Collage

From the Archive – Fan Mail: Joe Webb

Joe Webb. TV Times, 2014; collage; 9 ½” x 6 ¾” inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

Almost a year ago today we published an article featuring the work of Joe Webb. Fan Mail columnist Will Brown selected Webb’s work from hundreds of reader submissions, noting that “humor comes to the fore in all of [the artist’s] images.” Currently, Webb’s work is on view in the Prints & Originals Gallery at the Saatchi Gallery in London through April 7, 2015. This article was originally published on March[…..]

Gilbert & George: Utopian Pictures at Arndt Gallery

Gilbert & George. God Guides Us, 2014; 151cm × 191cm. Photo: Courtesy of Arndt gallery and the artists.

In the 21st-century lexicon of urban development, the term utopia has all but vanished from the descriptors of a contemporary city. It’s more comfortably consigned to the archaic vocabulary of 18th-century academia. Yet it remains a silent ideological underpinning of economic policies, an elusive goal that governments strive toward but leave unacknowledged—seen, for instance, in laws forbidding “transgressive” behavior, constant political entanglements, or even in perpetual urban[…..]

Michael Pajon: Palimpsest at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery

Michael Pajon. The Night was Clear as Her Puddled Tears. 2014. Mixed media collage on book covers. 11 x 19 inches. Image: Courtesy of the Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, 2015.

To invoke a palimpsest is to find oneself wading into an extremely fertile territory of meaning. With equal relevance to the development of mathematics, geology, architecture, and memory studies, the term has transcended its origins as a reusable writing parchment in ancient Greece to become a material metaphor for the multilayered history of a particular place, epoch, or individual subject. Despite the term’s dynamic etymological[…..]

Interview with Shanti Grumbine

Shanti Grumbine. Persephone, April 2, 2013, A1, 2015; basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel, 22 x 29 in.

Art in time of conflict is not for the faint of conviction. For its makers, it can be leveraged for communication, catharsis, or an attempt at clarity; Brooklyn-based artist Shanti Grumbine engages with all three. She cuts found text and images in reconsideration of the boundaries between absence and presence—between profane and sacred content. Her drawings, prints, and collages make hay of what remains from[…..]

Justin Mortimer: Sevastopol at Future Perfect

Justin Mortimer. Jabalya, 2014; oil on canvas; 50 x 70 cm (detail). Photo: courtesy of the Artist and Future Perfect Asia, Singapore.

Annexed by Russia in 1782 during the reign of Catherine the Great, Sevastopol became an important naval base to the Russian Black Sea Fleet only to fall decades later to allied British, French, and Turkish troops during the Crimean War (1853–56) after a long, protracted siege that lasted eleven months. During the existence of the Soviet Union, the famous fortress city was transferred to the Ukrainian[…..]

Jean Conner: Collages at Gallery Paule Anglim

Jean Conner. Untitled (Mother Daughter), 1980; paper collage; 13½ x 9¾ in. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Paule Anglim.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Jean Conner’s collages at Gallery Paule Anglim in San Francisco. Catch this show if you can! Author Genevieve Quick calls the artist’s work “strongly provocative” and notes, “[Conner’s] confidence and skill in selection, placement, and juxtaposition… create surprising amounts of visual play, leading to strong formal compositions and intriguing ideas.” This article[…..]

Saying Yes to Everything at Honor Fraser

Ray Yoshida. Comic Book Specimen #1 — Right Profile, c. 1965; Collage on paper, 22 x 28 in. Courtesy of the estate of Ray Yoshida. Photo Tom Van Eynde. Collection of KAWS, New York.

Saying Yes to Everything, an exhibition featuring nineteen artists working in collage, recently opened at Honor Fraser Gallery in Los Angeles. On display are a range of works made between 1960 and the present day by both established and emerging artists. The title is a commentary on the essential inclusivity of collage. But understanding the medium’s place in art history can help the viewer appreciate[…..]