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Summer Session – Reskill Now!

Suzanne Lacy. Still from the making of The Roof Is on Fire, 1992–94. To make this work, a collaborative performance directed by Lacy and documented in photos, videos, and a film, 220 inner-city teens in 100 cars came together on the garage roof of Oakland’s Federal Building to talk openly, with predetermined topics but no script, in front of “eavesdropping” audiences and cameras.

Today’s installment of our Summer Session considering labor comes from our sister publication Art Practical. Author Celeste Connor contributes an Op-Ed that claims, “To fetishize style trends, as institutions do, as singular models for development of cultural ideas and actions is tragicomically flattening. If we makers are serious about the goal of a growing, inclusive public, reskilling is a crucial antidote.” This article was originally published on June[…..]

Summer Session – Audio Guide Stop For Fred Wilson, Guarded View, 1991, at the Whitney

Fred Wilson. Guarded View, 1991. Sculpture, dimensions variable.

Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we direct you to an excerpt from Fred Wilson’s audio guide to his sculpture Guarded View for the Whitney Museum of American Art. The artist says, “When I was in college, I had been a guard for our college museum. While this was not a major experience, it was something that stayed with me a very long time. And I[…..]

Summer Session – Appropriate Technologies

The Thing Quarterly, John Baldessari edition. Courtesy of The Thing Quarterly. Photo: Michael O'Neal.

From our sister publication Art Practical, today we bring you the next installment of our Summer Session—and this month, we’re considering the idea of labor. Author Abigail Satinsky assesses systems “in which working artists and arts organizations are empowered to devise their own structures for sustainability.” This article was originally published on April 3, 2014. Artists and other creative people who organize their lives around the arts have long[…..]

Summer Session – Ewan Gibbs at SFMOMA

Ewan Gibbs, San Francisco, 2009; graphite on paper, 11 11/16 x 8 1/4 in.; Commissioned by SFMOMA; © Ewan Gibbs; photo: courtesy the artist and Timothy Taylor Gallery, London

Today from our friends at SFMOMA, we bring you a short video of Ewan Gibbs discussing the concept and labor of the drawings he completed for his 2009 exhibition at the museum. Daily Serving also conducted an interview with the artist that year, and we invite you to read it for a deeper understanding of how the artist came to use these techniques.

Summer Session – Honor our Wrinkles: Fiber, Women, Dykes and Queers

L.J. Roberts. Daniel Rosza Lang/Levitsky Singing at the 2013 NYC Dyke March, 2013; single-strand embroidery on cotton; 4 x 8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we bring you a thoughtful conversation between the artists L.J. Roberts and Sheila Pepe. Roberts asks, “What does it mean to have men who are making work that pertains to being a man—about men, male desire, and masculinity—appropriating traditional women’s work and theory that is grounded in feminism, without much accountability?” This interview was originally published on our sister site Art Practical on February 26,[…..]

Summer Session – Help Desk: Support for Artists

Sigmar Polke. Untitled, 1971. Paint on fabric.

Our first Summer Session theme is labor, and today’s Help Desk advice column answers a tricky question about support, “exposure,” and compensation with some help from Working Artists and the Greater Economy (W.A.G.E.). Columnist Bean Gilsdorf notes that “uncompensated exchange can still be ethical.” This article was originally published on May 25, 2015. I espouse fair labor initiatives like W.A.G.E.* to pay artists. However, my own[…..]

Summer Session – Life/Work

Today from our friends at Guernica, we bring you an excerpt from a conversation between Jen Delos Reyes, J. Morgan Puett, and Mierle Laderman Ukeles. The former is the founder of Open Engagement, an annual conference “committed to examining how artists, institutions, and publics approach art and social practice”; the latter two are artists who work the everyday—including labors such as chores and childcare—into their practices.[…..]