Articles

Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions at El Museo del Barrio

Adal Maldonado (ADAL). El Spanglish Sandwich, 2000; printed ceramic plate and stand; 8-inch diam. Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio.

Declarations of dissent can manifest in many ways. Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions, currently on view at El Museo del Barrio, surveys a range of Latin American and Caribbean artists who through their art practices have voiced their dissent from oppressive cultural forces. The curator, Nicolás Dumit Estévez, frames these artistic impulses as foundational to the history and spirit of[…..]

Loris Gréaud: The Unplayed Notes Museum at Dallas Contemporary

Loris.

From our friends at Glasstire, today we bring you Christina Rees’ review of Loris Gréaud’s current solo exhibition at Dallas Contemporary. Rees describes the choreographed destruction of the work and characterizes the show as “a partial and contrived ruin,” noting that neither the artist nor the visitors seem invested. This article was originally published on January 19, 2015.  I suppose in the event of a chemical attack[…..]

Walead Beshty: A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future at Barbican Center

2.	Walead Beshty. Installation Shot of A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench. 2013-2014. Wall Installation Made of Cyanotypes. Photo: Getty Images/Chris Jackson.

In 1979 at the Whitney Museum of American Art, American avant-garde filmmaker Hollis Frampton gave a lecture devoted to the origins of film and the utility of defunct technologies. Toward the end, Frampton paused to vaguely describe a work of art composed of the accumulating detritus, by-products, and disparate actions piling up in his studio, which he called A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without[…..]

Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological Age at Root Division Gallery

Tessie Barrera Scharaga. Nahua-Pipil, the Forbidden Language of El Salvador, 2014; Mixed media installation, 
10 x 7 x 11 ft.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Nancy Garcia reviews Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological Age at Root Division in San Francisco. In Living with Endangered Languages in the Technological[…..]

Keith Haring: The Political Line at the de Young Museum

Keith Haring. A Pile of Crowns for Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1988; acrylic on canvas; 120 x 120 x 120 in. Courtesy of de Young Museum San Francisco. Collection of the Keith Haring Foundation. © 2014, Keith Haring Foundation.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Kara Q. Smith’s review of Keith Haring: The Political Line at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. Smith notes that the exhibition “…offers the chance not only to appreciate the artist’s work and iconic imagery from multiple perspectives (albeit sometimes dizzying at this scale), but most importantly the chance to bring new context to the work.”[…..]

Fan Mail: Celeste Fichter

Celeste Fichter. Significant Others series: Pop, 2010; canned spinach, c-print; 7 x 10 x 2 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

A close-up shot of Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s face, Prince Charles atop his horse playing polo, and Dom DeLuise in drag pouring wine: What do these three things have in common? Nothing really, except that images of them, as well as many other well-known people, places, products, and tropes, appear in the uniquely humorous and witty compositions of artist Celeste Fichter. In her three serial[…..]

Amanda Turner Pohan: The Signals Are Caressing Us at A.I.R. Gallery

2.	Amanda Turner Pohan. The Signals Are Caressing Us, 2015; installation view, A.I.R. Gallery, Brooklyn. Courtesy of A.I.R. Gallery.

In the back room of A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, a scent dispenser exhales once an hour. A meandering plastic tube connects the dispenser to a six-and-a-half-gallon jug on the floor near the center of the room. The jug contains the concentrated form of a custom-formulated perfume derived from sensors that measured the carbon dioxide exhaled by the artist Amanda Turner Pohan during thirteen unique orgasms.[…..]