July, 2013

Perchance to Dream at Andrea Meislin Gallery

Adi Nes, Untitled, 1999 Digital C-print

Perchance to Dream, a group exhibition on view at New York’s Andrea Meislin Gallery, features twenty-five international artists’ photographs that relate to the Shakespeare quote referenced in the show’s title. We see napping children, embracing couples in bed, homeless men on the street, passed-out teenagers on the beach, and even an abandoned, sleeping dog. We also see the strange addition of soiled and torn mattress “landscapes,” presented[…..]

Sturtevant: Leaps Jumps and Bumps at Serpentine Gallery

Sturtevant. Sex Dolls, 2011; installation view, Sturtevant: Leaps Jumps and Bumps, 2013; Courtesy Serpentine Gallery, London. Photo: Jerry Hardman-Jones

It’s nearly impossible to talk about a show of Sturtevant’s work and have it understood. Like a book, you have to start at the beginning. The key to Sturtevant is context. In 1964’s New York City, Elaine Sturtevant sent shock waves through the art world when she started making replicas of the work of her contemporaries. For this, she received a tremendous amount of crap. The[…..]

#Hashtags: Punk Is Dead, Long Live Punk

27. Gallery View_430 Kings Road Period Room

#punk #institutions #historicity #commerce #style Is the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Punk: Chaos to Couture the death knell of punk as a social and cultural movement? Certainly, the Met’s assertion that the locus of punk’s importance is in its influence on high fashion would indicate that it is no longer relevant to these larger concerns. The A-list attendees at May’s opening gala were decidedly mainstream[…..]

Summer of Utopia: March My Darlings

Because it’s summer and we are either dreaming of or living in a haze of heat, sun and (hopefully) minimal clothing, this week we bring you an article from the DS week-long series “Summer of Utopia” which was featured in July of 2010. The post was written by Catherine Wagley as a part of her weekly column L.A. Expanded. The subjects of Ms. Wagley’s entry[…..]

No Portraits: A bizarre tribute to Joseph Beuys, Frida Kahlo, Stelarc, Orlan, and other artists

Guillermo Gómez-Peña. No Portraits: Not James Luna, 2012, from the No Portraits photo-performance series. Courtesy of La Pocha Nostra, San Francisco. Photo: Jen Cohen.

As part of our ongoing partnership with Art Practical, today we bring you the work of writer and performance artist Guillermo Gómez-Peña. The original introduction to the piece explains, “A native of Mexico City, Gómez-Peña has created pioneering work in performance, video, radio, installation, poetry, journalism, and cultural theory that explores cross-cultural issues, immigration, the politics of language, ‘extreme culture,’ and new technologies.” He is also[…..]

Parkett: 220 Artist Editions and Collaborations since 1984 at Taipei Fine Art Museum

Parkett: 220 Artist Editions and Collaborations since 1984, 2013; installation view, Taipei Fine Art Museum.

Currently on view at Taipei Fine Art Museum, Parkett: 220 Artist Editions and Collaborations since 1984 is the 10th edition of international art journal Parkett’s traveling retrospective. Since its debut at the Museum of Modern Art in 2001, the exhibition has toured across the globe via a network of museums spaces including London’s Whitechapel Art Gallery, Singapore’s Tyler Institute, and Beijing’s Ullens Center of Contemporary Art.[…..]

The Transcendental Trash of Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt

Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt. The Fountain of Youth (Spritzer Thaw), 1969; Aluminum foil, plastic wrap, pipe cleaner, holographic tape, glitter, staples, mirror, colored marker; 13 x 10 x 9 in. Courtesy of the artist and Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York.

Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt makes kitsch from the kitchen, using everyday materials such as cellophane, glitter, foil, and Easter-display grass to construct minutely detailed and coded ephemera that sanctify camp, trash, and a kind of queer sentimentality particular to the artist’s experience of the 1970s Hell’s Kitchen scene in New York. Ecce Homo, Pavel Zoubok Gallery’s current three-part exhibition, orbits around this artist’s counter-historical queer aesthetic. On the heels of his extensive[…..]