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Yee I-Lann: Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art

Yee I-Lann. Picturing Power: Wherein one nods with political sympathy and says I understand you better than you understand yourself, I’m just here to help you help yourself, 2013; Giclée print on Hahnemüle Photo Rag Ultra Smooth Fine Art, 310 gsm 100% cotton rag paper, 25 x 25 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Tyler Rollins Fine Art.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art in New York City Yee I-Lann’s solo exhibition Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York, is[.....]

From the Archives – Craft is Not Dead

Sebastian Martorana, "Impressions," 2008. Marble. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Patricia A. Young in honor of the 40th Anniversary of the Renwick Gallery and the 30th Anniversary of the James Renwick Alliance.

Today we bring you an article from our archives in celebration of The Brooklyn Rail’s most recent issue, which includes essays by contemporary craft luminaries Namita Wiggers and Glenn Adamson. As Lowery Stokes Sims notes in her excellent editorial essay, “If the notion of ‘diversity’ suggests the fostering of a variety of expressions on an equal footing, then in the visual arts our scrutiny would have to be[.....]

Sarah Christianson: When the Landscape Is Quiet Again at SF Camerawork

Sarah Christianson. Corn field, Antler, ND, September 2013, 2013. C-print, 20 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Sarah Christianson‘s When the Landscape Is Quiet Again: North Dakota’s Oil Boom at SF Camerawork. Author Larissa Archer notes, “Christianson doesn’t try to appeal to emotions with her photographs. They encourage a process by which the viewer mentally forms a bridge between the damning information about the subjects (here, provided by the captions) and the[.....]

Ryan Trecartin at LACMA

Considered a prophet of the digital age, video artist Ryan Trecartin transforms contemporary culture’s addiction to the internet and obsession with technological devices into a violently exuberant visual orgy. Watching his work feels like riding a roller coaster into the vertiginous depths of the Web or looking through a kaleidoscope on acid; it is an experience of hysterical nonlinearity, relentless mutation, and extreme visual and verbal cacophony. On March 25,[.....]

Paz Errázuriz/Matrix 251 at the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive

Paz Errázuriz. La Palmera, Santiago, from the series La manzana de Adán, 1982; gelatin silver print, 19 2/3 x 23 ½ in. Courtesy of the Artist and Galeria AFA, Santiago.

Today from our partner Art Practical, we bring you a review of photographer Paz Errázuriz’s work, on view through tomorrow at the Berkeley Art Museum. Author Danica Willard Sachs notes, “By immersing the viewer in the peripheries of Chilean society, into the brothels and gyms populated by socially isolated men, Errázuriz’s photographs not only put an individual face on oppression, they also highlight a resilience inherent[.....]

Wages for Facebook at Kadist Art Foundation

Laurel Ptak (left) and Christina Linden (right).

Last Wednesday, Kadist Art Foundation and curator Christina Linden hosted a conversation with artist Laurel Ptak, the author/founder of Wages for Facebook, a manifesto (based on the 1975 manifesto Wages Against Housework) that calls for a reconsideration of what it means to participate in a system of for-profit social exchange. To a packed house, Ptak began her talk by showing slides of publications that have printed information, opinions, and reactions to[.....]

RR&P: Repetition, Rhythm, and Pattern at Lewis Art Gallery

L to R:  Corey Escoto, Wheel of Fortune: I’d Like to Solve the Puzzle, 2010, digital prints, frames, plexiglass, 49” x 135”; Corey Escoto, House of Cards, n.d., pleximounted digital prints, wax balls, approx. 35” x 45”; Lilly Zuckerman, 6”x4.5”x3”, 4”x4”x3”, and 5”x3”x3.5”, 2012, porcelain. Courtesy of Lindsey Landfried. Photo: Lindsey Landfried.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Melissa Thorson Hause reviews RR&P: Repetition, Rhythm, and Pattern at the Lewis Art Gallery at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. A century ago, avant-garde art dealer Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler asserted[.....]