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Diedrick Brackens: This Is Real Life at Johansson Projects

Diedrick Brackens. 10-79, 2015; hand-woven fabric, nylon, chenille, hand-dyed cotton, bleach; 66 x 14 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Johansson Projects, Oakland.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of This Is Real Life, artist Diedrick Brackens’ current solo show at Johansson Projects in Oakland. Author Anton Stuebner notes, “By invoking […] histories and their associations, Brackens acknowledges that seemingly innocuous devices can produce real and violent effects.” This article was originally published on March 31, 2015. Diedrick Brackens’ show at Johansson Projects, This Is Real[…..]

Trevor Paglen at Altman Siegel Gallery

Trevor Paglen. Circles, 2015 (video still); video; 12:00. Courtesy of the Artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Trevor Paglen’s current exhibition at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. Author John Zarobell writes, “[The work] represents both a bit of art-historical posturing and an active response to government surveillance that allows viewers to imagine an alternative to our current condition. Perhaps a gallery is as good a place as any to[…..]

Tomokazu Matsuyama: Come With Me at Gallery Wendi Norris

Tomokazu Matsuyama. Warm Water, 2015; acrylic and mixed media on canvas; 67 x 104 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Forrest McGarvey reviews Tomokazu Matsuyama’s Come with Me at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco. In Come With Me, Japanese American artist Tomokazu[…..]

Islamic Art Now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Abdullah Al Saab. Technology Killed Reality, 2014;  Courtesy of the Artist, Tamara Keleshian, and  Museum Associates/LACMA

Today from our friends at REORIENT, we bring you an excerpt from Nicola Baird’s review of Islamic Art Now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Baird notes that “the dialogue surrounding the validity of the term ‘Islamic’ as a meaningful art-historical classification continues to attract attention. Indeed, what is Islamic art, and is such a term appropriate?” This article was originally published on February[…..]

Jake Longstreth: Free Range at Gregory Lind Gallery

Jake Longstreth. Free Range, 2014; Oil on canvas in artist frame, 60 x 40 in.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Miguel Arzabe reviews Jake Longstreth: Free Range at Gregory Lind Gallery in San Francisco. For urban dwellers with the means and motivation to leave the city in[…..]

From the Archive – Fan Mail: Joe Webb

Joe Webb. TV Times, 2014; collage; 9 ½” x 6 ¾” inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

Almost a year ago today we published an article featuring the work of Joe Webb. Fan Mail columnist Will Brown selected Webb’s work from hundreds of reader submissions, noting that “humor comes to the fore in all of [the artist’s] images.” Currently, Webb’s work is on view in the Prints & Originals Gallery at the Saatchi Gallery in London through April 7, 2015. This article was originally published on March[…..]

Alec Soth: Songbook at Fraenkel Gallery

Alec Soth. Bree, Liberty Cheer All-Stars, Corsicana, Texas, 2012; pigment print; 39 x 52 in. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. © Alec Soth.

Today we bring you a review of Alec Soth: Songbook at Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco. Writing for Art Practical, author Danica Willard Sachs notes that “The project marks a departure from [Soth’s] usual reliance on narrative annotations to explain his images; it’s a more free-flowing, less didactic viewing experience.” This article was originally published on March 26, 2015. In twenty-one black-and-white pigment prints from the larger photobook Songbook,[…..]