UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015 at the Hammer Museum

Frances Stark. Bobby Jesus’s Alma Mater b/w Reading the Book of David	and/or Paying Attention Is Free, 2013; multichannel projection with sound, inkjet 	mural, and takeaway offset posters; 7:20 min. Installation view, Carnegie International, 2013. Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Conley.

In a mid-career survey as large as UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991–2015, on view at the Hammer Museum, I’m usually tempted to rush over a couple of galleries and maybe even skip a video here or there. From the get-go, Stark’s exhibition, featuring 125 drawings, collages, paintings, and video installations, had me enthralled with My Best Thing (2011), a 100-minute-long episodic animation based on the artist’s[…..]

From the Archive – Help Desk: A Spark in the Dark

Rezi van Lankveld.

As our intrepid columnist continues to traverse through Warsaw, we bring a piece of advice for all those that are finding their way in through the muddy path we call “art.” If you’re stumbling through the dark or feeling alone in your efforts, keep your chin up! Let this be the light to guide your way. Help Desk is an arts-advice column that demystifies practices for artists, writers, curators, collectors, patrons, and the general public. Submit your questions anonymously here.

Machine Project: Selections from Mr. Akita

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Today from our friends at Machine Project in Los Angeles, we bring you a video of selections from Mr. Akita, a play by Asher Hartman starring artist and comedian Cliff Hengst. Mr. Akita was performed at the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery as part of Machine Project: The Platinum Collection on September 26 and 27, 2015.

Özlem Altin at Kiria Koula

Özlem Altin. Sleeping statue, 2013; print on litho paper; 27 ½ x 22 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Kiria Koula, San Francisco. Photo: John White.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Özlem Altin’s current solo show at Kiria Koula in San Francisco. Author Zachary Royer Scholz declares: “Özlem Altin’s exhibition at Kiria Koula is a wonderful rarity. It does not present viewers with clear answers because it is not the finished result of an exploration. It is an exploration in progress, in which viewers participate—a generous[…..]

Enrique Martínez Celaya – Empires: Land and Sea at Jack Shainman Gallery

1.	Enrique Martinez Celaya. The Bloom, for the Wilderness, 2015; oil and wax on canvas; 74-3/4 x 101-3/4 x 2-1/2 in (framed). Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

“It’s not a key,” Enrique Martínez Celaya warns of the text Empires: The Writing, which accompanies his first solo exhibition at Jack Shainman, now on view at the gallery’s two venues in Chelsea under the titles Empires: Land and Empires: Sea.[1] I meet Celaya in early September, when we walk through the shows on the eve of the artist’s departure for his home in Los Angeles. Empires[…..]

Natasha Nicholson: The Artist in Her Museum at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Natasha Nicholson, Studiolo, installation view, Nicholson studio, 2015. Courtesy of the Artist and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Photo: Mike Rebholz.

If the test for the quality of an exhibition is the richness of associations it generates in a viewer, then Natasha Nicholson: The Artist in Her Museum at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art is a goldmine. The show is installed in the museum as a series of rooms, facsimiles of the artist’s studio: the Thinking Room, Strata (the studio and gallery), the Studiolo (library[…..]

Book of Scores at Disjecta

(From left to right) Ellen Lesperance, Alison O'Daniel and Helga Fassonaki. Book of Scores, 2015; installation view, Disjecta, Portland, OR. Courtesy of Disjecta. Photo: Worksighted

Cinematic moments are often remembered because of the dramatic musical accompaniment. Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho is forever memorable in part for its menacing theme composed by Bernard Herrmann. Likewise, Star Wars is instantly recognized due to John Williams’ heroic use of trumpets. Book of Scores, on view at Disjecta, is an exhibition that is equally as pointed in its intention. Occupying many forms of sculpture, sound,[…..]