Articles

Summer Session – #Hashtags: Culture, Class and the New Economy

Michal Wisniowski. "Guard Secrets" Google Bus, 2014. Digital image. Submission to Mission Local's "Bedazzle a Tech Bus" Call for Entries.

The first theme in our Summer Session series is labor, and today we’re revisiting Anuradha Vikram’s essay on the so-called creative economy and its effects: “The mythology of the creative economy explains much of why San Franciscans who have pioneered this approach to work are under-invested in the arts despite some apparent affinities. Why support artists with your hard-earned income when you are fully convinced you[…..]

Summer Session – Jobs Suck and Art Rules: Today I Made Nothing at Elizabeth Dee

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Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we bring you Michael Tomeo’s review of Today I Made Nothing at Elizabeth Dee Gallery in New York City. This article was originally published on August 23, 2010.  I’m so over jobs right now. Sure, we need them, we’re thankful for the paycheck and it’s fun to hang out with coworkers (sometimes), but let’s face it, jobs blow.  While the total[…..]

Summer Session – Material Practices: Stitching, Fabric, and Textiles in the Work of Contemporary Chinese Artists

Lin Tianmiao, Badges, 2011-12, White silk, colored silk thread, painted stainless steel embroidery frame, sound component, Installation, dimensions variable. Individual diameters of 55, 80, 100, and 120 cm. Image courtesy the artist

Continuing our June Summer Session theme of labor, today we bring you this review that deals with gendered, often invisible labor. Author Luise Guest explores the work of several contemporary Chinese artists using embroidery in revolutionary ways. This article was originally published on January 10, 2014. Mao Zedong once said that revolution is not a dinner party. Less famously, he said it is not embroidery, either. Interestingly,[…..]

Summer Session – Proximities 3: Import/Export at the Asian Art Museum

Imin Yeh, Paper Bag Project, 2013; Handmade paper bag; 15 x 12 x 6 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

From our sister publication Art Practical, today we bring you the next installment of our Summer Session—for June, we’re considering the idea of labor. Author Heidi Rabben assesses the exhibition Proximities 3: Import/Export at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco and notes that it “provocatively address[es] the larger issue of material and immaterial labor across transactional flows.” This article was originally published on February 17, 2014. Proximities 3:[…..]

Summer Session – Women’s Work at Smith College Museum of Art

Mierle Laderman Ukeles. Dressing to Go Out/Undressing to Go In, 1973 (printed 1998); 95 black-and-white photographs mounted on foamcore with chain and dustrag; 57-5/16 x 44-7/16 in. Courtesy of Smith College Art Museum, purchased with the Judith Plesser Targan, class of 1953, Fund.

Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we bring you Lia Wilson’s thoughtful, thorough review of Women’s Work: Feminist Art From the Collection at Smith College Museum of Art. This article was originally published on October 29, 2015.   The exhibition Women’s Work is constructed within a historical frame. All of the included artists are introduced as individuals prominent in second-wave feminism, defined as a past[…..]

Summer Session – Simon Denny: The Innovator’s Dilemma at MoMA PS1

Simon Denny. New Management, 2014; installation view, Portikus, Frankfurt. Photo: Helena Schlichting. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Labor is the first theme in our Summer Session series, and today we’re looking back at Alex Bigman’s review of The Innovator’s Dilemma at MoMA PS1, an exhibition by Simon Denny that addresses innovation, promotion, the tech industry, and “the international echo chamber of startup discourse.” This article was originally published on June 25, 2015. Startup culture is ripe for satire. The tech industry’s social and economic[…..]

Summer Session: Mika Rottenberg by Judith Hudson

Mika Rottenberg. Still from Squeeze, 2010; digital C-print, single-channel video installation. Total running time: 20 minutes.

Today from our friends at BOMB Magazine, we bring you an excerpt from Judith Hudson’s interview with Mika Rottenberg. In keeping with our Summer Session theme of labor, the artist discusses multitasking, migrant workers, energy, and the value of sweat. This interview was originally published in the Autumn 2010 issue of BOMB. Video-installation artist Mika Rottenberg creates mini-factories, farms, and tableaux, which produce products variously made[…..]