Anuradha Vikram

From this Author

Best of 2013 – #Hashtags: The State of Art: Bangladesh, Portugal, Greece, and Palestine at the Venice Biennale

Continuing our Best of 2013 series, today’s pick comes from co-founder and former managing editor Julie Henson, who explains her choice: “The Venice Biennale is the Olympics of the art world. An event of this scale always manages to reflect the state of the artworld in both intended and accidental ways — drawing parallels between complex relationships such as nationality and race, or economics and globalization. That’s[.....]

Best of 2013 – #Hashtags: On the Political in Art

As we continue our Best of 2013 series, today’s pick comes from Bean Gilsdorf, who writes, “As the managing editor of Daily Serving, I get to work with over thirty super-talented authors from around the world, so it’s very hard for me to select just one article for this series. However, I really appreciate the energy that Anuradha Vikram has brought to writing and editing our[.....]

#Hashtags: Nostalgia and its Discontents

Charlene Tan. Love Forever: A Homage to Yayoi Kusama, 2010. Color photograph. 36 x 48 in. Photo courtesy of the artist.

#museums #diversity #nostalgia #representation Proximities 2: Knowing Me, Knowing You was the second of three exhibitions of Bay Area contemporary art curated by Glen Helfand for the Asian Art Museum. This series marks a departure from AAM’s customary focus on artists from remote geographic locales and the museum’s heretofore sporadic commitment to exhibiting contemporary art. The second exhibition resolved the primary concern that I raised[.....]

#Hashtags: The Ethnicity Exhibition

Lorraine O’Grady. Untitled (Mlle. Bourgeoise Noire and her Master of Ceremonies enter the New Museum),
1980–83, printed 2009. Gelatin silver print. 7 1/4 x 9 1/4 in. Courtesy the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York.

#race #ethnicity #gender #institutions #access #identity Since the Civil Rights Era, it has become commonplace for marginalized ethnic communities to instate their own institutions of sociological and cultural study such as university Ethic Studies departments and museums like Brooklyn’s Museum of Contemporary African Diaspora Arts. In the face of extreme prejudice and exclusion from the discourses of history and art, many have felt the necessity[.....]

Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery

Jean-Ulrick Désert. Negerhosen2000 / The Travel Albums, 2003. From a series of forty digitally printed images, pigmented inks, and pencil on archival paper with mixed media collage. 11 3/4 x 8 1/4 in. Courtesy the artist.

How is Blackness performed?  Most African American contemporary artists will admit in confidence that they are often expected to perform their Blackness for the power players of the art mainstream, regardless of their choice of artistic medium. Artists working in two dimensions such as Kerry James Marshall, Kara Walker, and Wangechi Mutu have gained currency by creating work that makes the construction of black identity[.....]

#Hashtags: The Trouble with the Mission School

Chris Johanson. The Survivalists, 1999. Mixed media; dimensions variable. 
Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Johnna Arnold/SFAI.

#access #gentrification #street art #painting #historicity A panel at the San Francisco Art Institute on October 20 in conjunction with the Walter and McBean Galleries exhibition Energy That is All Around – Mission School: Chris Johanson, Margaret Kilgallen, Alicia McCarthy, Barry McGee, Ruby Neri, posed the question: “Mission School: Yes or No?” The general consensus, both on the panel and in the wider Bay Area[.....]

#Hashtags: The State of Art: Bangladesh, Portugal, Greece, and Palestine at the Venice Biennale

Joanna Vasconcelos. Valkyrie Azulejo, 2013. Handmade woolen crochet, fabrics, ornaments, polyester, LEDs and electric system. Dimensions variable. Portuguese Pavilion, 55th Venice Biennale. Courtesy of the artist and the Transtejo – Transportes Tejo, S.A., Lisbon. Photo by the author.

#politics #statehood #borders #biennials #nationalism The Venice Biennale is fundamentally shaped by its founders’ belief in statehood. Each nation-state secures its site, much like an embassy, and asserts its self-image through the choice of curators and artists. Four pavilions at the 2013 Biennale demonstrate how the notion of the nation-state is constructed and deconstructed in the face of contemporary global pressures. For Bangladesh, the pavilion[.....]