Nandita Raghuram

From this Author

Sze Tsung Leong: Horizons at Yossi Milo Gallery

Sze Tsung Leong. Lake Michigan, 2012; Chromogenic Color Print; 28” x 48”. Courtesy of Yossi Milo Gallery.

Mexican-born, British-American photographer Sze Tsung Leong photographs vast, spare landscapes from around the world in his ongoing series, Horizons, on view at Yossi Milo Gallery. The arrangement of photos hops from place to place while remaining visually cohesive due to the shots’ shared composition: The horizon line bisects the image at the same point in each photograph, producing the perception of a single line unrolling along the[…..]

Katia Kameli: The Situationist Effect at Taymour Grahne Gallery

In The Situationist Effect, Katia Kameli’s first solo show in New York at Taymour Grahne Gallery, nine photographs and a short film, Futur, capture the alternately serene and crumbling landscape of Marseille, France. Images of velvety black skies and rich blue oceans contrast with scratchy fields of dead grass and stone. Many include a looming nuclear reactor in the background. Futur plays in the center of the gallery, unfurling[…..]

Carrie Mae Weems: The Museum Series at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Carrie Mae Weems. Guggenheim Bilbao, 2006; Digital Chromogenic Print; 72 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

Currently at the small Studio Museum in Harlem, visitors will find several black-and-white photographs by Carrie Mae Weems, each of which captures the artist dressed in a simple, long black dress. Her pose—tall and regal, with strong shoulders and a long, straight spine—rhythmically repeats itself throughout the gallery. These photographs depict Weems standing outside some of art’s most celebrated institutions, including the Louvre, the Tate[…..]

Andrew Moore: Dirt Meridian at Yancey Richardson Gallery

The 100th meridian west is a longitudinal line that snakes through North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma, and forms the eastern border of the Texas panhandle. Historically, it divides the weathered, parched land in the western Great Plains from its lush, eastern neighbor. Through digital aerial photographs and large-format negatives taken on land, artist Andrew Moore captures this sparsely populated area, not scarred[…..]

Julie Cockburn: Slight Exposure at Yossi Milo Gallery

On entering Yossi Milo Gallery, the viewer is thrust into a bubblegum-bright world. Dull, vintage vacation snapshots and the strained smiles of a graduation portrait are transformed into photographs reminiscent of greeting cards. Through sewn-on balls and lines, and Sharpie-thick strips of thread, artist Julie Cockburn playfully graffitis each photograph. But a surreal, eerie quality belies their perky facades. Cockburn creates this effect using found photographs from[…..]

Sophie Calle: Absence at Paula Cooper Gallery

© 2013 Sophie Calle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. 
Courtesy of Sophie Calle and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. Photo: Steven Probert

In 2005, Sophie Calle’s mother found out she had breast cancer. In 2006, as her mother lay dying, Calle set up a camera at her deathbed and recorded the entire process. “I wanted to be there, to hear the last word,” she told ARTINFO. “I didn’t know if she would have something to tell me at the last minute.” She did. In Absence, Calle’s current[…..]

Rinko Kawauchi at Aperture Gallery

In Japanese, the word ametsuchi contains two characters, side by side. Together, they mean heaven and earth and make up the title of the oldest pangram in Japanese—a bare-bones chant that contains only six lines but, somehow, also includes every character in the Japanese syllabary. Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi borrows the title and theme of this ancient poem in her latest body of work, currently[…..]