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From the Archives – Archive State at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College

Akram Zaatari, Dance to the End of Love, 2011; four-channel video installation; 22 mins. Installation view at MUSAC. Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Hamburg/Beirut.

Today from our archives, we bring you a (re)consideration of an exhibition about archives. Author Liz Glass analyzes the work that was on view at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in 2014 and notes, “By re-presenting these events from recent history through […] fragmentary views, the exhibition reaffirms the tension between the body politic and the individual body, while posturing toward a way of writing history that is aggregate, collective,[…..]

Jean Conner: Collages at Gallery Paule Anglim

Jean Conner. Untitled (Mother Daughter), 1980; paper collage; 13½ x 9¾ in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Paule Anglim.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Jean Conner’s collages at Gallery Paule Anglim in San Francisco. Catch this show if you can! Author Genevieve Quick calls the artist’s work “strongly provocative” and notes, “[Conner’s] confidence and skill in selection, placement, and juxtaposition… create surprising amounts of visual play, leading to strong formal compositions and intriguing ideas.” This article[…..]

Fan Mail: Willie Stewart

Willie Stewart. The Love You Withhold is the Pain that You Carry, 2014. Installation view kijidome, Boston, MA. Courtesy of kijidome and the Artist.

Willie Stewart incorporates a broad range of complex, mundane, strange, and dark subject matter and cultural references into his work. His interests and references include extraterrestrials, biker gangs and punk rock groups, German artist Kurt Schwitters’s Merzbau (1931–33), Mike Kelley’s book The Uncanny, and cult films such as Lloyd Kaufman’s Toxic Avenger (1984). Stewart’s sculptures, installations, videos, photographs, and photocollages are all individual works, but each[…..]

Tomi Ungerer: All in One at the Drawing Center

2.	Tomi Ungerer. Untitled (drawing for The Party), 1966; ink and ink wash on paper;
18 x 18 in. Courtesy of the Collection Musée Tomi Ungerer – Centre
international de l’Illustration, Strasbourg. Photo: Musées de la Ville de Strasbourg/Mathieu Bertola.

Tomi Ungerer: All in One, now on view at the Drawing Center, is a joyful retrospective of the artist’s career as children’s-book author, satirical cartoonist, political illustrator, and erotic artist. Sadly it’s also incredibly timely. Because though Ungerer was a beloved illustrator, he was also rejected for the explicit imagery in his political and erotic work. As we engage in a global conversation about shock[…..]

Room Full of Mirrors: The Dazzling Life And Legacy Of Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian

Monir. Lightning for Neda, 2009; Courtesy the Artist and The Third Line

Today from our friends at REORIENT, we bring you an excerpt from Nicola Baird‘s feature on the life and work of artist Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian. Baird explains, “Monir’s works present a world wherein everything is moving to transformative effect.” This article was originally published on January 5, 2015; an exhibition of Monir’s works will open in New York at the Guggenheim on March 13, 2015. The artist[…..]

William Binnie: Flame as Flag at Paul Loya Gallery

William Binnie. Untitled (Mill), 2014. Bleach on denim. 18 x 24 inches. Courtesy of Paul Loya Gallery.

William Binnie’s exhibition at Paul Loya Gallery in Culver City emerged from a residency granted to the Dallas-based artist by the Rauschenberg Foundation in Captiva, Florida, this past summer. While there, the artist made a series of paintings in bleach on denim drawn from photographs of fires set by political radicals. Binnie’s paintings merge Rauschenberg’s photo-transfer aesthetic with Andy Warhol’s fascination with media spectacle—the grimmer, the better.[…..]

Help Desk: Interviews & Expectations

Julia Wachtel. Bleep, 2014; 60 x 73" 152.4cm x 185.4cm oil, flashe, acrylic ink on canvas

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. I have an interview with a critic who sent me his questions in advance, and I found them to be leading and directive. How can I approach this type of conversation in a way[…..]