September, 2013

From the Archives: HELP DESK, Flirtatious Collectors & Young Curators

Rob Swainston, Triumphal Arch, 2007. Installation

Bean Gilsdorf is on the road this week—look for her reports from Krakow and Warsaw in October—so today we bring you a reprint of a column from July 23, 2012. Submit your questions to HELP DESK anonymously here: http://bit.ly/132VchD. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. HELP DESK is co-sponsored by KQED.org. I work for a commercial gallery space and have been approached by[.....]

Ryan McGinley: YEARBOOK at Ratio 3

Ryan McGinley. YEARBOOK, Installation view, Courtesy the artist and Ratio 3.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses (250–400 words) to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Danica Willard Sachs reviews Ryan McGinley’s YEARBOOK at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. For his latest project, YEARBOOK (2013), Ryan McGinley has wallpapered the interior of Ratio 3 from[.....]

A Rose Has Bite

Bruce Nauman. From Hand to Mouth, 1967; wax over cloth; 28 x 10.13 x 4 in.

As part of our ongoing partnership with Art Practical—and to celebrate its new website—today we bring you an article that considers the exhibition A Rose Has No Teeth: Bruce Nauman in the 1960s. Written by Leigh Markopoulos and originally published on September 11, 2013, the article looks at Nauman’s exhibition, its legacy, and the questions it raises for the future. Markopoulos asks, “If we accept that[.....]

Fan Mail: PUTPUT

Objective Ambition #1, 2012; sculpture; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

PUTPUT is the Swiss and Danish artist duo of Stefan Friedli and Ulrik Martin Larsen. Though they primarily work in photography, their medium seems secondary—it’s merely the most effective form for documenting their work. The duo re-imagines objects and captures eccentric still-life setups, photographs, and object re-imaginings that open up an entire world of potential visual and sculptural combinations. The objects they create range from[.....]

Pattern Recognition at MoCADA

Pattern Recognition, currently on view at Brooklyn’s Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts, focuses primarily on the paradox of explaining abstract painting. Though designed as a straightforward, contemporary group show featuring new work from established artists, Pattern Recognition must be viewed within the context of a museum whose focus is on community dialogue and education. The hand of Dexter Wimberly, the independent curator behind the[.....]

Lick ’Em by Smiling: Jeremy Deller and Shary Boyle at the Venice Biennale

If the Venice Biennale is the United Nations of contemporary art, then the Giardini is its Security Council. The park’s stately pavilions belong to the (mostly European) nations that were best situated to claim them in the early- to mid-twentieth century. National pavilions are organized by state entities and can be counted on to present a government-sanctioned view of art, which tends toward the conceptually[.....]

Long Ago and Not True Anyway at Waterside Contemporary

Mekitar Grabedian, MG, 2006 (still); Video; 2:05. Courtesy of Waterside Contemporary, London.

In Long Ago and Not True Anyway at Waterside Contemporary, curator Pierre d’Alancaisez explores a kind of history that exists beyond the dry material of archives, records, and established national narratives. Instead, in this small London gallery nearly hidden around a corner among Islington’s high-density residential buildings, this exhibition’s artists and artworks blur the borders between uncertain subjective experience and the history it inhabits. Taking[.....]