Articles

Summer Reading – Mapping New Orleans: The Broadsides of Unfathomable City

"Bass Lines: Deep Sounds and Soils" from the book Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas. Map concept by Joshua Jelly-Schapiro and Rebecca Snedeker, cartography by Jakob Rosenzweig, artwork by Katie Holten, and design by Lia Tjandra.

As the editors at Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts of our[.....]

Summer Reading: The Unlearning

Paulo Bruscky. Xeroperformance, 1980; Super 8 film on video. All images courtesy Galeria Nara Roesler

As the editors at Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts of our[.....]

Wynne Neilly: Female to “Male” at Ryerson Image Centre

Wynne Neilly. January 24th 2014-24th Shot, 2014; Fuji Instax Film; 4 ¼ x 3 ¼ in. Courtesy of the Artist and Ryerson Image Centre. Photo: Wynne Neilly.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Shauna Jean Doherty reviews Wynne Neilly: Female to “Male” at Ryerson Image Centre in Toronto. Through a collection of archival documents, personal photos,[.....]

How to Make a Non-Didactic Video

Camille Henrot. Grosse Fatigue, 2013; Video: color, sound, 13 min. © ADAGP Camille Henrot. Courtesy the artist, Silex Films and kamel mennour, Paris.

Today from our friends at Glasstire, we bring you Joshua Fischer’s assessment of two videos currently on view in Houston, Texas. Instead of comparing works in the same exhibition, Fischer reviews videos by the artists Hito Steyerl and Camille Henrot in two different shows and defines the likenesses between them. He notes, “Steyerl and Henrot may have different outlooks and approaches [...] but luckily they share[.....]

Fan Mail: Matt Shallenberger

Matt Shallenberger. 2735 from the series False Pond, 2014; archival pigment print; 32 x 40 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Matt Shallenberger approaches his photographic subjects—most often landscapes—as a cartographer approaches a new territory. As he discovers information by following the sight lines of mountains, rivers, boundaries, horizons, and the ever-changing position of the sun or the moon, he always takes into account the history and prior records of his subjects. While he works consistently with darkened, blissfully moody vistas, Shallenberger’s research into his subjects[.....]

Matt Sheridan Smith: Widow – Fig. 3 Ep. 1 at Hannah Hoffman Gallery

Matt Sheridan Smith. Widow – Fig. 3 Ep. 1, installation view. Courtesy of the artist and Hannah Hoffman Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Joshua White

Matt Sheridan Smith’s current exhibition at Hannah Hoffman Gallery is a portrait show, but not in the conventional sense. Instead of painted likenesses of his subject (there is one representational image; more on that later), Sheridan Smith uses pattern, abstraction, and the readymade to create what he dubs “a sort of speculative portraiture.”[1] Evocative and confounding rather than illuminating, the works in the show obscure[.....]

Artist Project: Jack + Leigh Ruby’s Car Wash Incident

Jack + Leigh Ruby. Matt's Convenience Store Robbery, evidentiary photo 21; 1975. Courtesy of the Artists. Photo: Leigh Ruby.

Today from our friends at Art Practical, we bring you an essay by Simon Lee and Eve Sussman about “the intersection of and differences between entertainment and art.” This article was originally published on July 9, 2014. I’ve been a fan of Eve Sussman’s work from the first moment I watched her film Rape of the Sabine Women (2007) during a screening at the San Francisco Museum[.....]