October, 2013

Fan Mail: Darren Jones

Darren Jones. Deeper Understanding, 2008; Broken computer, additional and rearranged keyboard keys; 11 x 17 x 11 in. Courtesy the artist.

Darren Jones works across a wide range of forms and subjects, often displaying an adroit sense of humor in his installations, sculptures, digital images, and text based artworks. However, Jones’s work is not only a series of well-pitched interventions and re-arrangements; there is a poetic and delicate seriousness that complicates much of what he makes. Deeper Understanding (2008) turns his old broken laptop, stuck in[…..]

Séripop: Looming at YYZ

IMG_9047(M)

I first came across Montréal artist duo Séripop (Chloe Lum and Yannick Desranleau) a number of years ago when I was more embedded in the indie music scene here in Canada. In this sphere, the pair are known for their layered, DIY gig posters and refreshingly offbeat graphic design work. Despite their disregard for the formal rules of graphic design, Lum and Desranleau possess an intuitive[…..]

Camille Henrot: Cities of Ys at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Camille Henrot. Cities of Ys, 2013 installation view. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Kamel Mennour

French video artist Camille Henrot creates parallels between the mythical and the contemporary. In her first solo exhibition in the United States at the New Orleans Museum of Art, she investigates the legendary city of Ys in France and the vanishing coastal area of southern Louisiana that is occupied by the ancestral Houma Indians. Coastal erosion, in real and mythical tales, is at the heart[…..]

#Hashtags: Divide//Conquer: Artists Confront the Gentrification of Urban Space

Mail Order Brides/M.O.B. (Jenifer Wofford, Reanne Estrada, Eliza Barrios). Manananggoogle, 2013. Multimedia installation including website and photographs. Commissioned by the San Jose Museum of Art with support from The James Irvine Foundation and MetLife Foundation.

#gentrification #displacement #race #class #technology #industry #neo-colonialism Any conversation among artists these days is bound to turn to the question of gentrification—the process of urban renewal by private developers that ultimately displaces poor residents in favor of the upwardly mobile. Modernism in art has always accompanied displacement of poor citizens from city centers, from the time of the Impressionists when Georges-Eugène Haussmann refashioned Paris, to[…..]

Barbad Golshiri: Curriculum Mortis at Thomas Erben Gallery

Barbad Golshiri. The Untitled Tomb, 2012; iron, soot, 53 x 24 in. Edition of 3. Photo: Andreas Vesterlund, courtesy the artist and Thomas Erben Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Barbad Golshiri’s Curriculum Mortis at Thomas Erben Gallery in New York City. The question of martyrdom pervades Barbad Golshiri’s sculptural installation of tombstones in[…..]

Work in Progress: Approaching Utopia at the Contemporary Jewish Museum

Elisheva Biernoff, The Tools Are in Your Hands, 2013. Steel, acrylic latex, magnets, pprox. 15 ft. 8 in. x 24 ft. Courtesy of the artist and Eli Ridgway. Photo: Johnna Arnold.

From our friends at KQED, today we bring you a review of Work in Progress: Approaching Utopia at the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Author Sarah Hotchkiss notes, “…the exhibition makes an irrefutable argument for the importance of art as a tool of social change. The artists’ models, socially engaged artwork, and narrative experiments approach utopia, question it, and allow viewers to process the larger issues behind collective[…..]

External Combustion

Julia Couzens. Heavy sacrifice, 2011; Insy-outsy, 2013; Weakest link, 2013; Sweet, 2011; all works, mixed threads, wire, rope, yarn, and found textiles. Courtesy of the di Rosa Art Foundation.

This Friday we bring you an article from our partner site Art Practical. Written by A. Will Brown—yes, the very same writer who brings you Daily Serving’s Fan Mail twice a month—this article is the first in Brown’s new series An Exhibition, Postpartum, which investigates, “the components of making contemporary art exhibitions in order to encourage readers and art practitioners to evaluate an exhibition as a process[…..]