Los Angeles

Newsha Tavakolian at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

From our friends at Artillery magazine, today we bring you a review of Newsha Tavakolian‘s work at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Author  notes: “…Tavakolian’s women seem to use their societal limitations to trigger an internal process of private empowerment…” This article was originally published on November 20, 2013.

Newsha Tavakolian. Untitled, 2011; inkjet print on Hahnemuhle paper.

Newsha Tavakolian. Untitled, 2011; inkjet print on Hahnemuhle paper.

Since she began her career as a photojournalist at the age of 16, Newsha Tavakolian has been capturing the essence of the modern-day Iranian experience through poignant photographs that challenge Western perceptions of the women of the Islamic Republic, while alluding to the intricate weavings of dialogue that shroud this forward-thinking and over-educated population. Her photographs capture the weight of the internal and external veils that, at first glance, seem to tether their subjects. Yet there is empowerment present in the faces of Tavakolian’s women, alongside determination, and a fiery tenacity that speaks of internal strength and defies subjugation.

Four of Tavakolian’s photographs are on display at LACMA through December 15, 2013. The fourth-floor elevator doors of the Ahmanson Building pull apart to reveal these somber-faced female protagonists who have been plucked from two different series: “The Day I Became a Woman” (2009) and “Listen” (2011).

Read the full article here.

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