stellar Rays, is a theory-based project that develops a collaborative scene of  “gestures, memories and detritus.” The show presents a collection of objects that are incoherent, elusive, and laden with a mysterious personal logic. The work demonstrates a strong theoretical basis, drawing primarily from Judith/Jack Halberstam’s advocation of failure as a[.....]