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Gwenaël Rattke: Not Fun And Not Free at Romer Young Gallery

Gwenaël Rattke: NOT FUN AND NOT FREE installation view. Courtesy of Romer Young Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Danica Willard Sachs reviews Gwenaël Rattke’s Not Fun And Not Free at Romer Young Gallery in San Francisco. Gwenaël Rattke’s exhibition Not[…..]

100° City at City Limits

Joel Dean. Untitled, 2015; Solarbotics Photopopper Photovore V5.0, glass jar; 11" x 7" x 7". Courtesy of the Artist and City Limits, Oakland.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Jackie Im‘s review of 100° City, a three-person show at City Limits Gallery in Oakland that “…seeks to challenge, to draw people into these messy conversations about anxiety, about the effects we have on the Earth.” Today is your last chance to see the exhibition, which features works by Jason Benson, Joel Dean, and Erin Jane[…..]

Sequence’s Travels Into Several Notions of the Museum

Richard Serra. Sequence, 2006; weatherproof steel; 153 x 488 x 782 3/17 in. overall and 2 in. thick; installation views at New York MoMA (top left) Photo: Lorenz Kienzle, collection of the artist, © 2007 Richard Serra / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, LACMA (top right) Courtesy of the Artist, the Cantor Arts Center (bottom left) Photo: Saul Rosenfield, © 2014–15, with permission of Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University, and SFMOMA’s 85-foot wide by 55-foot long Howard Street gallery (bottom right) Photo: Henrik Kem © 2015.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an excerpt from Rob Marks’ consideration of Richard Serra’s Sequence, recently moved from the Cantor Arts Center to SFMOMA. Marks notes, “Sequence is massive, particularly when seen from afar. But it becomes something completely different up close.[…] For Jonathan Swift, too, size stood as much for difference as it did for power. The Lilliputians start by seeing[…..]

From the Archives – Kim Anno: Water City Berkeley at Kala Art Institute

Kim Anno. Water City Berkeley, 2013 (still); dual-projected video; 21:00. Courtesy of the artist.

Today from our archives we bring you a look back at John Zarobell’s review of Water City Berkeley at Kala Art Institute in Berkeley, California. The first line of the review says it all: “Why celebrate when the world is going to hell?” This article was originally published on December 22, 2013. Why celebrate when the world is going to hell? Kim Anno’s ambitious effort to envision the future of humanity[…..]

Janet Cardiff and George Miller: Infinity Machine at the Menil Collection

Janet Cardiff and George Miller. The Infinity Machine, 2015 (detail). Mixed-media installation in the byzantine Chapel of the Menil Collection, Houston.

From our friends at Glasstire, today we bring you an excerpt from Terry Mahaffey’s review of the inaugural installation at the Byzantine Chapel in Houston. Mahaffey explores his memories of the site—it originally housed a series of frescoes, now gone—and wonders if Janet Cardiff and George Miller’s installation would be better presented in a more neutral space. This article was originally published on April 20, 2015. Dominique de Menil’s[…..]

Beta Space: Diana Thater at San Jose Museum of Art

Diana Thater. Science, Fiction, 2015; two video projectors, media player, and lights; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist; San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose; and David Zwirner, London/New York.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Diana Thater’s current solo exhibition at the San Jose Museum of Art. Author Genevieve Quick notes that this exhibition is remarkably similar to ones the artist has already presented: “I am unconvinced that Thater’s minor changes constitute new works or the experimentation that the series seeks to support.” This article was originally published on April 28,[…..]

From the Archives – Help Desk: To Apply Oneself

Jim Lambie. Strychnine Seven and Seven, 2004; Record covers, tape, photocopies; 125 x 190 cm

It’s application season, and today’s Help Desk column contains some advice about making strategic decisions when applying—again—to various opportunities. This article was originally published on June 23, 2014. You can submit your question to Help Desk anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. Should there be a limit on the number of times you apply for the same opportunity before you come to the realization that[…..]