Articles

From the Archives – #Hashtags: Mimics and Minstrels

In light of the current controversy over Dana Schutz’s painting of Emmett Till, today we’re re-reading Anu Vikram’s essay about the last Whitney Biennial, in which Joe Scanlan’s use of the fictional Black persona “Donelle Woolford” initiated a heated debate about representation, race, inclusion, and oppression. Vikram notes, “Scanlan’s decision to cast Black women as agents for his personal edification and creative expression […] supercedes concern for[…..]

Derrick Adams: Network at CAAM

Derrick Adams. Fabrication Station #8, 2016; mixed fabric collage, aluminum hanging rods; 6 x 9 ft. Courtesy of the California African American Museum. Photo: Andy Romer.

Recently many have observed that current American film and television scenarios feel familiar, with offerings that appear diverse and multicultural, as they would have seemed in earlier decades. This is not to say that the struggles of marginalized communities have been overcome; just because a person is visible does not mean that person is liberated. However, media representations can illustrate experiences outside of dominant cultural[…..]

Still Raising Hell at Emory University

James V. Hatch and Camille Billops On the UCLA Campus, 1960; Photograph; Dimensions Unknown. Courtesy of The Camille Billops and James V. Hatch Archives at Emory University (Atlanta, GA).

Gifted to the Stuart A. Rose Library at Emory University in Atlanta in 2002, the Camille Billops and James V. Hatch Archives—a remarkable collection of books, ephemera, and oral histories documenting the rich histories of 19th and 20th-century African American art, art history, and theater—remain one of the most significant holdings of African American cultural achievement in the United States. The archive was initiated in[…..]

Signs of the Times

Organizers put the Women’s March on Washington in Washington D.C. on Saturday Jan. 21, 2017. Photo: Alanna Vagianos, Huffington Post.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Ashley Stull Meyers’ article from issue 8.3: Art can’t do anything if we don’t. Meyers discusses the collecting institution’s role in politics and protest, exploring “what, how, and to what ends our cultural institutions collect,” specifically in regard to protest ephemera. This article was originally published on March 23, 2017. January 21 of this year was a[…..]

The Intersectional Self at the 8th Floor

Andrea Bowers. Throwing Bricks (Johanna Saavedra), 2016; archival pigment print, 77 1/2 x 57 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Jasa McKenzie reviews The Intersectional Self at 8th Floor Gallery. As more feminist marches, protests, and gatherings organize in the wake of the[…..]

Fan Mail: Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith. Marnix Incident, 2012; ink, watercolor, collage, rubber stamps on paper; 24 ¾ x 19 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Patricia Smith’s mapping practice concretizes the ephemeral. Inverting the Situationists’ concept of psychogeography, in which the experience of a place affects a person’s psychological state or behavior, Smith’s maps reinterpret spaces with reference to specific events or feelings. The Incidents series refers to particular moments in time and space. Like any attempt at describing sensation or memory, the results shift and undulate, making room for[…..]

In Memoriam: Leigh Markopoulos

Leigh Markopoulos. Image courtesy of Kevin Killian.

Today we honor the life and work of Leigh Markopoulos (1968–2017): art critic, curator, instructor, and friend and contributor to Daily Serving and our sister publication Art Practical. It is an understatement to say that Leigh was admired; she was loved in the way that only great mentors and friends are loved—fiercely, and without reservation. What follows are brief remembrances of a few of her former students[…..]