Thea Costantino

From this Author

What I See When I Look at Sound at PICA

Gingold_opening.jpg

In What I See When I Look at Sound at Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, curator Leigh Robb has presented five works by artists whose practices collectively traverse the visual, sonic, and performative. With a title that nods to books by writers Raymond Carver and Haruki Murakami, this exhibition aims to probe the relationship between the seen and heard, exploiting the synesthetic interplay between the senses. To[.....]

Marian Drew: Centrepiece at Turner Galleries

One of my favorite pieces in the National Gallery of Victoria is Édouard Manet’s 1880 work The Melon. At around 13 x 17 inches, it’s a modest study of a rather warty specimen, but I’m always tickled by the addition of an ornate gold frame far too large for the humble painting. It’s this incongruity that always draws me back to the gallery whenever I[.....]

Best of 2013 – Cripplewood at the Venice Biennale

Here at Daily Serving we count down the days to the New Year by presenting you with our best writing from the outgoing year. Today’s review was selected by writer and Regional Editor Marilyn Goh, who says, “I came to know about Ghent-based artist Berlinde De Bruyckere through Thea’s pitch of Cripplewood-Kreupelhout at the 55th Venice Biennale. Months later, the unsettling images of Bruyckere’s works[.....]

Valentina Vannicola: Dante’s Inferno

Inferno. Tolfa, Rome, Italy, April 2010 February 2011. ### Infer

In Dante’s Inferno Italian artist Valentina Vannicola merges staged photography with socially engaged practice, resulting in a rich body of work reminiscent of the postdramatic theater of Romeo Castellucci and the Societas Rafaello Sanzio. Using non-professional performers from her hometown of Tolfa, north of Rome, Vannicola has constructed absurdist scenes recreating Dante’s journey through the strata of hell. While the outcome could easily have been[.....]

Susan Flavell: Freud’s Desk at Turner Galleries

Early in 2013, six Australian artists made a pilgrimage of sorts. They left a sweltering southern summer for the gray frigidity of London, where they spent three weeks working on-site at the Freud Museum; Susan Flavell and I were among their number. At the museum, we encountered the shrine-like space of Sigmund Freud’s study, preserved as it was in the final year of his life,[.....]

Andrew Nicholls: The Water Works at Turner Galleries

Australian artist Andrew Nicholls dredges the queasy aesthetics of sentiment for its submerged ideological content. In an ongoing thread of his practice, he locates the ideals and practices of British imperialism in the kitsch, seemingly innocuous world of 19th- and 20th-century ceramics, disrupting this historical narrative with traces of the otherness otherwise repressed in the imperial worldview. He subsumes his viewers in an unsteady undertow[.....]

Cripplewood at the Venice Biennale

It takes a moment for my eyes to adjust. It’s dim and dank in here, despite the warmth of the Venetian summer. A long, gnarled mass lies sprawled across the length of the floor; in the gloom of the pavilion its flesh seems luminous. In places, its limbs are bound with rags. Sometimes they rest on threadbare cushions. It’s a fallen tree, but it seems[.....]