Rob Marks

From this Author

#museumpractices: The Museum on My Mind, Part III

Marksfi

Wall labels. Curatorial text. Provenance. Titles (or un-titles, as the case may be). At what point do the words surrounding an artwork serve the work, and at what point do they disrupt it? In terms of the museum, specifically, when do explanatory labels benefit museum-goers, and when do they detract from an individual’s experience? This week, #Hashtags features Part III of The Museum On My[…..]

#museumpractices: The Museum On My Mind, Part II

Wall labels. Curatorial text. Provenance. Titles (or un-titles, as the case may be). At what point do the words surrounding an artwork serve the work, and at what point do they disrupt it? In terms of the museum, specifically, when do explanatory labels benefit museum-goers, and when do they detract from an individual’s experience? This week, #Hashtags features Part II of The Museum On My[…..]

#museumpractices: The Museum on My Mind, Part I

John Cage, HV2 25B, 1992; one in a series of 25 aquatints; 12 x 14 inches; published by Crown Point Press, San Francisco. Courtesy of Crown Point Press.

#Hashtags provides a platform for longer reconsiderations of artworks and art practices outside of the review format and in new contexts. Today #Hashtags kicks off a new series on the institution of the museum, by writer Rob Marks. Stay tuned for Part II, and please send queries and/or ideas for future columns to hashtags@dailyserving.com. Part I: If the Walls Would Not Speak The museum is[…..]

#Hashtags: Going Up at SFMOMA

Cindy Sherman, Untitled #92, 1981; chromogenic color print; 24 x 47 15/16" (61 x 121.9 cm); The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Fellows of Photography Fund; ©2012 Cindy Sherman.

#Hashtags provides a platform for longer reconsiderations of artworks and art practices outside of the review format and in new contexts.Please send queries and/or ideas for future columns to hashtags@dailyserving.com. It was miraculous to me, only because I had never seen the space behind the doors. Yet, it was shameful, as if I had seen something I ought not to have seen and, worse, had[…..]

Act. Repeat. Suspend. Sharon Lockhart’s Lunch Break at SFMOMA.

The stairway to the fourth floor of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art leads me directly toward a long, narrow, darkened space, at the end of which is the image of another, much longer, passageway. In that image, a concrete floor below and light fixtures above trace a trajectory toward infinity punctuated by pipes, wires, hoses, storage boxes, tools, and lockers. The scene is[…..]

Recovering Site and Mind: Richard Serra’s Sequence Arrives at Stanford

The Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University is engaged in a dangerous experiment, and it is not the levitation of a twenty-ton piece of Richard Serra’s steel sculpture, Sequence, 2006, thirty feet into the air. Nor is it the gyration of a 200-foot tall crane lifting the first of twelve panels—each almost thirteen-feet high and between thirty- and forty-feet long—from a flatbed trailer onto a[…..]