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Curating in an Era of Change: In Conversation With E. Jane

E. Jane. Notes on softness, 2016, NewHive site.

Today from our friends at ARTS.BLACK we bring you the third installment of author Ashley Stull Meyers’ series Curating in an Era of Change.  In this iteration of the work, Meyers interviews conceptual artist E. Jane. They discuss the internet as exhibition space, academia, and navigating the art world—and the world at large—as Black women. E. Jane states, “I think the social media feed has some Utopian possibility[…..]

Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at SFMOMA

Tsunehisa Kimura, Americanism, 1982; photomontage; 15 1/4 x 19 1/4 in. (38.74 x 48.9 cm); promised gift of a private collection to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; © Estate of Tsunehisa Kimura

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Max Blue assesses Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at SFMOMA. When viewing any retrospective of work, patterns emerge. Visiting Japanese Photography from[…..]

From the Archives – Vesna Pavlović: LOST ART at Zeitgeist Gallery

Vesna Pavlović. Video Still, May 25, 1979, Television, Belgrade. 2015. Endura metallic print. 20.5 x 14 inches. Image courtesy of the artist and Zeitgeist Gallery (Nashville, TN).

“Instability, fragmentation, and brokenness”—these words could easily refer to the current global political situation, yet here they specify the 20th-century regime of Josep Broz Tito, a Yugoslavian revolutionary whose later presidential reign was marked by repression and human-rights violations. In street protests, as in galleries and museums, citizens around the world are turning to imaginative expressions of their fears and objections, and we are reminded of the[…..]

Sarah Crowner: Touch the Tile

Sarah Crowner. Beetle in the Leaves, 2016; Installation view.

From our friends at Guernica, today we bring you an interview with artist Sarah Crowner. Author Elizabeth Karp-Evans and Crowner discuss her show at MASS MoCA (open through February 2017), her art-historical influences, craft, and constructivism. Crowner states, “I think that art history can be a medium that can be manipulated in the same way that a material, like paint or clay, can be.” This article[…..]

Coille Hooven: Tell it by Heart at the Museum of Arts and Design, New York

Installation view of Coille Hooven: Tell It By Heart.
Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Lux Yuting Bai reviews Coille Hooven’s Tell It By Heart at the Museum of Arts and Design, New York. Focusing on material-based[…..]

From the Archives – Beverly Buchanan: Ruins and Rituals at the Brooklyn Museum

Beverly Buchanan. Low Country House, n.d.; wood, 17.75 x 16.75 x 13.25 in. ©Estate of Beverly Buchanan. Courtesy of Jane Bridges and the Brooklyn Museum. Photo: Adam Reich.

On Saturday, millions of women around the world marched to protect their rights and make their voices heard for equality, pouring into the streets and carrying signs with messages both personal and political. In light of the energy their work manifested, today we bring you Lia Wilson’s review of Beverly Buchanan’s exhibition at the Brooklyn museum; unlike the signs and banners from #WomensMarch—many of which are now[…..]

Precarious Citizenship

Gazi Nafis Ahmed. Shahinoor & Nipa #2, 2013. Courtesy of the Artist. “I am a woman and I love another woman. I want to live with my lover. I don’t want anyone to come between us. We don’t want anyone among us to commit suicide, to get hurt, to become addicted to drugs, to cut themselves. Let us live the way we want to. Now is the time to open up and talk about it.”

Today, as we in the United States live our first day under a new administration, we bring you John Zarobell’s “Precarious Citizenship.” Originally published in Art Practical’s issue 8.1, this article explores the “precarious citizenship” of Gazi Nafis Ahmed, a Bangladeshi artist whose rich black-and white portraits of queer communities have gained unwanted fundamentalist attention, making it unsafe for him to remain in his country. Zarobell says, “Precarious citizenship is[…..]