Articles

Transformations – Death, Breakage, and the Unexpected

David Ireland. Angel-Go-Round, 1996; fiberglass, cast concrete figures and motor; 180 x 191 x 191 in. Courtesy of di Rosa collection, Napa. Photo: Israel Valencia.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a recent installment of “Notes from di Rosa,” a column produced in conjunction with Art Practical’s yearlong residency at the museum. In this edition, author Terri Cohn explores the collection and its legacy. This article was originally published on October 8, 2014. Beautiful, bucolic, and quiet, di Rosa stretches out over its 200 acres with obvious and[…..]

From the Archives – #Hashtags: The Squeezing of the Middle Class Gallery

Tracey Snelling. "Mystery Hour," Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco, CA, December 19, 2013 - February 1, 2014. Photo credit: John Janca. Courtesy of the artist and Rena Bransten Gallery.

Today from our archives, we bring you an essay that’s ripe for reconsideration. Though San Francisco—like many other cities—has seen the closing of several mid-level galleries in the last few years, recent events have been more hopeful. There are at least two new art spaces in the city, and this weekend more than 3,500 artists and patrons successfully turned their cooperative efforts toward funding The Lab during a live 24-hour[…..]

Landscape: The Virtual, The Actual, The Possible? at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Changi, Singapore

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Scott Norton reviews Landscape: The Virtual, The Actual, The Possible? at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. For much of art history, seventeenth-century[…..]

Sarah Oppenheimer at Mills College Art Museum

Sarah Oppenheimer, 2014; installation view, Mills College Art Museum. Courtesy of the Artist and Mills College Art Museum.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you Lea Feinstein’s review of Sarah Oppenheimer’s current solo show at Mills College Art Museum. Feinstein notes: “[Oppenheimer] creates immersive experiences for participants, in which literal reflections inspire personal reflection and wondering is a product of wandering. […] But without hours of serious research before seeing the exhibition, it is difficult to parse the scope or significance of her installations from[…..]

Fan Mail: Laura Moore

Laura Moore.  One Man's Junk, (ongoing series) 2014; hand carved Indiana Limestone; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Paul Cimoroni.

From the height of a pedestrian bridge over a railroad track in Toronto, artist Laura Moore saw the remains of a computer monitor gazing screen- or face-up at her from the tracks. The happenstance experience provoked a number of questions about contemporary society’s rapidly changing relationship and progressive entanglement with technology. Mainly the artist wondered: Why was this monitor marched up a steep set of[…..]

The Heart Is Not a Metaphor: Robert Gober at MoMA

Robert Gober. Installation view of Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar. Courtesy of the artist and The Museum of Modern Art.

The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, the first large-scale survey of Robert Gober’s career to take place in the United States, is a testament to the breadth of the artist’s provocative articulation of those moments of cultural past that linger in the corners of peripheral vision—a lingering that keeps one unsettled. Queered, uncanny objects of the everyday radiate the trauma of the half-remembered event. In Gober’s untitled piece from 1997,[…..]

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists at the SCAD Museum of Art

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists, installation view, SCAD Museum of Art. Franck Abd-Bakar Fanny, Another Day without You, 2013; five c-prints mounted on disec; 39 ½ x 70 ¾ inches each. Ghada Amer, The Blue Bra Girls, 2012; stainless steel; 72 x 62 ¼ x 54 inches. Lamia Naji, Immaculé, 2011; six c-prints mounted on Dibond; 45 ¼ x 61 inches each. Courtesy of SCAD Museum of Art, photo by Marc Newton.

The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists at the SCAD Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, is an ambitious show, but originally I pondered the reason for viewing the work of African artists through a lens of an archetype of Western literature, The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri. While such an endeavor may not seem particularly edifying at the outset,[…..]