Articles

Beverly Buchanan: And You May Find Yourself… at Andrew Edlin Gallery

Beverly Buchanan. Old Colored School, 2010; wood and paint; 20.25 x 14.75 x 18.5 in (51.4 x 37.5 x 47 cm). Courtesy Andrew Edlin Gallery.

Though certainly no stranger to the art world, Beverly Buchanan has followed an unusual trajectory in her career and public profile as an artist. Born in 1940 in North Carolina, and raised in South Carolina, she spent much of her childhood accompanying her father, an agricultural scientist, while he visited sharecroppers in far-flung locations throughout the rural South, observing the lives and structures they made[…..]

Teresa Hubbard/Alexander Birchler: Sound Speed Marker at Blaffer Art Museum

Teresa Hubbard/Alexander Birchler. Sunrise Filmset Sunset. 2012. Two Digital Archival Prints, Diptych. 43.5 x 54.5 inches. Courtesy: The Artists, Tanya Bonakdar (New York), and Lora Reynolds Gallery (Austin).

Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler’s multidimensional practice is currently on view in their expansive Sound Speed Marker at the Blaffer Art Museum. The duo’s range of collaborative skills and cinematic investments is present in three video installations—Grand Paris Texas, Movie Mountain (Méliès), and Giant—and in the related photographs and an outdoor sculpture. Using as a backdrop the arid terrain of three Texas towns, Ryan, Paris,[…..]

Halka/Haiti: The Polish Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale

C.T. Jasper, Joanna Malinowska. Halka/Haiti. 18°48’05”N 72°23’01”W. Polish Pavilion. 56th International Art Exhibition - la Biennale di Venezia, All the World’s Futures. Photo by Sara Sagui. Courtesy: la Biennale di Venezia.

On a dirt road surrounded by low buildings, the inhabitants of a remote village in Haiti gather for an unusual purpose. A cohort of Haitian musicians with string and brass instruments sit on folding chairs, tuning their instruments. At the center of this panoramic view are three performers, incongruous for their obvious European-ness, and for their 18th-century period dress. The orchestra commences, and the performers[…..]

From the Archive – Help Desk: Making a Statement

David Hockney, A Bigger Splash, 1967. Acrylic on canvas, 8 x 8 feet

Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here. All submissions become the property of Daily Serving. Today we’re revisiting an oldie-but-goodie; this article was originally published on July 9, 2012.  I’m in the process of writing an artist statement for a gallery that has recently picked up my work. What makes for[…..]

Jorge Méndez Blake: Topographic transferrals from the Biblioteca Nacional at MUAC

Jorge Méndez Blake. The Topographer. (Marking a Series of Points from the National Library to the University Museum of Contemporary Art), Still, 2015. Courtesy Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC).

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. For the next five Sundays, our Shotgun Reviews will come from the finalists for the Daily Serving/Kadist Art Foundation Writing Fellowship in Mexico City. In today’s edition, author Tania Puente reviews the work of Jorge Méndez Blake at the Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo in Mexico City.[…..]

Molly Dilworth: 2421 Miles at ALL RISE

Molly Dilworth. 2421 Miles, 2015; Courtesy of ALL RISE. Photo: Max Cleary

“When I worked for the Seattle Times fifteen years ago, our building overlooked this lot,” remarked Molly Dilworth during a recent artist talk. Her project, 2421 Miles, is a 52,000-square-foot earthwork (organized in collaboration with ALL RISE) located on a vacant city block in the heart of downtown. Returning to the site this spring was a homecoming of sorts for the Brooklyn-based artist. The ALL[…..]

Interview with Judith Bernstein

QUATTRO CUNTS 2015 Oil on Canvas 84 x 84 Inches

I can take [an] image and make it into a feminist power image… I made my signatures gigantic because I wanted to make sure everyone knew a woman did it.