Elspeth Walker

From this Author

Formal Collapse: No Name at On Stellar Rays

(From left to right) Michael Mahalchick. Flag, 2013. Newspaper, bacon fat, pigment, brushes, tacks, Savarin coffee can; 43 x 78 x 10 in. Susan Collins. Long Fallen Wide, 2013. Poplar, tulipwood, maple, beech, white holly, crushed malachite, beeswax, oxidized silver, white gold, bronze, garnet, amber; 71 x 5 x 5 in. Shamus Clisset, SWASS (Long Charm), 2012. C-print; 80 x 56 1/2 in. Nathaniel Robinson. Heap, 2013. Pigmented polyurethane resin, acrylic paint; dimensions variable. Bayard. President Balances National Budgie, 2008. Mohair; dimensions variable. Sterling Allen. Untitled, 2013. Ribbons, pushpins; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artists and On Stellar Rays.

No Name, the group show currently on view at Lower East Side gallery On Stellar Rays, is a theory-based project that develops a collaborative scene of  “gestures, memories and detritus.” The show presents a collection of objects that are incoherent, elusive, and laden with a mysterious personal logic. The work demonstrates a strong theoretical basis, drawing primarily from Judith/Jack Halberstam’s advocation of failure as a[…..]

The Transcendental Trash of Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt

Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt. The Fountain of Youth (Spritzer Thaw), 1969; Aluminum foil, plastic wrap, pipe cleaner, holographic tape, glitter, staples, mirror, colored marker; 13 x 10 x 9 in. Courtesy of the artist and Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York.

Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt makes kitsch from the kitchen, using everyday materials such as cellophane, glitter, foil, and Easter-display grass to construct minutely detailed and coded ephemera that sanctify camp, trash, and a kind of queer sentimentality particular to the artist’s experience of the 1970s Hell’s Kitchen scene in New York. Ecce Homo, Pavel Zoubok Gallery’s current three-part exhibition, orbits around this artist’s counter-historical queer aesthetic. On the heels of his extensive[…..]

Pay Attention: Claudia Joskowicz at LMAKprojects

Intersections, Claudia Joskowicz’s two-channel video installation and accompanying photographic series at LMAKprojects, is a straightforward display of her newest video piece, Every Building on Avenida Alfonso Ugarte – After Ruscha. The insular gallery space of LMAKprojects has been transformed into a kind of dark pathway. The spectator enters and is sandwiched between two opposing, life-size projections of two sides of the same street: Avenida Alfonso[…..]

Tracey Emin at Lehmann Maupin: The Carry

Tracey Emin’s work presents an unfiltered and often embarrassingly personal view of emotional pain. It reflects the kind of desperate or careless narcissism that is the territory of the depressed. Emin is concerned with the primacy of her own experience—and the narrative of her own sadness is the unabashed subject of her work. Emin’s oeuvre has always felt most valuable to me in terms of[…..]

Airing Out the D: A Conversation with Caitlin Cunningham

Caitlin Cunningham’s current solo exhibition is on view at sophiajacob in Baltimore, Maryland, through May 25th. The show, informally titled Tan Penis Island, extends from a focused critique of the legacy of modernist painter Paul Gauguin’s exploitation of Tahiti to examine the ramifications of fantastic projection, the economy of colonization, and the production of white masculinity through the exotic Other. Cunningham integrates live plants and[…..]

Historicizing Fantasy: iona ROZEAL brown at Salon 94 Freemans and Edward Tyler Nahem

iona ROZEAL brown’s stylized painting emerges from a studied transmutation of African-American and Japanese cultural tradition. Brown has developed a strong narrative lineage essential to reading her coded (albeit straightforward) illustrative paintings of Afro-Japanese courtesans, voguing stars, and fantasy creatures of mythic royalty. Brown’s concurrent exhibitions at Salon 94 Freemans and Edward Tyler Nahem seek to extend and perpetuate this narrative in a new elaboration[…..]

“NOW! THAT’S WHAT I CALL ART”: NYC 1993 at the New Museum

Pepon Osorio, "The Scene of the Crime (Whose Crime?)," [Detail] 1993. Mixed medium installation.

NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star is the New Museum’s crash course in the recent history of contemporary art in New York. The exhibition positions 1993 as a signifier for mass cultural change: the thesis being that the events of this year irrevocably directed culture towards its manifestation in 2013. NYC 1993 seems just as concerned, however, with the ways that we[…..]