Alex Da Corte: A Season in He’ll at Art + Practice

Alex Da Corte, A Season in He'll, installation view. Courtesy of Art + Practice, Los Angeles. Photo by Joshua White.

There is a scene early on in Lamberto Bava’s 1986 low-budget Italo-horror schlock fest Demons 2: A sinister figure is seen limping down a hallway. He enters a room, picks up a knife that is covered in what looks like blood, and wipes it on his soiled apron. The camera then reveals the source of the gory substance: a jar of syrup that has been[…..]

From the Archives – Help Desk: Self-Promotion

Andy Warhol, People on the Street, ca. 1980. © Andy Warhol. Gift of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. RISD Museum, Providence, RI.

This week’s Help Desk art-advice column looks back to a question from a “feral” artist and provides some strategies for self-promoting an exhibition. Got a question for our Help Desk? Submit your queries anonymously here.  I’m an artist in [redacted city] and I just got a solo show at a little gallery. I have no idea how to promote it. I didn’t go to art school and I’m[…..]

Why Museums Should Be a Safe Space to Discuss Why #BlackLivesMatter


Today, from our friends at Smithsonian Magazine, we bring you Menachem Wecker’s piece on the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture’s panel  “History, Rebellion, and Reconciliation.” The symposium “proved even timelier than organizers could have possible imagined,” taking place less than a week after the death of Freddie Gray in police custody. In the wake of seemingly endless tragedy, the Museum of African American History and other[…..]

Lou Beach: End of Days at Jack Fischer Gallery

Lou Beach. Poltroons on Parade (Pigeon! Pigeon! Pigeon!), 2016; collage; 33 x 26 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Fischer Gallery. Photo: Lou Beach.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maria Porges reviews Lou Beach: End of Days at Jack Fischer Gallery’s Minnesota Street Project location in San Francisco. In Lou Beach: End[…..]

Boom: The Art of Resistance at Random Parts

Amara T. Smith, Ellen Sebastian Chang & collaborators. House/Full of Black Women
Multiple sites, Oakland, CA
“Now You See Me” video documentation by Ginika Oruche
Original lantern used in performance with replica veil material

Impeccably curated by artist–organizer Leslie Dreyer at Random Parts gallery, Boom: The Art of Resistance is an exhibition that does not advertise its impact, and it could be mistaken for “scrappy” if one ignored the precision of the show and the assumptions jammed into that word. Installed in the small storefront/apartment space in Oakland, a few of the show’s works are in the well-used kitchen,[…..]

Joan Jonas: From Away at DHC ART

Installation view, Joan Jonas: From Away, 2016, DHC/ART. Joan Jonas, They Come to us Without a Word (Wind), 2015. Multimedia Installation (site-specific adaptation). Originally commissioned for the U.S. Pavilion of the 56th Venice Biennale by the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Courtesy of The Kramlich Collection, San Francisco. © DHC/ART Foundation for Contemporary Art. Photo: Richard-Max Tremblay.

As psycho-historian, I try to diagnose the schizophrenia of Western civilization from its images, in an autobiographical reflex. (Joan Jonas, The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things) Joan Jonas’ retrospective exhibition From Away occupies two buildings at DHC/ART in Montreal. Arriving at the basement’s miniature cinema felt like entering a cauldron of the Jonasian universe, and moving up and down in the tightly vertical first building[…..]

Letter from the Editor

Romare Bearden. The Block II, 1972;
collage of various papers with foil, paint, ink, graphite, and surface abrasion on seventeen fiberboard and plywood panels.
© Romare Bearden Foundation

Last week, Deadline reported that the New York Times discontinued regional coverage of the arts. Significantly, in her August 6 column, NYT Public Editor Liz Spayd asked, “Why should a newsroom that just announced lofty international ambitions spend resources covering news of no interest to readers in Beijing and London?” Below the surface of this question lies the implication that cultural events happening in smaller[…..]