New York

Remembering the Dead

From our friends at Bad at Sports, today we bring you another assessment of the Whitney Biennial, which closes this coming Sunday. Author Jessica Cochran examines the archival nature of the current exhibition and notes, “…as the art world grows ever bigger in size and speed, one can only hope that the Whitney Biennial continues to make room for the discursive, textual, and ‘tossed-aside particulars.'”

Joseph Grigely. The Gregory Battcock Archive, 2009-2014; Installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art. Courtesy of Air de Paris, Paris. Photo: Andrés Ramírez.

Joseph Grigely. The Gregory Battcock Archive, 2009-2014; installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art.
Courtesy of Air de Paris, Paris. Photo: Andrés Ramírez.

This year’s Whitney Biennial curators Michelle Grabner, Anthony Elms, and Stuart Comer cast the net so far beyond Chelsea that New York Magazine’s Jerry Saltz lamented “curators are so determined to stay pure, to avoid acknowledging the machinations of commerce, that the show is completely disconnected from the entire world.” Elsewhere, however, in the pages of the more academically inclined Artforum, Emily Apter took the biennial’s discursive turn away from New York–centric art objects as an opportunity to consider the “liminal space” of a museum biennial “replete with printed matter, writing, texts of all sorts—in short, with words.” “The textual object,” she writes, “demands to be seen as a live, or ‘living,’ work, an interface of bio and res.”

It’s true, the archival impulse is what set the tone and struck a chord this year, particularly in the work of Chicago-based Joseph Grigely and Public Collectors (founded in 2007 by Marc Fischer), both curated into the biennial by Anthony Elms. Each taking as their subjects the lives of a deceased creative individual and his personal belongings, their projects build meaningfully on the Whitney Biennial’s recent history of both deceased artists and artist-curated “sub-exhibitions,” notably from the 2012 edition the inclusion of George Kuchar (died, 2011); Robert Gober’s presentation of work by Forrest Bess; Nick Mauss’ curation of queer-oriented work culled from the museum collection; and also discursive contributions, such as Andrea Fraser’s essay No Place Like Home.

Read the full article here.

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