Jing Cao

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Tales of Our Time at the Guggenheim Museum

Sun Yuan & Peng Yu. Can’t Help Myself, 2016; Kuka industrial robot, stainless steel and rubber, cellulose ether in colored water, lighting grid with Cognex visual-recognition sensors, and polycarbonate wall with aluminum frame. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection © Sun Yuan & Peng Yu. Photo: David Heald.

Let’s talk about the apocalypse. It looms over Tales of Our Time, an exhibition of newly commissioned works by contemporary Chinese artists at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, from a video installation literally called In The End Is The Word to the 10-foot robotic arm that violently moves blood-red ink in Sun Yuan and Peng Yu’s Can’t Help Myself. Curators Xiaoyu Weng and Hou[…..]

Between Declarations and Dreams: Art of Southeast Asia Since the 19th Century at the National Gallery Singapore

Exhibition View of Between Declarations and Dreams: Art of Southeast Asia since the 19th Century in Singapore’s restored Supreme Court Building. Courtesy of National Gallery Singapore.

In Kevin Kwan’s deliciously trashy best-selling novel, China Rich Girlfriend, a wealthy Singaporean heiress outmaneuvers Chinese billionaires at auction to acquire works for the soon-to-open National Gallery. The real National Gallery Singapore opened to the public in November 2015, and as Kwan’s novel suggests, the museum was strategic in its acquisitions. By choosing to direct its considerable resources toward the relatively undervalued field of Southeast[…..]

Made in Taiwan: A Retrospective of Yang Mao-Lin at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum

Yang Mao-lin. Zealandia Memorandum L9301 (1993); oil, acrylic on canvas; 112 x 194 cm. Courtesy of Taipei Fine Arts Museum.

A robust Asian democracy, Taiwan elected its first female president earlier this year. Yet thirty years ago, when the island was tentatively emerging from four decades of military rule, this future was far from certain. Made in Taiwan: A Retrospective of Yang Mao-Lin, now on view at Taipei Fine Arts Museum, spans three decades of the artist’s work. His vivid early paintings captured the growing[…..]

He Yunchang: Water Forming Stone at Ink Studio

He Yunchang. Inner Sanctuary, 2015. Courtesy of INK Studio.

A clear and joyful light floods the inner gallery of Ink Studio in Beijing, where He Yunchang performed a series of three grueling new works in his exhibition Water Forming Stone. Light dances through candy-colored drinking glasses that are suspended in midair over a pedestal of simulated crystals and jade. It radiates off of the warm white walls cleverly composed of cardboard shipping boxes and[…..]

Taca Sui: Steles – Huang Yi Project at Chambers Fine Art Beijing

1.	Taca Sui, Tomb of Prince Lu #1 (2015). Silver on baryta paper. 53 x 80 cm. Courtesy of Chambers Fine Art.

Taca Sui’s photographs in Steles – Huang Yi Project at Chambers Fine Art Beijing capture images that cut across time: transcendent tombs and temples, primordial rock formations, and ephemeral waves. Sui’s black-and-white prints are a culmination of his research on Huang Yi, a celebrated 19th-century Chinese artist and archaeologist. Sui immersed himself in Huang’s writings, using Huang’s diaries as a guide to plan a photographic[…..]

On Kawara: Silence at the Guggenheim Museum

On Kawara. DEC. 29, 1977 (Thursday, New York), 1977, from Today series, 1966–2013; acrylic on canvas; 8 x 10 in; shown with artist-made cardboard storage box, 10-1/2 x 10-3/4 x 2 in. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner, New York/London and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.

The first retrospective since On Kawara’s death in July 2014, On Kawara—Silence at the Guggenheim Museum presents fifty years of the artist’s work. At the core of the exhibition are the daily practices that constituted Kawara’s life and art: the conceptual rituals that produced the Today, I Got Up, I Met, I Went, and I Am Still Alive series. Each series represents a different way[…..]

From Two Arises Three at the Asian Art Museum

Michael Cherney and Arnold Chang. After Huang Gongwong 4, 2009 (detail); photographic inkjet print and ink on paper. From the collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang. Courtesy of the Artist and Asian Art Museum. Photo: Jing Cao.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Jing Cao reviews FromTwo Arises Three: The Collaborative Works of Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Chinese landscape painting is[…..]