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Other Primary Structures at The Jewish Museum

Nubuo Sekine. Phase of Nothingness—Water, 1969/2005; steel, lacquer, water; 47 ¼ x 47 ¼ in. (diameter)  and 11 7/8 x 86 5/8 x 63 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Blum & Poe Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Vanessa Thill reviews Other Primary Structures at The Jewish Museum in New York City. In 1966, the exhibition Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors filled the[.....]

Geof Oppenheimer: Monsters at Ratio 3

Geof Oppenheimer. The Embarrassing Statue, 2014; electroplated steel, Husqvarna 150BT, marble, Brooks Brothers pants, plaster bandages, and MDF; 101 x 33 x 33 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Ratio 3, San Francisco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you author Danica Willard Sachs‘ review of Geof Oppenheimer‘s Monsters at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. This article was originally published on June 18, 2014.   Geof Oppenheimer’s current solo exhibition at Ratio 3, Monsters, continues his investigation of the physical markers of violence. In previous exhibitions, such as Inside Us All There Is a Part That Would Like to[.....]

Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible at the Berkeley Art Museum

Forrest Bess. Bodies of Little Dead Children, 1949; oil on canvas; 6 x 7 5/8 in. The Menil Collection, Houston. Photo: Paul Hester.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maria Porges reviews Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible at the Berkeley Art Museum in Berkeley, California. Forrest Bess (1911–1977), a talented, visionary artist whose work was exhibited in[.....]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Can We Talk About the Audience?

Introduction, Valuing Laboring in the Arts practicum, April 19, 2014, UC Berkeley Art Museum. Courtesy of the Arts Research Center, UC Berkeley. Photo: Joseph del Pesco.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an excerpt of author Michael O’Hare’s response after participating in the “Big Soft (BS) Contract” workshop. This workshop was part of  the practicum “Valuing Labor in the Arts” at the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley, a daylong series of artist-led workshops that explored questions of art, labor, and economics. O’Hare, who is a Professor of Public Policy at[.....]

Report from Philadelphia

Cindy Stockton Moore. Installation view, Other Absences, 2014;
Eastern State Penitentiary, Philadelphia

The third-most-popular visitor destination in Philadelphia is a ruined prison: the Eastern State Penitentiary (ESP). Based on the concept of the Panopticon, in which all inmates are housed in a circular building and under the surveillance of guards in a central tower, ESP opened in 1829 and closed in 1971. At the time of its completion, the fourteen-acre complex was the largest construction in the[.....]

From the Archives – Raymond Pettibon: Hard in the Paint at David Zwirner

Raymond Pettibon. No Title (Where's the green...) 2010; 30 x 22 1/8 in.

Today we bring you a treat from our archives, Michael Tomeo’s review of Raymond Pettibon’s 2010 show at David Zwirner in New York. The reprinting of this review is occasioned by Pettibon’s upcoming conversation with Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon at Strand Book Store on June 25, 2014, in which they’ll chat about his new book Raymond Pettibon: To Wit. This article was originally published on November 17,[.....]

Valuing Labor in the Arts: Reigniting Public Art Policy as Social Practice

Jeremy Deller, Scott King and William Morris. A poster in response to the British government’s 2010 proposal to cut funding for the arts by 25 percent.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Jeffrey Skoller’s response to the workshop “Appropriate Technologies,” which was part of the practicum Valuing Labor in the Arts hosted by the Arts Research Center at UC Berkeley. Skoller asserts, “Given how many young artists today are making art as social practice, relational aesthetics, and cultural activism, and who are devoting their careers to social activism, it is striking that there is[.....]