Articles

Summer Session – Guerrilla Girls Talk the History of Art vs. the History of Power

Today for our Summer Session topic of celebrity, we bring you an interview from The Late Show with Stephen Colbert with the feminist art activists the Guerrilla Girls. Colbert and the Guerrilla Girls talk about the ways in which institutional power limits the possibilities for representation in museums and galleries, thereby shaping the narrative of art history and also popular taste. Moreover, the interview itself is[…..]

Summer Session – The Dark Side of Mickey Mouse: Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum

Llyn Foulkes. The Lost Frontier, 1997–2005; mixed media; 87 x 96 x 8 in. Courtesy of the artist and The New Museum

For this Summer Session topic of celebrity, today we bring you Allegra Kirkland’s review of the 2013 Llyn Foulkes retrospective at the New Museum. Across all of his multi- and mixed-media works, Foulkes’ oeuvre holds a special fascination for the hollow promises of fame implicit in American popular figures, like Mickey Mouse and Clark Kent. His heavily textured style viscerally manifests the darkness beneath the saccharine[…..]

Summer Session – ART THOUGHTZ: How To Be A Successful Artist

For this Summer Session topic of celebrity, we bring you a video from Hennessy Youngman, creator of the satirical YouTube series ART THOUGHTZ. In this clip, Youngman outlines the core criteria for becoming a commercially successful artist—a short list of requirements that might be funnier if they were not so true. This video was originally uploaded on May 2, 2010.

Summer Session – Art and Film

Harmony Korine. Spring Breakers, 2013 (film still); 01:34:00. Courtesy of Spring Breakers LLC and A24 Films.

This Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, and today we bring you a piece by celebrity James Franco from our sister publication Art Practical on his role in various art films, especially Spring Breakers (2013). Here, Franco attempts to tease out the intersections of commercial and art film projects from the inside, simultaneously offering a meta-narrative on the self-referentiality of his collaborations while enacting it himself. This article was originally published on July[…..]

Summer Session – The Artist Using Meat to Deform and Deconstruct Celebrity

James Ostrer. Emotion Download 213M, 2016, from The Ego System series; photograph; 101 x 67cm. Courtesy of the Artist.

For this Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, and today we’re considering the divide between the promise and the reality of celebrity influence. Over at Dazed, Thomas Gorton has penned a review of artist James Ostrer’s series The Ego System, a set of portraits of famous figures made out of meat and viscera. Ostrer’s work is an attempt to refuse the glamor of celebrity, and to remind himself that[…..]

Summer Session – Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera Since 1870

Alison Jackson. The Queen plays with her Corgies, from the series Confidential, 2007; chromogenic print; 16 x 12 in. Courtesy the Artist and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles. © Alison Jackson.

For today’s Summer Session topic of celebrity, we bring you Genevieve Quick’s review from our sister publication Art Practical of the 2010 SFMOMA exhibition Exposed, a show on the history of photography and the camera. Our contemporary fascination with celebrities is heavily shaped by the photographic medium, and Exposed explored some of the earliest iterations of the iconic paparazzi shot that is a quintessential celebrity experience. This review was originally published[…..]

Summer Session – Art & Vexation: Interview with William Powhida

William Powhida, Cynical Advice, 2012. Graphite, colored pencil, and watercolor on paper, Cynical Advice, 15” x 20”, Graphite, colored pencil, and watercolor on paper, 15 x 20 inches

For this Summer Session we’re thinking about celebrity, and that also means thinking about what it means to both loathe and desire its effects for oneself. There is no denying that the art world is often driven by the forces of celebrity, and William Powhida makes the core of his practice a thorough critique of this system. His work responds to the ambivalent desire for status[…..]