Collage

Borna Sammak: All Dogs Are Pets at JTT

Borna Sammak. All Dogs Are Pets, 2014; installation view, JTT, New York. Courtesy of the artist and JTT.

All Dogs Are Pets, Borna Sammak’s current solo exhibition at JTT, presents sculpture, painting, and video full of glowing references to 1990s American suburbia. Trafficking in the humorous young boys’ fare of canceled Nickelodeon cartoons, Sammak’s pieces are composed of sometimes repurposed, sometimes refabricated objects you might find at a Wal-Mart or strip-mall store. His work draws from the cultural garbage can, creating an aesthetic[.....]

Yee I-Lann: Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art

Yee I-Lann. Picturing Power: Wherein one nods with political sympathy and says I understand you better than you understand yourself, I’m just here to help you help yourself, 2013; Giclée print on Hahnemüle Photo Rag Ultra Smooth Fine Art, 310 gsm 100% cotton rag paper, 25 x 25 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Tyler Rollins Fine Art.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Bansie Vasvani reviews Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art in New York City Yee I-Lann’s solo exhibition Picturing Power at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, New York, is[.....]

Fan Mail: Joe Webb

At The Gallery, 2013; collage; 10 ¾” x 9 ¼” inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

In Joe Webb’s Stirring Up A Storm (2014), the nearly full moon peers resolutely down like a removed voyeur, while a continent-sized Sunbeam Mixmaster Junior (an electric mixer from the 1950s) stirs Earth’s atmosphere with its twin silver beaters to create massive, hurricane-like weather patterns. From the description alone, issues of global warming and energy crises come to mind; however, the well-crafted humor, imaginative aesthetic,[.....]

30 Americans at the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans

In a nod to Linda Nochlin’s famous query, Michele Wallace asked, “Why are there no great black artists?”[1] 30 Americans is the response to this question, a beautiful, rambunctious show that gathers the work of 31 African American artists. Unfortunately, 30 Americans, similar to Thelma Golden’s Freestyle in 2001, is not about a specific curatorial theory or thought, but rather a placing of African American[.....]

Ramiro Gomez: Domestic Scenes at Charlie James Gallery

Ramiro Gomez. Woman Cleaning Shower
in Beverly Hills
(after David Hockney’s
Man Taking Shower in
Beverly Hills, 1964), 2013. 
Acrylic on canvas. 36 x
36 inches. Courtesy the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Osceola Refetoff.

Ramiro Gomez’s show at Charlie James Gallery has been gaining a lot of attention for his topical use of visual politics to introduce labor and immigration issues into the art discourse. Most notably, Gomez appropriates the image of David Hockney’s iconic painting A Bigger Splash (1967) and a group of smaller Hockneys from the same period in his own paintings. The jubilant splash of Hockney’s[.....]

Julia Rometti & Victor Costales: Savage Palms, Worn Stones, Moonshine Vision at Midway Contemporary Art

Julia Rometti & Victor Costales, Ediciones del Exotismo Ordinario Internacional Neotropical (detail), ongoing from 2011, digital prints on newsprint paper (lapel revolución). Courtesy Midway Contemporary Art. Photo: Caylon Hackwith.

At Midway Contemporary Art in Minneapolis, dueling 35mm slide projectors whir and click in a darkened back room. Perched on top of two of the room’s many bookcases (this backroom also houses Midway’s impressive library), these projectors cast their images onto a shared center screen. Each slide contains a simple form on a white background: a single geological mass anchored by a heavy shadow. Overlapped[.....]

John Sparagana: Crowds & Powder at Corbett vs. Dempsey

John Sparagana. Crowds & Power: The Revolutionaries, 2013; archival inkjet prints with oil stick, sliced and mixed, on paper; 58 x 92 in. Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago. Photo: Tom Van Eynde.

John Sparagana fatigues images by manipulating them. First he scans pictures and runs off inkjet prints, then he crumples the pictures in his pocket and kneads the glossy paper for days or weeks until the sheet’s fibrous structure is loosened. The result is a soft fabric more than double in size, with its original image lightened and diminished on the new surface, appearing like a[.....]