Articles

Flavr Savr* at the Pit

Lynn Hershman Leeson. GMO Animals, Crops, Labs (The Infinity Engine), 2014; wallpaper; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and the Pit.

The Pit, a small artist-run gallery, sits semi-hidden in a commercial and industrial neighborhood north of Los Angeles. Artists Devon Oder and Adam Miller founded the gallery in 2014, exhibiting emerging artists in tightly curated group shows alongside at least one well-established artist. The Pit, located in a converted car mechanic’s garage, has the same anonymously beige exterior as the neighboring businesses. But its out-of-the-way[…..]

Take This Hammer: Art + Media Activism from the Bay Area at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Take This Hammer: Art + Media Activism from the Bay Area, installation view, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Left: Oree Originol. Justice for Our Lives, 2014-ongoing. Right: Cat Brooks with Black Lives Matter. Anti Police-Terror Project, ‘Tasha,’ 2015. Courtesy of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. Photo: Charlie Villyard.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you editor Emily Holmes’ review of Take This Hammer at YBCA in San Francisco. Holmes notes, “Although there is crossover between works, particularly in regard to the social issues they address, violence is perhaps the single thread running through all of Take This Hammer. […] It takes many forms, but the exhibition particularly exposes systemic inequities and state-sanctioned[…..]

From the Archives – Time After Time: The Clock at SFMOMA

Christian Marclay, video still from The Clock, 2010; single-channel video with stereo sound, 24 hours; courtesy the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. All photos from Christian Marclay: The Clock; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

In June 2013, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art closed its doors to begin a massive expansion project. This weekend is the first public reopening of the museum, which now holds the status of the largest museum (by square footage) dedicated to modern art. Today we bring you a flashback to those last few hours at SFMOMA three years ago, when Christian Marclay’s The Clock[…..]

Be the Kill-Joy: Interview with DarkMatter

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Today, from our friends at Guernica, we bring you an interview with queer South Asian performance-art duo DarkMatter. Author Kevin St. John says of their performance at Mercury Lounge, “The evening’s performance at times resembled a political rally, a downtown drag act, an agit-prop polemic, a stand-up routine, and a traditional poetry reading. The duo performed much of the text together, talking over one another, jumping[…..]

Fan Mail: Alexander Heffesse

Alexander Heffesse. Sanitary Wipe (Large), 2016; solid surface, epoxy, paper towel, nylon strap, stand; 12 x 5 x 11 in. Photo by Adele Schelling.

With a background in architecture, it’s no surprise that Brooklyn-based artist Alexander Heffesse works so well with space. Heffesse engages with installation as a construction site, his point of departure being the idea of the construction worker as an artisan figure engaged in the act of creating. Noticing the proliferation of empty Gatorade bottles at construction sites, Heffesse drew a connection between social economics and[…..]

Carmen Argote: Mansión Magnolia at Shulamit Nazarian

Carmen Argote. Black Chairs, 2016; archival inkjet print; 58 x 80 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Shulamit Nazarian.

Expressions of both individual psychology and grand family histories are easily found in the architecture of a past home. These two narratives are counterintuitive yet closely related. When a family invests in a house, apartment, or some shared space, its interiors, like one’s mind, can feel simultaneously claustrophobic and inexhaustibly complex, and revisiting a former home can bring up fraught confrontations with descendants and sentimentality.[…..]

Robert Irwin: All the Rules Will Change at the Hirshhorn Museum

Robert Irwin. Bed of Roses, 1962; ©2016 Robert Irwin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Robert Irwin has had a number of distinct careers as an artist, each with a distinct group of peers and beliefs. All the Rules Will Change presents the best known but least seen of these careers: the studio painter of the 1960s, who began the decade as a conventional Abstract Expressionist, and ended it by closing his studio and abandoning a practice of painting that[…..]