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Janet Cardiff: The Forty Part Motet at Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture

Janet Cardiff. The Forty Part Motet, 2001; installation view, Gallery 308, Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture, San Francisco, 2015. Courtesy of Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Photo: JKA Photography.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Henry Rittenberg reviews Janet Cardiff: The Forty Part Motet at Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture, co-presented by San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, in San Francisco. Spem in[…..]

Interview with Tammy Mercure

Interview_Mercure

Author Taylor Murrow talks with Mercure about her pop-up shop project, where the prices reflect the local gender wage gap.

Cold Storage: James Cordas and Rhonda Holberton

Rhonda Holberton, Knights of the Sky, Digital video projection, 3:24 (looping), Edition 1/1, 2015. Courtesy of City Limits Gallery.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Elena Gross reviews Cold Storage: James Cordas and Rhonda Holberton at City Limits Gallery in Oakland. A chilly, overcast afternoon seemed like the perfect[…..]

Interview with Angelica Mesiti

Artist Angelica Mesiti.

From our friends at Guernica, today we present an interview with Australian video and performance artist Angelica Mesiti. Author Naomi Riddle notes, “In Mesiti’s work, verbal language is decidedly absent. The artist is preoccupied with actions and movement—with the communicative potential of sound and the body, the significance of an upturned hand.” This article was originally published on November 2, 2015. I stood watching Australian artist[…..]

Chris Johanson: Equations at Altman Siegel

Given the cartoonlike basis of most of his portrayals, the slackerly compositions, and the seeming arbitrariness of the surface textures of the paint he uses so dynamically as a set of color choices (seemingly clumsy elements that have often been similarly deployed by other artists who might pass as “outsider,” however relative that term might be), the question arises as to why Johanson chooses to so often paint rather than draw. In these pieces Johanson doubles down on painting in several ways: first, through the large scale of several of the scenes, as with Lecture Series/Abstract Mass, and the bleak consumer composite suburbia of Los Angeles with Pills. Johanson paints on repurposed wood panels and displays most of his work in awkward, large, built wooden armatures to show off both fronts and backs equally (as he has done even more elaborately in installations elsewhere). This prominently shows off the wooden buttressing behind the panels, which he also highlights with “secondary” paintings on the reverse. These include what look like a series of painted geometric doodles mosaic’d on the back of one larger composition, a simple set of color fields of darker and lighter brown parceled out by the different wood elements themselves, and what looks like a beginning painted sketch of an abstract landscape not so dissimilar to what might show up elsewhere as just one among many background components in a “primary” or finished painting by Johanson on the front of one of his panels.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Brian Karl’s review of Equations at Altman Siegel Gallery in San Francisco. The author notes, “Johanson eschews in this set of paintings the strategy of inserting text directly into the worlds he creates. The titles of the pieces do some of that work.” This article was originally published on November 30, 2015. In this exhibition of ten new works (all[…..]

An Evening Redness in the West at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

Andrea Carlson. Ink Babel, 2014; ink and oil on paper; 115 x 183 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Bockley Gallery.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Alicia Guzmán reviews An Evening Redness in the West at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, NM. When viewers enter An Evening[…..]

Nicole Cherubini: Golden Specific at Samson Projects

From our friends at Big Red & Shiny, today we present a review of Nicole Cherubini’s exhibition Golden Specific. Author Zach Horn notes, “The sculptures in Golden Specific are emphatically contemporary but with significant history, like the punky offspring of a storied dynasty.” This article was originally published on November 23, 2015. Golden Specific, Nicole Cherubini’s exhibition at Samson Projects, is meditative. The gallery’s white box is punctuated[…..]