Liz Glass

From this Author

Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Mark Mothersbaugh. My Little Pony, 2013; ceramics; 53 x 59 x 33 in. Courtesy of the artist and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) is a timeless sort of place. Sure, its first floor boasts an urban-inspired coffee bar with contemporary furnishings that gesture toward the present day, but the galleries tell a different story of time altogether. From costumes to hand-painted ceramics, ritual objects to period rooms, the MIA offers abstract snapshots of other places and other times, mixing centuries and geographies[…..]

Jaime Davidovich: Adventures of the Avant-Garde at the Bronx Museum

Jaime Davidovich. Blue/Red/Yellow, 1974; three video installations; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Henrique Faria, New York.

Spread about a large rear gallery at the Bronx Museum, this exhibition surveys various bodies of work by the Argentine American artist Jaime Davidovich. At the entrance of the show, alongside the explanatory wall text, a small monitor atop a pedestal plays the video that lends the exhibition its title, Adventures of the Avant-Garde. In this 1981 short loop, Davidovich takes on a role that[…..]

Doris Salcedo at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Doris Salcedo, Atrabiliarios (detail), 1992-2004. Installation view, Doris Salcedo, MCA Chicago. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Accessions Committee Fund purchase:gift of Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein, Patricia and Raoul Kennedy, Elaine McKeon, Lisa and John Miller, Chara Schreyer and Gordon Freund, and Robin Wright. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

The fourth floor of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago is typically an airy space with high ceilings and ample skylights, but currently it is crowded with an overabundance of furniture. Visitors are greeted with the pleasant mineral smell of dirt and a dense maze of wooden tables. The lighting is diffuse, almost grayed, and the galleries take on the look of a luminous dusk,[…..]

Feast: Radical Hospitality in Contemporary Art at the Weisman Art Museum

Red76. Occupy Yr. Home Dinner, 2012; performance and installation, Chicago.

The exhibition Feast: Radical Hospitality in Contemporary Art originated with the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art in 2012. Since then, it has had stops at the Blaffer in Houston, SITE Santa Fe, the Gund Gallery at Kenyon College, and is now on view at the University of Minnesota’s Weisman Art Museum. Founded on the idea of examining artists’ invocations of food as a[…..]

Art(ists) on the Verge at the Soap Factory

Katie Hargrave, In Poor Tastes Good, 2014; mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy The Soap Factory. Photo by Lillian Egner.

Now through April, the sprawling, rough-and-tumble brick spaces of Minneapolis’ Soap Factory are filled with installation projects by five artists—the Art(ists) on the Verge, as it were. It is not quite fair to consider Art(ists) on the Verge as a single exhibition, as there is no curatorial or artistic conceit to cement the various projects into a cohesive entity. The works on view are the[…..]

Archive State at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College

David Oresick, Soldiers in Their Youth (still), 2009; digital video montage; 20 mins. Courtesy the artist and the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago.

On view across three levels of the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College in Chicago, the exhibition Archive State presents five discrete bodies of work developed by six artists. (One of the installations is made by a duo.) Spatially expansive and ideologically packed, each of these five groups of works deserves individual attention. Likewise, the title of the exhibition itself is due some unpacking. Using the[…..]

Julia Rometti & Victor Costales: Savage Palms, Worn Stones, Moonshine Vision at Midway Contemporary Art

Julia Rometti & Victor Costales, Ediciones del Exotismo Ordinario Internacional Neotropical (detail), ongoing from 2011, digital prints on newsprint paper (lapel revolución). Courtesy Midway Contemporary Art. Photo: Caylon Hackwith.

At Midway Contemporary Art in Minneapolis, dueling 35mm slide projectors whir and click in a darkened back room. Perched on top of two of the room’s many bookcases (this backroom also houses Midway’s impressive library), these projectors cast their images onto a shared center screen. Each slide contains a simple form on a white background: a single geological mass anchored by a heavy shadow. Overlapped[…..]