San Francisco

SFMOMA Is On the Go: Five Reasons to Track It Down

As part of our ongoing partnership with KQED, today we bring you a look at how SFMOMA is continuing to produce exhibitions and events even though the museum will be closed until 2016. While there’s no denying that this is a hardship for San Francisco’s art community, it’s also an opportunity for SFMOMA to become a more flexible institution that works beyond the boundaries of its own physical space. Indeed, it is taking up the challenge of what a museum can be and do. This article was written by Michele Carlson and originally published on August 22, 2013.

Jeremy Blake. Century 21 (video still), from the Winchester trilogy, 2002–4; Collection of SFMOMA.

Jeremy Blake. Century 21 (video still), from the Winchester trilogy, 2002–4; Collection of SFMOMA

SFMOMA’s doors may have closed, but nothing about the museum is departed. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. The $610 million renovation and expansion plan will double the museum’s current size, in part, to accommodate the new acquisition of Doris and Donald Fisher’s private collection of more than 1,100 works. SFMOMA won’t reopen again until 2016, which begs the question, where will all that art go?

Instead of hiding their extensive collection in storage, around 29,000 works of art, SFMOMA is partnering with a plethora of outside cultural institutions and cities, along with a substantially beefed-up digital component, to launch an aggressive campaign to keep SFMOMA alive for its loyalists. In all certainty, by closing its doors, SFMOMA is more open and accessible than ever. Here are five things to look forward to:

Read the full article here.

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