Articles

Ludovic Duchâteau: In Dreamland at A Stark Project

Ludovic Duchateau. In Dreamland, 2016; installation view, A Stark Project, Berkeley. Courtesy of the Artist and A Stark Project. Photo: Hillary Goidell.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Noah Sudarsky reviews Ludovic Duchâteau: In Dreamland at A Stark Project in Berkeley. French sculptor Ludovic Duchâteau’s first solo show in the[…..]

Manifesto at the Park Avenue Armory

Julian Rosefeldt. Manifesto, 2015; installation view, Park Avenue Armory, New York. Courtesy of Park Avenue Armory. Photo: James Ewing.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bai Yuting reviews Julian Rosefeldt: Manifesto the Park Avenue Armory. This winter, the Park Avenue Armory presents the German cinematographer Julian Rosefeldt’s thirteen-channel video installation, Manifesto (2015).[…..]

Soulèvements (Uprisings) at the Jeu de Paume

Dennis Adams. Patriot, 2002; C-print mounted on aluminum; 40.5 x 54 in. Courtesy of Centre National des Arts Plastiques, Paris. Photo: Galerie Gabrielle Maubrie.

What if the imagination made mountains rise up? Georges Didi-Huberman poses this question in Soulèvements (Uprisings), a new exhibition at the Jeu de Paume National Gallery in Paris. Throughout the museum’s galleries, contemporary artworks, books, historical documents, and photographs present a potent survey on the theme of social rebellions in the West, ranging from Victor Hugo’s call for the abolition of the death penalty (in[…..]

La Biennale de Montréal: Le Grand Balcon at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal

Anne Imhof. Angst III, 2016; performance. Courtesy of La Biennale de Montréal. Photo: Jonas Leihener

There is admittedly a little bit of confusion when one arrives at La Biennale de Montréal’s main venue, the Musée d’Art Contemporain (MAC), for a great part of the biennale does not in fact take place at the MAC. With eighteen satellite venues beyond walking distance and inaccurate information from its front-line stewards, trekking through extreme winter conditions in the land of the tragic 19th-century[…..]

Odd Jobs: Danielle Dean

Danielle Dean. Hexafluorosilicic, 2015; installation view at Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles. Courtesy of the artist.

Welcome back to Odd Jobs, where artists talk about their varied and nontraditional career arcs. For this installment, I spoke to Danielle Dean—born to a Nigerian father and an English mother in Alabama—whose interdisciplinary practice draws from this multinational background. Her work explores the interpellation of thoughts, feelings, and social relations by power structures working through news, advertising, political speech, and digital media. She has[…..]

Happy New Year!

2016 was an exceptional year for Daily Serving! We celebrated our tenth anniversary and Michele Carlson became our new executive director. We inaugurated “Odd Jobs,” a new interviews column regarding art and labor, and covered major art-world stories like Pedro Reyes’ Doomocracy and Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016, at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel. Of course, we also turned an assessing eye to exhibitions in cities such as Birmingham, Dhaka, Nashville, Mexico City,[…..]

Best of 2016 – Kapwani Kiwanga: Ujamaa

Kapwani Kiwanga. White Gold: Morogoro, 2016; installation; 236 x 196 x 157 in. Courtesy of La Ferme du Buisson. Photo: Emile Ouroumov.

As we look back over a decade of the best in arts writing, our final selection comes from our communication manager, Jackie Clay: “This year I would estimate that I’ve read nearly 90% of Daily Serving‘s articles from beginning to end. This one stuck with me. As deftly described by Marisol Rodriguez, artist Kapwani Kiwanga’s solo exhibition, Ujamaa was an open-ended, but not opaque love[…..]