Bryan Granger

From this Author

Frank Stella: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Frank Stella. Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985; oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum; 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The stylistic shift in Frank Stella’s work has been met with fierce criticism, to say the least. Much has been written recently about his current retrospective at the Whitney, trying to connect his wildly expressive, three-dimensional works of the past few decades with his singular striped paintings of the 1960s. More than thirty years ago, Douglas Crimp characterized Stella’s late work from the 1970s as[…..]

Manjunath Kamath: As Far As I Know at the SCAD Museum of Art

Manjunath Kamath. As Far As I Know, 2015; installation view, Savanna College of Art and Design Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of the SCAD Museum of Art.

The humorous pathos in the work is readily apparent, from the rabbits’ curiosity exposing them to deadly exhaust to a car dying and ascending to heaven.

Black Box: Sergio Caballero at the Hirshhorn Museum

Sergio Caballero. Ancha La Castilla or N’importe quoi, 2014 (video still); digital video, 24:00. Courtesy of the artist and Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Sergio Caballero combines grotesque materials, low-budget techniques, and a healthy dose of dark humor in his film Ancha La Castilla or N’importe Quoi (2014). Ancha La Castilla is the latest iteration of Black Box, a series dedicated to moving-image works at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. The twenty-five-minute film tells the tale of a young girl named Alegría as she becomes possessed and thus[…..]

Something to Take My Place: The Art of Lonnie Holley at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

Lonnie Holley. Blood on the Shoes of a Civil Rights Worker, 2005; installation view, Something to Take My Place, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, SC. Photo: Rick Rhodes.

“I am an artist of America,” declared Lonnie Holley during a talk for the opening of his exhibition at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. This self-identification was Holley’s response to being labeled a folk artist throughout his career. While the visibility of his work may have suffered due to this label—his most recent solo museum show was in 1994—Holley proves[…..]

Come As You Are: Art of the 1990s at the Telfair Museums

Come As You Are: Art of the 1990s, 2015; installation view, Jepson Center for the Arts, Telfair Museums, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of Telfair Museums. Photo: David J. Kaminsky.

Finally, here is an exhibition for which an accompanying Spotify playlist seems perfectly natural. Songs like “Smells Like Teen Spirit” by Nirvana and “Vogue” by Madonna are closely connected to the not-so-recent decade that the Telfair Museums represents through works of art in Come As You Are: Art of the 1990s. Curated by Alexandra Schwartz with Kimberly Sino (both of the Montclair Art Museum, where[…..]

Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

Invariant Interval, 2013; installation view, Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature, 2015. Courtesy of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, SC. Photo: Rick Rhodes.

The desire to create forms via chance and natural phenomena is reflected in the works in Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature at Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. Despite a disparate range of formats, including porcelain sculpture, complex wire installations, and color aquatints, this exhibition brings together a wide array of works that originate from a process-based practice and share connections to[…..]

Todd McDonald: Visual Feedback at Redux Contemporary Art Center

Todd McDonald. Go In to Get Out, 2014; oil on panel; 48 x 72 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

The gesture which we would reproduce on canvas shall no longer be a fixed moment in universal dynamism. It shall simply be the dynamic sensation itself. — Umberto Boccioni, et al, 1910 Todd McDonald’s Visual Feedback at Redux Contemporary Art Center addresses new modes of processing and viewing digital images as part of a painting practice. McDonald collects photographs of architectural elements and urban landscapes in[…..]