Anuradha Vikram

From this Author

#Hashtags: Between Truth and Fiction

ruby onyinyechi amanze. Kindred, 2014; graphite, ink, pigment, enamel, photo transfers, glitter on paper; 80 x 78 inches. Photo courtesy of Tiwani Contemporary, London and the artist.

#truth #history #narrative #Afropolitan #multiculturalism #future In an age when fact and falsehood are often indistinguishable, The Ease of Fiction is a title that gives pause. The exhibition, now at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles, was curated by Dexter Wimberly for the Contemporary Art Museum in Raleigh, North Carolina. Having been invited to participate in the exhibition’s collateral programming as a speaker[…..]

Hashtags: House of Horrors

Pedro Reyes. Doomocracy (Voting Room), 2016.

#privatization #gentrification #immigration #violence #history #freedom At the time of this writing, Pedro Reyes’ Doomocracy installation at the Brooklyn Army Terminal feels like a relic of a bygone era. Just one week after the project’s close, it is difficult for this writer to remember what it felt like to laugh at a funhouse of political horrors, featuring privatized national parks, designer oxygen boutiques, anti-abortion pep rallies, and[…..]

#Hashtags – Toward the Black Museum

Hammer Projects: Simone Leigh, September 17, 2016–January 8, 2017. Installation view, courtesy of Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Forrest.

#museums #race #representation #institutional critique The recent controversy over Kelley Walker’s exhibition Direct Drive at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, and the departure of that exhibition’s curator, Jeffrey Uslip, was another reminder that museums are not built and programmed for all audiences alike. As this column has taken up questions of race in the museum on numerous occasions (and class in the museum, and[…..]

#Hashtags: Water Water Everywhere

Teresa Margolles. La Sombra (The Shade), 2016; concrete veneer on wood. Artwork commissioned by City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) for CURRENT:LA Water. Photo by Panic Studio LA.

#environment #conservation #access #resources #water #public art #civic art #biennials Los Angeles is a metropolis built on a delusion: that engineering can overcome a basic lack of sufficient resources to meet the popular need. Five years into a severe drought, one would think conservation would be on everyone’s mind, but the clean cars and green lawns all around town suggest otherwise. To increase discussion of[…..]

#Hashtags: Convergences and Displacements

Community assists with evacuation of Townhouse library and archives, April 9, 2016. Photo courtesy Townhouse Gallery.

#Townhouse #Cairo #gentrification #urban #culture #displacement This past week has left the venerable nonprofit Townhouse Gallery shaken. Though the attempted demolition of its building at 10 Nabrawy Street in Cairo has been halted, the gallery is faced with months of work ahead to secure its future. Operating since 1998, Townhouse is known for drawing international artists and thinkers to Egypt, and nurturing an emerging network of[…..]

Hashtags: Crossing the Lines

Breezeway, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, 2016, with installation view: Shinique Smith, 
Forgiving Strands, 
2015 – 2016. Image courtesy the artist and  Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joshua Targownik / targophoto.com

#capitalism #markets #institutions #gentrification #innovation Two recent unconventional gallery openings on the West Coast have upended expectations about how the commercial and nonprofit sectors of the art world correspond to and interact with one another. Hauser Wirth & Schimmel’s seven-building complex in Los Angeles’ downtown arts district is a commercial gallery with institutional ambitions, promising thematic exhibitions, high-profile loans, publishing, and scholarship. Minnesota Street Project,[…..]

Hashtags: The Impossible Dream

Clark Richert, view of Drop City, “the Complex,” in El Morro, outside Trinidad, Colorado, circa 1966. Photo: courtesy Drop City Photo Archives

#utopia #nostalgia #technology #street art #counterculture Technology and utopia are united in a certain subset of counterculture in Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia at the Walker Art Center. The show illustrates the ideals and limitations of the utopian imaginings by artists of the 1960s and early 1970s with early computer graphics imaging, speculative architecture proposals, political posters, and installation art. In contrast to ideal societies,[…..]