Alex Bigman

From this Author

Philippe Decrauzat: Pour Tout Diviser at Elizabeth Dee

Philippe Decrauzat. Installation shot of "Pour Tout Diviser." Courtesy the Artist and Elizabeth Dee, New York. Photograph by Etienne Frossard.

Elizabeth Dee presents Pour Tout Diviser, an exhibition of work by Swiss artist Philippe Decrauzat, as “a two-sided exhibition in three acts.” The first and second apparently occurred in Madrid and Paris, so New Yorkers experience the show’s conclusion. (There is no indication at the Chelsea gallery of what the European displays were like.) Without speculating as to what exactly makes the exhibition “two-sided,” the[.....]

Roger Hiorns at Luhring Augustine

Roger Hiorns; Untitled (Security Object), 2013; cast stone; and Untitled (Surface 2), 2014; Steel, flat screen and youth; © Roger Hiorns; Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York.

Roger Hiorns’ current solo exhibition at Luhring Augustine—the British artist’s first in New York City—presents viewers with two inscrutable situations: In one, a quantity of gray powder has been deposited, apparently by hand, over a large, rectangular area occupying the better part of the main gallery; in another, a nude male model loiters about a massive, faceted stone object and a low table, the surface[.....]

Recurrence at Fridman Gallery

Lauren_Fensterstock_FRIDMANGALLERY

Recurrence, a five-artist exhibition curated by Luisa Aguilar Solis and Georgia Horn now at Fridman Gallery, takes its name from Italo Calvino’s 1968 novel, Daughters of the Moon. Calvino imagines a world in which capitalist society’s obsession with consumption and novelty, and the cycle of obsolescence that inevitably follows, reaches a fever pitch: People decide that the moon, cratered as it is, is past its[.....]

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Jeff Koons, Michael Jackson and Bubbles, 1988. Porcelain; 42 x 70 1⁄2 x 32 1⁄2 in. (106.7 x 179.1 x 82.6 cm). Private collection. © Jeff Koons

At the press preview for Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, more than one member of the Whitney Museum’s curatorial staff urged visitors to dispense with “preconceived notions” about Koons and embrace the exhibition as an opportunity to view the artist’s perhaps too-well-known oeuvre with fresh eyes. One of the largest retrospectives the Whitney has ever mounted, Jeff Koons sprawls across three floors in ascending chronological order,[.....]

#Hashtags: Critiquing Museums from the Outside In

The Broad_exterior rendering

#museums #architecture #philanthropy #urban development #institutional critique #spectacle #metaphor In January, the Los Angeles 2020 Commission, a group of thirteen experts convened by the Los Angeles City Council to assess the city’s civic problems, delivered a damning report. Titled “A Time for Truth,” it begins with the statement “Los Angeles is barely treading water while the rest of the world is moving forward,” and gets[.....]

Ragnar Kjartansson: Me, My Mother, My Father, and I at the New Museum

Ragnar Kjartansson. Take Me Here by the Dishwasher (Memorial for a Marraige), 2011. Installation view, Ragnar Kjartansson: Me, My Mother, My Father, and I, 2014. Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Ragnar Kjartansson’s Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage, a mixture of live performance and film, transforms the New Museum’s fourth floor into something like a college movie night sent adrift. The darkened gallery, one wall of which serves as projector screen, becomes a makeshift den—modestly furnished but amply stocked with beer—for ten shaggy troubadours with acoustic guitars. Their ambling, unbroken melody[.....]

Sarah Lucas: Nud Nob at Gladstone Gallery

Sarah Lucas.
Chicken Knickers, 2014;
Digitally printed wallpaper.
Photo: David Regen.
Copyright Sarah Lucas.
Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

The circulation of images from Sarah Lucas’ Nud Nob, now at Gladstone Gallery, on social media and elsewhere seems bound to be both blessing and curse. On the one hand, shots of enormous concrete penises resting on crushed automobiles, or a series of floor-to-ceiling photographs of a woman consuming a banana, really propagate themselves, which makes for great publicity. But those who encounter these images are[.....]