Adam Rompel

From this Author

Glenn Ligon: Call and Response at Camden Art Centre

Glenn Ligon. Live (detail), 2014; video installation; size variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Camden Art Centre, London. Photo: Valerie Bennett

The designation Call and Response describes the antiphony effect, a device in speech in which a speaker elicits cadenced responses from the audience at systematic intervals. It’s a method that actively engages an audience, and although this universal device is as old as human speech in every corner of the world, in the American psyche it is particularly tied to black churches and the gospel[…..]

(detail) at Transition Gallery

(detail), 2014; installation view, Transiton Gallery, London. Courtesy of Andrew Bracey and Transiton Gallery. Photo: Andrew Bracey

The premise seems simple: A painter’s painter curates an exhibition comprising one work each from 118 painters. The breadth of the offering covers the full gamut of the medium and, as a result, creates a beautiful crisis for the genre of painting—and that’s because there isn’t a lick of paint in the most painterly concerned of painting shows. For (detail), artist–curator Andrew Bracey asked each[…..]

The Part in the Story Where a Part Becomes a Part of Something Else at Witte de With

Ahmet Ögüt and Cevdet Erek. Ahmet Cevdet Bey: “Jacket”, 2011.

The Part in the Story Where a Part Becomes a Part of Something Else is an exhibition that covers a lot of ground. The Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art brings together over fifty artists with multifaceted disciplines, but despite the large scale, the show can be distilled to a few threads that highlight the potential for art to create constructed moments. This underlying[…..]

Phyllida Barlow: Fifty Years of Drawing at Hauser & Wirth

Phyllida Barlow. Fifty Years of Drawing, 2014; installation view, Hauser & Wirth, London. Courtesy of the Artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Alex Delfanne.

Phyllida Barlow has upped her game in the last five years with a string of international blockbuster shows and commissions. Omnipresent as she currently is, one would think that Barlow has always enjoyed this kind of success, but that isn’t the case; the work hadn’t received the kind of attention that anoints an artist as “successful” until her Baltic show in 2004. As she is in[…..]

Michael Riedel: Laws of Form at David Zwirner, London

Michael Riedel. Laws of Form, 2014; installation view, David Zwirner, London. Courtesy the Artists and David Zwirner, New York/London.

“There’s no content being produced, because I’m in the first generation that grew up digital…. We are just transferring all the time: tape, CDs, and now the clouds.”[1] Something radical has been happening for a while in art that has been evading easy classification. The digital fold has facilitated a giant mash-up of layers upon layers of information composed from fragments of fragments. Sound bites, video[…..]

Michael Craig-Martin: Objects of our Time at Alan Cristea Gallery

(from left to right) Michael Craig-Martin. Objects of our Time: Takeaway coffee, 2014; Objects of our Time: Memory stick, 2014; both works, series of 12 screenprints, edition of 50; 50.0 x 50.0 cm. Courtesy the Artist and Alan Cristea Gallery. NPC.

Is a glass of water just a glass of water? Consider it for a fraction of a second and suddenly the glass of water carries a lot of Kosuthian baggage—the mind attaches a label to it, compares it to an ideal, then judges its function, and its value changes. Deconstruct the contextual outcome of that mental layering, and the glass of water not only offers[…..]

BP Walk through British Art at Tate Britain

Installation view; Robert Peake, Lady Anne Pope, 1615; Oil on wood & Paul Van Somer, lady Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent, c.1619; Oil on wood. Courtesy of Tate Britain. Photo: A. E. Driggs.

Can you remember the last time you were really excited about seeing your local museum’s pre-modern permanent collection? Familiarity is the antagonist for the seasoned art viewer, and growing weary of a permanent collection becomes inescapable. Perhaps this is excusable in the case of a small collection in a provincial museum—but quite a different thing when the collection bills itself as the nation’s definitive authority[…..]