Allegra Kirkland

From this Author

Michelle Segre: Symptoms of Escape Velocity at Derek Eller Gallery

Michelle Segre. Spaghetti Love, 2014; mixed media on paper; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, New York.

The constructions of Israeli-born artist Michelle Segre—towering webs of yarn, wire, and organic matter—resemble dispatches from another planet or totems of some long-lost civilization. Unfinished and roughly made, her work still evidences painstaking attention to detail, a ritualistic practice in which all the constituent elements impart shrouded, mystical meaning. A small show of her most recent work, currently on view at Derek Eller Gallery, expands[.....]

The Dark Side of Mickey Mouse: Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum

Llyn Foulkes. Pop, 1985-90; mixed media with soundtrack; 84 x 123 x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist's website.

Llyn Foulkes ranks among that rare cadre of artists for whom fame is an optional extra. Over the course of his fifty-year career, the Los Angeles–based multimedia artist and musician has experienced periods of success—for his monumental Pop-influenced paintings of rocks and, decades later, for his zany, large-scale narrative tableaux. But much of his work has been met with silence from critics and buyers, allowing[.....]

Close to Home: Tom Wood at Thomas Erben Gallery

Tom Wood. Untitled, 1985; C-print, edition of 7 (+2 AP). Image courtesy of the artist and Thomas Erben Gallery, New York.

Empathy may not be one of the first words people associate with modern documentary photography, but Ireland-born photographer Tom Wood has it in spades. Wood, who currently resides in North Wales, lived for twenty-five years in Merseyside, a seaside county in North West England, and photographed local residents in portraits that are relatable, real, and fundamentally sympathetic toward their subjects. Though he is often compared[.....]

Change Over Time: Richard Misrach at Pace MacGill

Richard Misrach. Untitled (February 14, 2012 6:15 PM), 2012. Pigment print mounted to aluminum. 79 3/8 x 106 inches.

California-based photographer Richard Misrach first emerged on the American art scene in the 1970s, praised for his pioneering use of color film and large-scale prints. He spent the next four decades of his career using these techniques to document the fragile relationship between man and the environment, paying special attention to decaying, off-kilter landscapes. His photographs of former nuclear test sites in Nevada and Utah,[.....]

Alone Together: Newsha Tavakolian at Thomas Erben Gallery

Newsha Tavakolian, "Look," 2012. Inkjet print, 41 x 55 in., courtesy the artist/Thomas Erben Gallery

“We are all so much together, but we are all dying of loneliness.” This quote by German theologian Albert Schweitzer captures a universal truth about the human condition, but its poignancy is particularly acute for city dwellers. Feeling lonesome while contemplating the vastness of the ocean or looking at the night sky is one thing; feeling isolated while surrounded by a crush of people on[.....]

Laughter in the Dark: Diego Perrone at Casey Kaplan Gallery

Diego Perrone. Detail view. Idiot's mask (Adolfo Wildt), 2013. Airbrush on PVC. 77.75 x 248.75" / 197.5 x 631.8cm. All images courtesy Casey Kaplan.

The leering white faces watch from the walls. They follow you from room to room, vacant eyes staring out from behind their grotesque masks. Though the lower part of their jaws are missing—unhinged—their slit-like eyes and upturned mouths indicate that the figures are consumed with mirth. We see the same white mask over and over, but from various angles: on its side, in three-quarter profile,[.....]

The Scattered Geometries of Matt Phillips

canadian sunrise:ds

This, and then. It’s the title of Matt Phillips’ latest exhibition and a useful shorthand for the mental quick march a viewer undergoes when observing his work. Through his abstract oil and acrylic paintings, Phillips plays with color, form, and volume—the building blocks of our artistic experience—to create dynamic, shifting spatial relationships. His canvases evoke, simultaneously, the calm beauty of the natural world, the randomness[.....]