Articles

Do It & Do It (Archive) at the Napa Valley Museum

Alison Knowles. Homage to Each Red Thing, 1996. Photo: Glen Helfand.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Glen Helfand‘s review of Do It & Do It (Archive), a survey of relational aesthetics now on view at the Napa Valley Museum. The author notes that this iteration of the exhibition “…seems a bit more community-minded, offering an entertaining and edifying entry to conceptualism for locals and adventurous, well-heeled visitors who have a little[…..]

Fan Mail: John Tierney

John Tierney. Elvis is on the Building, Palm Springs, 2013; oil on canvas; 20 x 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

John Tierney’s paintings have a distinct relationship to cinema. Hollywood, California, and the greater Los Angeles area are awash in a rich and intense light that seems to linger over everything with an endless glow, a light as potent as the dreams and realities of fame and stardom promised by the movie companies that populate the city. For a representational painter such as Tierney, the[…..]

Philippe Parreno: H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS at the Park Avenue Armory

Philippe Parreno. H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS, 2015; installation view, Park Avenue Armory, New York. Photo: James Ewing.

In Philippe Parreno’s current exhibition, H {N)Y P N(Y} OSIS at the Park Avenue Armory, Danny the Street is a sprawling installation based on a DC Comics character who is a sentient stretch of roadway. The character Danny periodically inserts himself into the architecture of different cities, communicating via puffs of manhole smoke. In Parreno’s installation, Danny has inserted himself inside the Armory as a series[…..]

Ten Years Gone at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Willie Birch. Crawfish Dwelling. 2009. Bronze. 6 x 5.5 x 4 inches. Image courtesy of Willie Birch and the Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans, LA.

In the aftermath of a catastrophe, memorialization and remembrance are inevitably tied to forms of forgetting. These often take the shape of reactionary modes that proclaim an urgent desire to smooth over the eruptive, unresolved conflicts that shape our collective past and place them into digestible modes of representation.[1] However, for the communities that bear witness to the impact of a disastrous event, forgetting is[…..]

Help Desk: Selling Out

Installation view: Tony Conrad. Two Degrees of Separation, Kunsthalle Wien 2014, Photo: Stephan Wyckoff: Grommet Horn, ca. 1970, Replik 2014, Courtesy the artist and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. I am a painter who rarely makes any money directly from my work. Recently a design firm approached me about a project that involves artists painting on small refrigerators from which energy drinks will[…..]

Synecdoche at Jessica Silverman Gallery

Tony Lewis. Automatic, 2015; Pencil, graphite powder and tape on paper; 83 3/4 x 71 1/2 in. Courtesy of the Artist; Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago; Massimo De Carlo, London/Milan, and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Hana Metzger reviews Synecdoche at Jessica Silverman Gallery in San Francisco.  Synecdoche, an exhibition at Jessica Silverman Gallery featuring twelve works by five artists, borrows its[…..]

Lorna Mills and Her Subversive GIF Art

Lorna Mills. Abrupt Diplomat (still from GIF), 2015. Courtesy of Transfer Gallery.

From our friends at Canadian Art, today we bring you a feature on the Toronto-based artist Lorna Mills. Author Simon Lewsen (@SimonLewsen) notes, “The intensity of Mills’ art is rooted not just in the proliferation of images but also in their strange choreography.” This article was originally published on July 1, 2015. In the fall of 2014, Lorna Mills, the Toronto-based net artist, was exhibiting[…..]