Articles

Wages for Facebook at Kadist Art Foundation

Laurel Ptak (left) and Christina Linden (right).

Last Wednesday, Kadist Art Foundation and curator Christina Linden hosted a conversation with artist Laurel Ptak, the author/founder of Wages for Facebook, a manifesto (based on the 1975 manifesto Wages Against Housework) that calls for a reconsideration of what it means to participate in a system of for-profit social exchange. To a packed house, Ptak began her talk by showing slides of publications that have printed information, opinions, and reactions to[.....]

Paradise Lost at the Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore

Trinh T. Minh-ha. Surname Viet Given Name Nam, 1989 (film still); 16mm; 108 min. Courtesy of Moongift Films.

“Southern Asia, in general, is the seat of awful images and associations. As the cradle of the human race, it would alone have a dim and reverential feeling connected with it… [the] mere antiquity of Asiatic things, of their institutions, histories, modes of faith, &c., is so impressive, that to me the vast age of the race and name overpowers the sense of youth in[.....]

RR&P: Repetition, Rhythm, and Pattern at Lewis Art Gallery

L to R:  Corey Escoto, Wheel of Fortune: I’d Like to Solve the Puzzle, 2010, digital prints, frames, plexiglass, 49” x 135”; Corey Escoto, House of Cards, n.d., pleximounted digital prints, wax balls, approx. 35” x 45”; Lilly Zuckerman, 6”x4.5”x3”, 4”x4”x3”, and 5”x3”x3.5”, 2012, porcelain. Courtesy of Lindsey Landfried. Photo: Lindsey Landfried.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Melissa Thorson Hause reviews RR&P: Repetition, Rhythm, and Pattern at the Lewis Art Gallery at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. A century ago, avant-garde art dealer Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler asserted[.....]

Cullen Washington Jr.: The Land Before Words at 808 Gallery

Untitled #4
2013
Canvas, paper, tape, found materials
7.5 x 7

From our friends at Big Red & Shiny, today we bring you a review of Cullen Washington Jr.’s paintings at 808 Gallery at Boston University’s College of Fine Arts. Author Shawn Hill points out, “Washington has embraced the American tradition of the readymade (Duchamp) and junk art (Kienholz) in creating these paintings, which draw from the past but refer to the still-charged state of race relations and[.....]

Yarn Trails: Visual Resonance Among Three Exhibitions in Chicago

Detail of Academic Connections: Media Atlas, 2014, an undertaking of Professor W.J.T. Mitchell’s Theories of Media class students, in a gallery at the Smart Museum of the University of Chicago. Photo: Saul Rosenfield.

The typical museum experience is controlled. A pathway describes a route from one artwork to another, each illustrated by its label and narrated by an audio tour. However, three exhibitions currently on view in Chicago invite the visitor to engage in a less predictable process. At the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art, visual-culture scholar W.J.T. Mitchell and the students of his “Theories of[.....]

Nicolas Lobo: Bad Soda/Soft Drunk at Gallery Diet

Get Nexcited! So beckons the label of Nexcite, an aphrodisiac beverage once produced in Sweden. When it first came out in the early 2000s in the United States, it was sold under the moniker Niagara, and it was wildly popular. Shortly afterward, Pfizer filed a lawsuit claiming copyright infringement (the name is similar to Viagra), forcing the beverage to be renamed Nexcite. It was never able[.....]

Art(ists) on the Verge at the Soap Factory

Katie Hargrave, In Poor Tastes Good, 2014; mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy The Soap Factory. Photo by Lillian Egner.

Now through April, the sprawling, rough-and-tumble brick spaces of Minneapolis’ Soap Factory are filled with installation projects by five artists—the Art(ists) on the Verge, as it were. It is not quite fair to consider Art(ists) on the Verge as a single exhibition, as there is no curatorial or artistic conceit to cement the various projects into a cohesive entity. The works on view are the[.....]