Bryan Granger

From this Author

Remix at the Columbia Museum of Art

Fahamu Pecou. Rock.Well (Radiant Pop, Champ) (after Norman Rockwell’s Triple Self Portrait), 2010; acrylic on canvas; 48 x 48 in. Courtesy of Scott and Teddi Dolph and Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina.

The recent curatorial trend of probing the fringes of art history for artists who have been eclipsed by the canon of white, European, male artists is a noteworthy one. While shows that feature such artists—in many cases, those who are Black—are becoming more prevalent, organizers must take care to contextualize the work without reinforcing myths that persist. The curators of Remix: Themes and Variations in[…..]

Invisible Presence: Bling Memories at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center

Ebony G. Patterson. Invisible Presence: Bling Memories, 2014; installation view, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Courtesy of the Artist and Atlanta Contemporary Art Center.

On May 8, 2001, the funeral of William Moore, aka Willie Haggart, was a raucous affair. Abandoning the somber mood of a typical funeral, the ceremony was a giant party at the National Arena in Kingston, Jamaica. Labeling it a “celebrity event,” Donna P. Hope writes that the style of Haggart’s funeral “ruptured the sobriety and mourning associated with traditional funeral rites.”[1] With this, the[…..]

State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now at the Jepson Center

Sheila Gallagher. Plastic Lila, 2013; melted plastic on armature; 81 × 64 1/2 in. Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Photo: Stewart Clements Photography.

The contemporary-art business is frequently portrayed as a cosmopolitan endeavor. The centers of the art world typically are cities where people buy expensive art, and easily consumable forms—like oil-on-canvas paintings—are usually favored by collectors and dealers. The exhibition State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now, presented by the Jepson Center at the Telfair Museums in Savannah, Georgia, explores artistic activity throughout the country; with[…..]

Frank Stella: A Retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Frank Stella. Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985; oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum; 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The stylistic shift in Frank Stella’s work has been met with fierce criticism, to say the least. Much has been written recently about his current retrospective at the Whitney, trying to connect his wildly expressive, three-dimensional works of the past few decades with his singular striped paintings of the 1960s. More than thirty years ago, Douglas Crimp characterized Stella’s late work from the 1970s as[…..]

Manjunath Kamath: As Far As I Know at the SCAD Museum of Art

Manjunath Kamath. As Far As I Know, 2015; installation view, Savanna College of Art and Design Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia. Courtesy of the SCAD Museum of Art.

The humorous pathos in the work is readily apparent, from the rabbits’ curiosity exposing them to deadly exhaust to a car dying and ascending to heaven.

Black Box: Sergio Caballero at the Hirshhorn Museum

Sergio Caballero. Ancha La Castilla or N’importe quoi, 2014 (video still); digital video, 24:00. Courtesy of the artist and Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Sergio Caballero combines grotesque materials, low-budget techniques, and a healthy dose of dark humor in his film Ancha La Castilla or N’importe Quoi (2014). Ancha La Castilla is the latest iteration of Black Box, a series dedicated to moving-image works at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. The twenty-five-minute film tells the tale of a young girl named Alegría as she becomes possessed and thus[…..]

Something to Take My Place: The Art of Lonnie Holley at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

Lonnie Holley. Blood on the Shoes of a Civil Rights Worker, 2005; installation view, Something to Take My Place, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, SC. Photo: Rick Rhodes.

“I am an artist of America,” declared Lonnie Holley during a talk for the opening of his exhibition at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. This self-identification was Holley’s response to being labeled a folk artist throughout his career. While the visibility of his work may have suffered due to this label—his most recent solo museum show was in 1994—Holley proves[…..]