Bryan Granger

From this Author

Todd McDonald: Visual Feedback at Redux Contemporary Art Center

Todd McDonald. Go In to Get Out, 2014; oil on panel; 48 x 72 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

The gesture which we would reproduce on canvas shall no longer be a fixed moment in universal dynamism. It shall simply be the dynamic sensation itself. — Umberto Boccioni, et al, 1910 Todd McDonald’s Visual Feedback at Redux Contemporary Art Center addresses new modes of processing and viewing digital images as part of a painting practice. McDonald collects photographs of architectural elements and urban landscapes in[…..]

Linear Abstraction at the SCAD Museum of Art

Phillip Stearns. Linear Abstraction, 2015; installation view. Gutstein Gallery, Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of the Savannah College of Art and Design. Photo: Marc Newton.

Abstraction is dead! Long live abstraction! In Linear Abstraction, the SCAD Museum of Art negotiates the status of nonrepresentational work as it exists in the 21st century and includes work in various media, including painting, sculpture, photography, and digital formats. While the exhibition seeks to trace commonalities between contemporary practices by engaging somewhat diverse uses or ideas of lines, the resulting effect points succinctly to[…..]

GIF Studio at the Jepson Center

Nicolas Sassoon. Studio Visit, 2014 (still, detail). Looping GIF. Courtesy of Telfair Museums, Savannah, Georgia.

Within the Jepson Center of the Telfair Museums in Savannah, Georgia, there is a hallway that connects the main atrium to an auditorium, an education center, a small technology gallery, and the restrooms. This hallway gets a significant amount of foot traffic, but it does not provide optimal conditions for exhibiting traditional artwork. However, six flat-screen TVs, a digital projector, and an iPad are currently[…..]

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists at the SCAD Museum of Art

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists, installation view, SCAD Museum of Art. Franck Abd-Bakar Fanny, Another Day without You, 2013; five c-prints mounted on disec; 39 ½ x 70 ¾ inches each. Ghada Amer, The Blue Bra Girls, 2012; stainless steel; 72 x 62 ¼ x 54 inches. Lamia Naji, Immaculé, 2011; six c-prints mounted on Dibond; 45 ¼ x 61 inches each. Courtesy of SCAD Museum of Art, photo by Marc Newton.

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists at the SCAD Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, is an ambitious show, but originally I pondered the reason for viewing the work of African artists through a lens of an archetype of Western literature, The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri. While such an endeavor may not seem particularly edifying at the outset,[…..]

Yaakov Israel: The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art

Yaakov Israel. Abandoned Water Park, Dead Sea, 2010; c-print. Courtesy the artist and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, South Carolina.

In 1981, John Baldessari said, “Probably one of the worst things to happen to photography is that cameras have viewfinders…” but artist Yaakov Israel would certainly disagree.[1] Israel’s photographs in The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina, are carefully constructed. Israeli-born and -based, Israel relishes the serendipitous encounters he’s had while exploring[…..]

Marie Orensanz: Works from the ‘70s at Alejandra von Hartz Gallery

Marie Orensanz. Marie Orensanz: Works from the ‘70s, 2014; installation view, Alejandra von Hartz Gallery, Miami. Courtesy of Alejandra von Hartz Gallery.

“Fragmentism searches for the integration of a part into a whole, transformed by its multiple readings, into an unfinished and unlimited object.” So declares Argentinian artist Marie Orensanz’s Manifesto Fragmentismo, which appears on a 1978 print in her current exhibition at Alejandra von Hartz Gallery in Miami. The print exists both as a work itself and as a framework in which to view the various[…..]

William Cordova: Ceiba: Reconsidering Ephemeral Spaces at MDC Museum of Art + Design

Installed in the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami, William Cordova’s exhibition Ceiba: Reconsidering Ephemeral Spaces shares a geopolitical bond with the building in which it is located. Now a venue for Miami-Dade College’s Museum of Art and Design, the Freedom Tower’s original tenant was the Miami News & Metropolis newspaper. After a period of vacancy, it served as an immigration center for Cuban refugees fleeing[…..]