Evelyn Xs

From this Author

Xochiquetzal: Erotismo y Procreación at ArtSpace México

Rürrü Mipanochia. Xolotl-pie hecho de bola and Muerte-Xolotl, 2016; acrylic, stylographs, and magic markers on paper; 88 x 75.5 cm and 76 x 120 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Artspace México. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

In Georges Bataille’s eroticism, there is little or no place to theorize about feminine transgression. The feminine is absent in his work. Women, for Bataille, occupy the place of God, a promise of connection with the universe. The only problem is that God is dead. Thus, Bataille’s eroticism only shows us a structure for masculine transgressive pleasure that instrumentalizes feminine bodies in order for masculine subjects[…..]

Carla Rippey: Resguardo y Resistencia at Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil

Carla Rippey. Cuando mi sangre aún no era mi sangre, 2008-2016 (detail); photo-transfer and sewing on paper; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and the Museu de Arte Carillo Gil, Mexico City. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

Upon entering Carla Rippey’s retrospective, Resguardo y Resistencia,* at Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, the viewer is confronted by a large-scale installation that presents a multiplicity of themes carried throughout the exhibition. The installation, Cuando Mi Sangre Aún No Era Mi Sangre [When My Blood Was Not Yet My Blood] (2008–16), consists of dozens of historical archive images transferred onto paper and intervened upon with sewn marks.[…..]

The End at Estudio 71

Diego Narvaez. Glacier, 2013; oil on canvas; no dimensions. Courtesy of the artist and Estudio 71, Mexico City. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

The two-year residency program of Estudio 71, organized by the artist Berta Kolteniuk in collaboration with Sinagoga Histórica, culminates in the exhibition The End. A show like this one, based on the work resulting from several artist residencies, runs the risk of lacking curatorial direction, and indeed the work on display does not immediately convey any aesthetic or conceptual unity. It includes everything from representational[…..]

Gloria Carrasco: Prófugos del Metate at the Museo de Arte Popular

Gloria Carrasco. Prófugos del Metate, 2014 (detail); object-art. Courtesy of the artist and Museo de Arte Popular, Mexico D.F. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

Even if viewers know a little about the cultural and culinary history of Mexico, Gloria Carrasco’s exhibition at the Museo de Arte Popular in Mexico City might appear to be a show dedicated to the phallus. The gallery is filled with dozens of variations on the same object—a long, tapered shape made in a multitude of materials from textiles to ceramics and colors from earthy[…..]

An Other Art World in Mexico

Contemporary art in Mexico operates within a very specific social and economic climate. Since 2006, Mexico has experienced ever-escalating levels of criminal and state violence. Suspicion of collusion between organized crime and the government is common. The case of the presumed torture and murder of the forty-three normalistas directly shows the extent of cooperation between criminal groups and local, regional, and federal authorities. Police officers,[…..]

La Polis Imagi-nada at El Quinto Piso

Liz Misterio. El regreso de Ana Suromal, 2015 (action-art still); action-art and video projection. Courtesy of the artist and El Quinto Piso, Mexico D.F. Photo: Liz Misterio.

What is a city? How can it be conceptualized? How does one create oneself within that geographic and symbolic space? These questions frame the most recent show at El Quinto Piso, La Polis Imagi-nada. The curatorial statement talks about the polis and civic participation in theoretical terms, but the exhibit situates these concepts firmly within the symbolic and geographic realities of Mexico City. El Quinto[…..]

Lorena Wolffer – Expuestas: Registros Públicos at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City

Antimemorias: enmiendas públicas, 2011; installation view, Lorena Wolffer Expuestas: registros públicos, 2015. Courtesy of Lorena Wolffer and Museo de Arte Moderno. Photo: Jorge Gomez del Campo.

Walking into Lorena Wolffer’s Registros Públicos at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City is a deeply unsettling experience. The space is tiny, just a few meters across, and the ceiling height is far closer to a bedroom than a gallery. Written in large red letters along the walls are a series of insults and threats from husbands and lovers to their partners–although using[…..]