Luise Guest

From this Author

Things Happened on the Island: Lam Tung-pang’s Floating World

Lam Tung-pang / Things Happened on the Island / Acrylics, charcoal, pencil, scale model and wooden toys on plywood / H 244 x 700 x W 60cm / Acrylics, charcoal, pencil, scale model and wooden toys on plywood / 2013 image courtesy the artist

In early 2011, when I visited a number of young Hong Kong artists’ in their studios, they spoke of their frustration at the focus of curators on art from mainland China, and of their sense of being a ‘poor relation’. Add to that the tensions simmering just below the surface as cashed–up mainlanders poured into Hong Kong, and it seemed a recipe for resentment. In[.....]

Registering difference, considering change, mapping regeneration: the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art

Twenty years ago in the Asia Pacific Triennial’s first catalogue Caroline Turner wrote, “Euro-Americentric perspectives are no longer valid as a formula for evaluating the art of this region”. Today this seems obvious – but to a significant degree this is due to the previous 6 exhibitions which introduced audiences to the richness of contemporary art practices in the region. It was through the APT[.....]

Holding Up Half the Sky: An interview with Lin Tianmiao

After seeing Bound Unbound, the major retrospective show of Lin Tianmiao’s work at the Asia Society Museum in New York I was so intrigued by how such work could emerge from the testosterone-fuelled Chinese artworld in the late 90s that I decided to seek her out in Beijing to ask her what it’s like to be pretty much the only female artist in China to[.....]

A Double Take at White Rabbit

Zhang Chun Hong, Life Strands, 2004, charcoal and graphite on paper, 1160 x 150 cm, image reproduced courtesy of White Rabbit Gallery

Things are not quite what they seem in ‘Double Take’ at the White Rabbit Gallery in Sydney. The exhibition presents some new works and others which have been seen before but deserve re-examination. A heap of porcelain sunflower seeds, a shiny Harley Davidson which turns out, on closer inspection, to be a bicycle, and the doorway of a Beijing apartment which reveals itself to be[.....]

What the Birds Knew

Ken and Julia Yonetani, ‘Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations (USA), 2012 , 2.1 X 1.6 metres, Chandelier frames, UV lights, electric components and uranium glass beads  Courtesy of the artists, Artereal Gallery, Sydney and GV Art, London  Photography: Zan Wimberley

In Kurosawa’s 1955 movie ‘I Live in Fear’ Toshiro Mifune plays an aging industrialist so frightened of a nuclear attack on Japan that he tries to move his entire family to Brazil, far away from radioactive fallout. If the birds knew what was coming, he says, they would fly away in terror. His children have him committed to a psychiatric institution. The alternative title for[.....]

18th Biennale of Sydney Part II: Cockatoo Island and the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia

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  Disembarking visitors to the 18th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island first encounter fog rising from a crevice between sandstone cliffs and the island’s abandoned buildings. A site-specific work by Fujiko Nakaya, it exemplifies the intentions of the artistic directors  - to open our senses to water, wind, and earth. Jonathan Jones, of the Wiradjuri and Kamilaroi nations, created a midden of oyster shells and porcelain teacups,  a poignant reference[.....]

18th Biennale of Sydney Part I: ‘all our relations’

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Initially I suspected the title of the 18th Biennale of Sydney, the trendily lower case ‘all our relations’, might be one of those curatorial conceits that work better as an intellectual device in the abstract than in the physical reality of the exhibition. I was wrong.  Joint artistic directors Catherine de Zegher and Gerald McMaster have successfully created a coherent and evocative series of narratives[.....]