Artist Videos

Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway Is a Disco at ARNDT Singapore

Del Kathryn Barton. The highway is a disco, 2015; Acrylic on French linen; 240 × 180 cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Arndt Singapore.

Framed against a starlit sky, two female figures with feathered hair and large, limpid eyes sit astride blue and purple kangaroos. Their lush, naked bodies are stark white against a vibrant canvas of marks, lines, and dots. They stare out of pictorial space into an unknown distance, with their detached gazes separated from the viewer’s own perusal of them. Disengaged from us, their distance forms[…..]

From the Archives — Windswept

Gail Wight. Homage to the Wind (video still), 2012; HD video; 16:09. Courtesy of Gail Wight.

Gail Wight considers how wind shapes the space we inhabit.

From the Archives: “Hello, all-but-forgotten piece of 1970s feminist Earth Art, have you ever seen a transsexual before?”

Liz Rosenfeld, Untitled [Dyketactics Revisited], 2005. Video transfer.

This week, inundated with news of artists to watch at the Frieze Art Fair, we bring you Jaqueline Clay’s assessment of a group show at the now-closed MacArthur B Arthur Gallery in Oakland, one that included the work of Shana Moulton. Moulton’s work at Frieze this year includes video and sculpture, and her recent exhibitions include Picture Pattern Puzzle Door at the Yerba Buena Center for[…..]

Jaime Davidovich: Adventures of the Avant-Garde at the Bronx Museum

Jaime Davidovich. Blue/Red/Yellow, 1974; three video installations; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Henrique Faria, New York.

Spread about a large rear gallery at the Bronx Museum, this exhibition surveys various bodies of work by the Argentine American artist Jaime Davidovich. At the entrance of the show, alongside the explanatory wall text, a small monitor atop a pedestal plays the video that lends the exhibition its title, Adventures of the Avant-Garde. In this 1981 short loop, Davidovich takes on a role that[…..]

Ewa Stackelberg: Fotogram at Fotografiska

Ewa Stackelberg. Divan Grottan, 2011; photogram; Divan series. Courtesy of Ewa Stackelberg and Fotografiska.

In October 1997, Ewa Stackelberg’s husband died in a plane accident in Costa Rica. Among the belongings sent to her after the tragedy was her husband’s camera, which had been smashed to pieces in the crash—almost like a foreshadowing of the turn that Stackelberg’s life and practice would take in the years to come. In the search for a new artistic language to express her grief,[…..]

Glenn Ligon: Call and Response at Camden Art Centre

Glenn Ligon. Live (detail), 2014; video installation; size variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Camden Art Centre, London. Photo: Valerie Bennett

The designation Call and Response describes the antiphony effect, a device in speech in which a speaker elicits cadenced responses from the audience at systematic intervals. It’s a method that actively engages an audience, and although this universal device is as old as human speech in every corner of the world, in the American psyche it is particularly tied to black churches and the gospel[…..]

Stan VanDerBeek: Poemfield at the Box

Stan VanDerBeek: Poemfield at The Box, Los Angeles (installation view). Courtesy of the Estate of Stan VanDerBeek and The Box, LA. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

From the malevolent mainframe of 2001’s “Hal” to the proliferation of remote-controlled, drone-delivered destruction, dystopian visions of technology exist in abundance. Even contemporary artists who work with technology, like Cory Arcangel and Wade Guyton, tend to focus on its glitches and limitations. By contrast, the Box’s dazzling exhibition of computer-animated films by Stan VanDerBeek offers a hopeful perspective on the promise of technology, one that[…..]