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Best of 2009 – Moby Dick

Moby Dick at the Wattis Institute, 2009.

We are looking back on a decade of Daily Serving’s greatest hits, and today’s selection comes from Shotgun Reviews editor Jen Stager: “‘This great white interior was empty even when it was full, because most of what was in it didn’t belong in it and would soon be purged from it. This was people, mainly, and what they brought with them from outside,’ wrote David[…..]

Best of 2008 – Destroying Prettiness: Wangechi Mutu and Kara Walker

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As part of our ten-year anniversary celebrations, we’re considering the best of a decade of arts publishing. Today’s selection comes from senior editor Vivian Sming, who writes, “Author Catherine Wagley asks us to critically reflect upon the convergence of seduction and brutality in the works of Wangechi Mutu and Kara Walker. This review of Mutu and Walker’s concurrent exhibitions demonstrates the continued and ever-pressing need for[…..]

Best of 2007: Interview with Carrie E. A. Scott

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As part of our ten-year anniversary celebrations, we’re considering the best of a decade of arts writing. Today’s selection comes from editor-in-chief Bean Gilsdorf, who notes, “I love looking back through the DS archives to find that the artists, curators, and institutions mentioned a decade ago are alive and kicking. For example, Carrie E. A. Scott is curating and writing in London now, James Harris is[…..]

Best of 2006: Diana Al-Hadid

Diana Al-Hadid. Spun Of The Limits Of My Lonely Waltz, 2006;
wood, polystyrene, plaster, fiberglass, pigment;
72 x 64 x 64 in.

Happy holidays! This year we’re doing something different with our annual “Best Of” series—to celebrate our tenth anniversary, we’re looking back across a decade of art writing. Our first selection comes from our founder Seth Curcio, who writes, “While going back through the very early days of Daily Serving, I stumbled across a post featuring Diana Al-Hadid. I’ve always been captivated by the artist’s sculptures. From[…..]

Between Citizenry and Privilege: Ai Weiwei and Bouchra Khalili

Ai Weiwei and Rowlit Chawla. Weiwei on Lesvos Beach, 2016. Photo: Rowlit Chawla for India Today.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Jordan Amirkhani’s article from 8.1: Art + Citizenship. Amirkhani discusses the recent work of artists Ai Weiwei and Bouchra Khalili as they respond to global crises. Amirkhani quotes Hannah Arendt, who speaks to citizenship and  those who lack the “rights to rights,” saying, “If a human being loses his political status, he should, according to the implications of the inborn[…..]

Printed Matters – Jonathan Griffin: On Fire

Jonathan Griffin. On Fire, 2016. Courtesy of Paper Monument.

Our struggle to take in the losses of the Ghost Ship fire, to hold up those who lost their lives, and to meet the needs and rights of those who remain foregrounds connection and community. KQED’s series of visual and textual remembrances shines a light on each person who died. It is with this focus on the people who make up our art world that[…..]

Breaking Point: Accessibility and the Cummer Museum

A 2004 meeting of Women of Vision. The group of low-vision and blind women meet monthly at the Cummer Museum to make art, go on touch-tours of the museum, and write their memoirs. Photo courtesy of Hope McMath.

Today we bring you Calder Yates’s essay from our sister publication, Art Practical; originally published in Issue 8.1: Art + Citizenship. Yates retraces the history of the Cummer Museum in Jacksonville, Florida, and its journey towards accessibility and inclusivity under former museum director Hope McMath. Calder states “In Jacksonville, with all of the residual bigotry that comes with its legacy as a city in the South, the creation of[…..]