Collage

Jorge Macchi: Perspectiva at Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires

Jorge Macchi. Monoblock, 2013; paper. Courtesy of MALBA.

Maps, clocks, dictionaries, music sheets, signals, and words are all different resources we have to decode our reality. By living under a unified structure, we can rest assured that our messages will be understood. A sense of normality is reinforced. But what lies underneath these layers of language? Can we realize how reality is built around us? Do we know how to dismantle the rules[…..]

Fan Mail: Jason Kearney

Jason Kearney. Untoward, 2015; digital collage; 9.8 x 11.8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Jason Kearney’s collage Untoward (2015) juxtaposes one figure against another, creating an ambiguous relationship. A man sitting at the wheel of a car gazes through the windshield at a man on a fainting couch. The man at the wheel has a perplexed look on his face (viewers can see him reflected in the rear-view mirror)—or maybe he is simply squinting from the sunlight. Untoward is[…..]

Cut-Up at Franklin Street Works

Phyllis Baldino. The Unknown Series, 1994–96 (detail); mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist.

“Everything in the world began with a yes. One molecule said yes to another molecule and life was born,” professes Clarice Lispector in the first lines of her 1977 novel, The Hour of the Star. Like the universe, art also begins with a yes. Some yeses are small: get out of bed today, put this image next to that one. Other yeses are bigger: continue[…..]

Galeria Piwna 20/26 Emilia and Andrzej Dłużniewski 1980–1993 at Galeria Monopol

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Galeria Piwna 20/26 Emilia and Andrzej Dłużniewski 1980–1993 at Monopol provides a rare glimpse into the history of an influential apartment gallery that operated in Warsaw for thirteen years. From the imposition of Martial Law through the collapse of the Berlin Wall and beyond, the Dłużniewskis exhibited artworks by Polish and international post-conceptual artists. The retrospective exhibition at Monopol resonates with an uneasy timeliness: Given the prevailing political[…..]

Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway Is a Disco at ARNDT Singapore

Del Kathryn Barton. The highway is a disco, 2015; Acrylic on French linen; 240 × 180 cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Arndt Singapore.

Framed against a starlit sky, two female figures with feathered hair and large, limpid eyes sit astride blue and purple kangaroos. Their lush, naked bodies are stark white against a vibrant canvas of marks, lines, and dots. They stare out of pictorial space into an unknown distance, with their detached gazes separated from the viewer’s own perusal of them. Disengaged from us, their distance forms[…..]

Fan Mail: Ashley Pastore

Ashley Pastore. Real Women Make Their Mark; pen, tea, cut magazine; 40 x 32 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Ashley Pastore has a thing for old science and life magazines. Poring over dated issues of National Geographic, Pastore has come to appreciate the visual aesthetic and color palette of print from the ’50s to ’80s, which she describes as being rich, deep, and full-bodied. After scouring Craigslist and rummaging through random thrift stores, the artist now has a sizable collection of vintage magazines that[…..]

UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015 at the Hammer Museum

Frances Stark. Bobby Jesus’s Alma Mater b/w Reading the Book of David	and/or Paying Attention Is Free, 2013; multichannel projection with sound, inkjet 	mural, and takeaway offset posters; 7:20 min. Installation view, Carnegie International, 2013. Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Conley.

In a mid-career survey as large as UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991–2015, on view at the Hammer Museum, I’m usually tempted to rush over a couple of galleries and maybe even skip a video here or there. From the get-go, Stark’s exhibition, featuring 125 drawings, collages, paintings, and video installations, had me enthralled with My Best Thing (2011), a 100-minute-long episodic animation based on the artist’s[…..]