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Mean Time to Upgrade at InterAccess

Hannah Epstein. Cock Fight, 2010; mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist and InterAccess. Photo: Robin Hamill Photography 2014.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Shauna Jean Doherty reviews Mean Time to Upgrade at InterAccess in Toronto. The exhibition Mean Time to Upgrade at Toronto’s premiere new-media art gallery, InterAccess, responds to the[…..]

Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art

Jean-Michel Basquiat. Charles the First, 1982; acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas; three panels, 78 x 65 in. Courtesy of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, New York © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you an assessment of Jordana Moore Saggese’s new monograph, Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art. Of Basquiat’s work, reviewer Anton Stuebner notes: “[the] canvases require viewers to […] recognize that the boundaries of pictorial representation, like language, can be redefined and reformed.” This article was originally published on October 7, 2014. The mythology around Jean-Michel Basquiat continues to proliferate in[…..]

Laida Lertxundi

Laida Lertxundi. Still from Cry When it Happens / Llora Cuando Te Pase, 2010; directed by Laida Lertxundi.

Today from our friends at BOMB Magazine, we bring you an excerpt from Katie Bradshaw‘s interview with filmmaker Laida Lertxundi. The artist describes her process: “I rearrange and take apart these formal conventions and then you have to enter a new space, and maybe there’s something freeing in that. […] I think it’s productive, when there’s something happening in the form that’s uncomfortable.” This interview was originally[…..]

How Small It Actually Is

Artwork by William Powhida, from the cover of  "9.5 Theses on Art and Class" by Ben Davis.

Today from our friends at Guernica, we bring you an excerpt from Alex Zafiris’ recent interview with Ben Davis. Zafiris notes: “As with all empires, the art world is driven by money. What differentiates it, at least in some cases, is its very particular set of values.” This interview was originally published on October 1, 2014. In 2010, Ben Davis, a young art critic and regular contributor to[…..]

#Hashtags – Locating Techonology: Therapeutic Bodies

Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett, featuring Daisy Press. Whispering Pines 10, 2012; performance at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Courtesy of the Artist and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Genevieve Quick’s consideration of performances by Mika Rottenberg and Shana Moulton. The author notes: “As early media artists and feminists have done, Rottenberg and Moulton construct imaginative narratives that probe the unsettling relationship between the body, screens, technology, and contemporary life.” This article was originally published on October 15, 2014. Mika Rottenberg’s and Shana Moulton’s absurdist[…..]

Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution at the China Institute

“Double Happiness” tray with design of mango, 1969; industrial enamel; 31 cm in diameter. Courtesy of the Artist and the China Institute.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Adam Monohon reviews Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution at the China Institute in New York City. Mao’s Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution, the[…..]

Protect Me From What You Want

Logo of the sports drink "Brawndo," from the 2006 movie "Idiocracy," directed by Mike Judge.

Today from our friends at Glasstire, we bring you Christina Rees’ essay on the “making [of] museums into happy-clappy community centers,” written in response to the controversial article “Everybody’s an Art Curator” in the Wall Street Journal. As Rees points out: “No other serious profession seems to open itself up to this ‘the public knows best’ mentality as much as that of art. I cannot imagine[…..]