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From the Archives – Sharon Lockhart: Lunch Break at SFMOMA

Still image from Sharon Lockhart, “Lunch Break (Assembly Hall, Bath Iron Works, November 5, 2007, Bath, Maine),” 2008; 35mm film transferred to HD, 80 min.; courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles; © Sharon Lockhart.

Today from our archives we bring you a review of Sharon Lockhart’s most recent solo exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “The beauty of Lunch Break is that its attenuated moments make it difficult to lock onto a single interpretation,” wrote author Rob Marks. This evening Lockhart is presenting a lecture at California College of the Arts in San Francisco as part of[…..]

Jen Bervin and Dianna Frid

Dianna Frid. NYT. APRIL 24, 2014, RICHARD H. HOGGART, 2014; embroidery floss and graphite mounted on canvas, 15 × 20 inches. Photo: Tom Van Eynde.

From our friends at BOMB Magazine, today we bring you a conversation between artists Jen Bervin and Dianna Frid. They discuss color as a system of classification, Art Povera, and language. Diana Frid says “In classifying, I’m also alluding to the absurdity of classification, because no one is reducible to just one thing. All systems start out idiosyncratically.” This piece was originally published in BOMB 137,[…..]

Fiamma Montezemolo: The Secret at Kadist, San Francisco

Fiamma Montezemolo. Neon Afterwords (The Secret installation view), 2016; LED lights and text. Courtesy of the Artist and Kadist, San Francisco. Photo: Jeff Warrin.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Leila Easa reviews Fiamma Montezemolo: The Secret at Kadist in San Francisco. Like many other fascinating thought exercises, artist and anthropologist Fiamma[…..]

Renowned Feminist Art Historian Amelia Jones Believes that the Discipline of Art History Should be Restructured to Embrace New Narratives and Diverse Voices

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This week, from our friends at Huffington Post, we bring you an article by artist and writer Jacqueline Bishop exploring the career of art historian Amelia Jones, who has long questioned and worked to challenge existing disciminatory structures as they relate to race, gender, and identity. Bishop quotes Jones, saying “From very early on I found myself interrogating the structures of the discipline, by asking such questions as, ‘Where[…..]

From the Archives – Anthony Discenza Presents A Novel: An Exhibition by Anthony Discenza at Catharine Clark Gallery

Anthony Discenza.

Fiamma Montezemolo’s The Secret just opened at Kadist SF, and Montezemolo’s solo show has us thinking about books, selves, and Borges. Just as Montezemolo deploys redaction of and extraction from Jorge Luis Borges’ short story “The Anthropologist” to draw us into The Secret, so did Anthony Discenza create what has been described as a Borgesian universe (that leads off with a quotation from Borges) of[…..]

A Perfect Storm

Rokni Haerizadeh. But a Storm is Blowing from Paradise. Photo: Ramin Haerizadeh. (© the artist; courtesy the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum)

From our friends at REORIENT, today we bring you author Nur Shkembi’s thoughts on subversive practices in the Guggenheim’s exhibition of Contemporary Middle Eastern and North African Art, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Shkembi states, “This notion of art as a subversive practice is not new; however, redefining the material itself as the place from which ideas are ‘smuggled in’ is certainly compelling.” But a Storm Is Blowing[…..]

Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at the Met Breuer

Diane Arbus. Lady on a Bus, N.Y.C. , 1957; gelatin silver print; 14 x 11 in. Courtesy of The Met Breuer. © The Estate of Diane Arbus, LLC.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Henry Rittenberg reviews Diane Arbus: In the Beginning at the Met Breuer in New York. I was not even a full sentence[…..]