Artist Videos

“Hello, all but forgotten piece of 1970s feminist Earth Art, have you ever seen a transsexual before?”

Liz Rosenfeld, Untitled [Dyketactics Revisited], 2005. Video transfer.

Sight, acknowledgment, and shared experience all figure prominently in Hybrid Narrative: Video Mediations of Self and the Imagined Self, currently at Mac Arthur B Arthur in Oakland, CA. Artists Liz Rosenfeld, Chris E. Vargas, Sofia Cordova and Shana Moulton make themselves “seen” though video, film transfer, installation and performance. Rosenfeld’s Untitled (Dyketactics Revisited), a 16mm film transfer to video, brings us to another time both[.....]

Judy Chicago Revives ‘Sublime Environments’ For Pacific Standard Time

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Today’s article is brought to you from our friends at the Huffington Post. Do you remember your first time you saw dry ice? Mine was in a punch bowl as part of a Halloween school dance. There was something inherently magical about the material; when I first encountered it I kept blinking, waiting for what looked like an illusion to reveal itself. Watching Judy Chicago’s[.....]

Gabríela Friðriksdóttir: Crepusculum

Comprising only a large installation at the Schirn Kunsthalle, Gabríela Friðriksdóttir’s Crepusculum – Latin for “twilight” or “dusk” – is a mixed-media, polyphonic, physical exploration of metaphysical structures that govern the human psyche, and speculates that an enigmatic and irrational system of signs, meanings and forms counterbalances the deceptively ordered exteriors of our existence. Above all, it is an experiential and tactile show that prioritises[.....]

Act. Repeat. Suspend. Sharon Lockhart’s Lunch Break at SFMOMA.

The stairway to the fourth floor of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art leads me directly toward a long, narrow, darkened space, at the end of which is the image of another, much longer, passageway. In that image, a concrete floor below and light fixtures above trace a trajectory toward infinity punctuated by pipes, wires, hoses, storage boxes, tools, and lockers. The scene is[.....]

The Girl Chewing Gum, and the Perils of Google

Googling yourself can ultimately be a very dangerous, and addictive, thing to do. And with the automation of Google Alerts, this fundamentally narcissistic activity is even less guilt-ridden – just passively sit back and every tidbit of information about you uploaded into cyberspace is sent straight to your inbox. As I recently discovered, you can often find yourself in unexpected and somewhat cringeworthy contexts –[.....]

The Part That Would Like to Burn Down Our Own House

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Recently in the San Francisco Bay Area it has been impossible to walk down a street without running into (or trying to avoid) someone protesting something. The messages range from concise to ironic, sardonic to flat-out fed up. In the undulating sea of abridged manifestos, there is the rare message so poignant that it demands the sign-bearer’s cause receives deeper consideration. Geoff Oppenheimer’s current exhibit[.....]

Jaap Pieters at Spectacle

How art can reveal the truth is a debate that will never end. Depending on who you ask, fidelity has been correlated with formal abstraction’s ability to reveal raw feelings, the eye’s capability to expose ontic faithfulness, or sometimes the artworks function in the social or political spheres. Some artists try to reveal truth, wherever they see it. Often unwilling to limit what makes truth,[.....]