Articles

Odd Jobs: Charles Gaines

Charles Gaines. Numbers and Trees V. Landscape #8: Orange Crow, 1978; acrylic sheet, acrylic paint, watercolor, photograph. 46 5⁄8 × 38 5⁄8 in. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

For the past forty years, Charles Gaines has employed system-based methodologies to his artmaking in order to critique subjective expression within art. Influenced by Tantric Buddhist diagrams in the late 1960s, his photographs, drawings, and works on paper investigate how rule-based procedures construct order and meaning. Gaines is also a highly regarded educator at the California Institute of the Arts. He received his MFA from the Rochester[…..]

Breaking Point: Accessibility and the Cummer Museum

A 2004 meeting of Women of Vision. The group of low-vision and blind women meet monthly at the Cummer Museum to make art, go on touch-tours of the museum, and write their memoirs. Photo courtesy of Hope McMath.

Today we bring you Calder Yates’s essay from our sister publication, Art Practical; originally published in Issue 8.1: Art + Citizenship. Yates retraces the history of the Cummer Museum in Jacksonville, Florida, and its journey towards accessibility and inclusivity under former museum director Hope McMath. Calder states “In Jacksonville, with all of the residual bigotry that comes with its legacy as a city in the South, the creation of[…..]

John Buck at Robischon Gallery

John Buck. The Immigration, 2016; jelutong wood, acrylic paint, leather, motors; 114 x 268 x 168 in. Courtesy of Robischon Gallery.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Kate Nicholson reviews John Buck at Robischon Gallery in Denver. John Buck’s colossal kinetic sculptures draw passersby into Robischon Gallery, including families[…..]

Sculptures and People

Gordon Newell. Valley Landing, (date unknown); installation view, Fulton Mall (Fresno, CA). Photo: Elena Harvey Collins, 2016

Today we bring you an Elena Harvey Collins essay from our sister publication, Art Practical. Harvey Collins explores the genius loci of the Fulton Mall in Fresno, California, its history and redevelopment, and the public artworks that surround it. She says “The mall had the feeling of a permanent film set made for the performance of civic life—one steeped in magical realism. ‘I woke up feelin’[…..]

From the Archives – Taravat Talepasand: Not an Arab Spring at Beta Pictoris Gallery

. Taravat Talepasand. Khomeini, 2015; egg tempura on linen; 48 x 36 in.

Spurred by recent elections in the US and abroad, there’s been a resurgence of interest by artists and critics alike in so-called “political art.” Today from our archives we bring you a review of Taravat Talepasand’s work at Beta Pictoris; author Jordan Amirkhani argues that Telepasand’s work operates much in the same way as Andy Warhol’s, wherein a cultural actor becomes a symbolic fetish to[…..]

Beverly Buchanan: Ruins and Rituals at the Brooklyn Museum

Beverly Buchanan. Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture), n.d.; black and white photograph with original paint marks, 8 ½ x 11 inches. ©Estate of Beverly Buchanan, Courtesy of Jane Bridges and the Brooklyn Museum.

A comprehensive and long overdue exhibition of Beverly Buchanan’s work kicks off A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum—a yearlong program of ten exhibitions celebrating the first decade of the museum’s Elizabeth Sackler Feminist Art Center. In a time when voices of misogyny and white supremacy are gaining renewed validation in national political discourse, exploring assumptions around feminism and what feminist art[…..]

The Art of Citizenship: Mierle Laderman Ukeles at the Queens Museum

Mierle Laderman Ukeles. Sanitation Celebrations: Grand Finale of the First NYC Art Parade, Part I: The Social Mirror, 1983; garbage collection truck, tempered glass mirror, and acrylic mirror; 28 x 8 x 10 1⁄2 ft. Created in collaboration with DSNY. Courtesy of the Artist.
Mierle Laderman Ukeles. Sanitation Celebrations: Grand Finale of the First NYC Art Parade, Part I: The Social Mirror, 1983; garbage collection truck, tempered glass mirror, and acrylic mirror; 28 x 8 x 10 1⁄2 ft. Created in collaboration with DSNY. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our sister publication Art Practical we bring you Aruna D’Souza’s reflections on Mierle Laderman Ukeles at the Queens Museum. This article was published as part of Art Practical’s issue 8.1: Art + Citizenship. D’Souza states  “[Ukeles] work, and the role of the artist that her work inscribed, makes a powerful argument for the artistic possibilities of citizenship—and the responsibilities, obligations, and collective pleasures[…..]