Alex Bigman

From this Author

Radcliffe Bailey: Maroons at Jack Shainman Gallery

The preserved crocodile carcass, pinned against a ratty tarp to form the centerpiece of a work called On Your Way Up, is as good a place as any to begin a review of Radcliffe Bailey’s exhibition Maroons at Jack Shainman gallery. Though purportedly on the ascent, this climber has clearly seen better days; its exposed finger bones, protruding between disintegrated flesh, seem unlikely to carry[.....]

Nicola Hicks at Flowers Gallery, New York

Nicola Hicks; Banker II, 2009; bronze, 79 x 37 x 63 inches. Courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

Nicola Hicks’ recent sculptural tableaux, depicting humans, animals, and frightful crossbreeds of towering stature, exemplify art’s ability to produce rich, nonverbal worlds. Though the works on view at Flowers Gallery are classified merely as plaster (to be cast in bronze upon purchase), they in fact begin with wire skeletons that the British artist then stuffs with a mélange of straw and dirt before coating. This[.....]

Best of 2013 – Mike Kelley at MOMA PS1

For our Best of 2013 series, Fan Mail columnist A. Will Brown selected Alex Bigman‘s review of Mike Kelley’s retrospective at PS1. Says Brown, “The untimely death of Mike Kelley is a potent reminder of how important every minute can be, particularly for those exploring and challenging the very mesh of society. This article, while particularly well written, hints at the importance of displaying Kelley’s oeuvre,[.....]

Mike Kelley at MoMA PS1

Mike Kelley, now at MoMA PS1, is massive. The largest retrospective of the artist’s work to date, it is comprehensive perhaps to a fault, filling each of the exhibition space’s four floors to capacity and arguably beyond. The former school building’s multiple stairwells allow for various paths through the exhibition—a feature that is liberating if potentially disorienting—but the overall impression is one of totality; of[.....]

Taner Ceylan at Paul Kasmin Gallery

Taner Ceylan’s Lost Paintings series, marking the Turkish artist’s first New York solo exhibition since joining the roster of Paul Kasmin Gallery, makes for a suitably impressive debut. Begun in 2010, it consists of ten stunningly detailed hyperrealist paintings, each of which alludes to a particular figure from Turkish history or the canonical Western depictions thereof. Ceylan here aims to upset the attendant nationalist/Orientalist narratives[.....]