Fan Mail: Ashley Pastore

Ashley Pastore. Real Women Make Their Mark; pen, tea, cut magazine; 40 x 32 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Ashley Pastore has a thing for old science and life magazines. Poring over dated issues of National Geographic, Pastore has come to appreciate the visual aesthetic and color palette of print from the ’50s to ’80s, which she describes as being rich, deep, and full-bodied. After scouring Craigslist and rummaging through random thrift stores, the artist now has a sizable collection of vintage magazines that[…..]

Women’s Work at Smith College Museum of Art

Guerilla Girls. The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist from Guerilla Girls, Most Wanted, 1985–2006, 1988; lithograph printed in black on paper, 17 x 22-1/8 in. Courtesy of Smith College Art Museum, purchased with the gift of the Fred Bergfors and Margaret Sandberg Foundation.

The exhibition Women’s Work is constructed within a historical frame. All of the included artists are introduced as individuals prominent in second-wave feminism, defined as a past era from the 1960s through the 1980s, a period with a beginning and an end. It cannot be denied that a great deal has changed in both feminist thought and social mores since then. Third-wave feminism called out[…..]

Sheila Pree Bright: 1960Now at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia

Sheila Pree Bright. BringIt, 2015; chalkboard. 1960Now, installation view, The Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia. Courtesy of the Artist.

1960Now, on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia, is an expansion of photographer Sheila Pree Bright’s continued interest in naming and documenting the unknown leaders of African American social movements: the influential agitators, groundbreakers, and activists whose names might not have been Rosa, Martin, or Malcolm. In her latest photographic project, Bright points to a new generation of faces experiencing frustrations and[…..]

UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015 at the Hammer Museum

Frances Stark. Bobby Jesus’s Alma Mater b/w Reading the Book of David	and/or Paying Attention Is Free, 2013; multichannel projection with sound, inkjet 	mural, and takeaway offset posters; 7:20 min. Installation view, Carnegie International, 2013. Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Conley.

In a mid-career survey as large as UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991–2015, on view at the Hammer Museum, I’m usually tempted to rush over a couple of galleries and maybe even skip a video here or there. From the get-go, Stark’s exhibition, featuring 125 drawings, collages, paintings, and video installations, had me enthralled with My Best Thing (2011), a 100-minute-long episodic animation based on the artist’s[…..]

From the Archive – Help Desk: A Spark in the Dark

Rezi van Lankveld.

As our intrepid columnist continues to traverse through Warsaw, we bring a piece of advice for all those that are finding their way in through the muddy path we call “art.” If you’re stumbling through the dark or feeling alone in your efforts, keep your chin up! Let this be the light to guide your way. Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here.

Machine Project: Selections from Mr. Akita

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Today from our friends at Machine Project in Los Angeles, we bring you a video of selections from Mr. Akita, a play by Asher Hartman starring artist and comedian Cliff Hengst. Mr. Akita was performed at the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery as part of Machine Project: The Platinum Collection on September 26 and 27, 2015.

Özlem Altin at Kiria Koula

Özlem Altin. Sleeping statue, 2013; print on litho paper; 27 ½ x 22 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Kiria Koula, San Francisco. Photo: John White.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Özlem Altin’s current solo show at Kiria Koula in San Francisco. Author Zachary Royer Scholz declares: “Özlem Altin’s exhibition at Kiria Koula is a wonderful rarity. It does not present viewers with clear answers because it is not the finished result of an exploration. It is an exploration in progress, in which viewers participate—a generous[…..]