Articles

Fan Mail: Cristina Burns

Christina Burns. Haunted Mansion, 2014; photograph; 20 x 27 ½ inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Cristina Burns’ work offers a poised and humorous vision of a world measured more by twisted fantasy than by the so-called sanity we are all so accustomed to assuming. Working primarily in photography, the artist creates works reminiscent of seventeenth-century European cabinets of curiosity, museums of medical and anthropological oddities, and children’s books, cartoons, and playthings—her photographs ooze a cloyingly saccharine Rococo sensibility that is[…..]

Anicka Yi: You Can Call Me F at The Kitchen

Anicka Yi. Installation view of You Can Call Me F at The Kithcen in New York City , 2015.

At the entrance to the black box of the Kitchen’s upstairs gallery, a long vitrine houses an illuminated culture of bacteria on agar jelly. The cracked slab teems with biological entities colored like bruises on sallow skin. Imprinted with capital letters, it reads: YOU CAN CALL ME F. Anicka Yi’s current solo show stages part breeding ground, part containment camp for “F”—the feminine, the woman[…..]

Jenni Olson: The Royal Road

Jenni Olson. The Royal Road; 2015 (still). 16mm/HD; 65:00 min. Courtesy of Jenni Olson Productions.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Sean Uyehara’s review of The Royal Road by Jenni Olson. Uyehara notes that the film echoes “…dreams, those deferred and distorted forms of wish fulfillment, where the destination is never reached and that inevitably lead back to the thorny, tangled territory of the unconscious.” This article was originally published on March 12, 2015. Jenni Olson’s second feature-length narrative[…..]

Doris Salcedo at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Doris Salcedo, Atrabiliarios (detail), 1992-2004. Installation view, Doris Salcedo, MCA Chicago. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Accessions Committee Fund purchase:gift of Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein, Patricia and Raoul Kennedy, Elaine McKeon, Lisa and John Miller, Chara Schreyer and Gordon Freund, and Robin Wright. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

The fourth floor of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago is typically an airy space with high ceilings and ample skylights, but currently it is crowded with an overabundance of furniture. Visitors are greeted with the pleasant mineral smell of dirt and a dense maze of wooden tables. The lighting is diffuse, almost grayed, and the galleries take on the look of a luminous dusk,[…..]

Help Desk: Put the Artist First

Rachel Reupke. Still from Letter of Complaint, 2015; color video, 10 min.

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. In the role of writer and curator, I find myself playing bureaucratic middle man between artists and the public, or artists and institutions. But, where it comes to performing the role well, which comes procedurally first—the artist[…..]

Shaping Abstraction at the de Young Museum in San Francisco

Oskar Fischinger. Rhythmic Tapestry, 1952; oil on canvas; 17 1/4 x 22 1/8 in. Courtesy of the Harriet and Maurice Gregg Collection of American Abstract Art and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Emily Swaim reviews Shaping Abstraction at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, California. Full disclosure—I have embarrassingly little education in abstract art. In fact, I chose[…..]

Janet Delaney: South of Market at the de Young Museum

Janet Delaney. Bulk Natural Foods, Russ at Howard Street, 1980; archival pigment print. Image courtesy of the Artist. © 2014 Janet Delaney

Today from our partners at Art Practical we bring you a review of Janet Delaney’s photographs, on view at the de Young Museum in San Francisco through July 19, 2015. Author Glen Helfand explains that the power of these images lies not just in themselves: “Delaney’s exhibition becomes a social space for the exchange of memory and the erratic flow of time in the city, and[…..]