Collage

Derrick Adams: Network at CAAM

Derrick Adams. Fabrication Station #8, 2016; mixed fabric collage, aluminum hanging rods; 6 x 9 ft. Courtesy of the California African American Museum. Photo: Andy Romer.

Recently many have observed that current American film and television scenarios feel familiar, with offerings that appear diverse and multicultural, as they would have seemed in earlier decades. This is not to say that the struggles of marginalized communities have been overcome; just because a person is visible does not mean that person is liberated. However, media representations can illustrate experiences outside of dominant cultural[…..]

Issues of Power: Resilience and Healing

Juan Roberto Diago. Aché Pa’ Los Míos [Good Vibes for My People], 1999, mixed media on burlap. Courtesy of The Cooper Gallery.

Today from our friends at Big Red & Shiny, we bring you a conversation between artist Chanel Thervil and artist and curator Silví Naçí. They discuss artist Juan Roberto Diago’s first retrospective, curated by Alejandro de la Fuente at the Cooper Gallery. Naci parallels the exploration of diasporic Africans in colonized Cuba in Diago’s work with the current political state of the U.S., saying, “…during a crucial moment in U.S.[…..]

Interview with Njideka Akunyili Crosby

I Refuse to Be Invisible, 2011, acrylic, charcoal, and xerox transfer on paper, 24 × 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Today from our friends at BOMB Magazine, we bring you author Erica Ando’s interview with Nigerian artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby. Crosby says of her paintings, “I always make sure the woman is in a position of power—where her agency is not questioned and where she is an active participant.” This article was originally published in BOMB 137: Fall 2016. The figures who people Njideka Akunyili Crosby’s[…..]

An Atlas of Mirrors: Singapore Biennale 2016

Titarubi. History Repeats Itself, 2016; Gold-plated nutmeg, copper-plated wood, nickel-plated wood, burnt wood, sampan, wood, aluminium, copper, soil, light and nutmeg perfume; Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of Singapore Art Museum.

There is no shortage of mirrors and maps in the fifth iteration of the Singapore Biennale. Glass mirrors in Harumi Yukutake’s Paracosmos (2016) curve around the main circular stairwell of the Singapore Art Museum, dazzling the eye as light hits their multiple reflective surfaces. Dozens of mirrors appear in their reflections; dozens more yet, to the power of infinity, show up in the reflections of their reflections. In[…..]

Bruce Conner: It’s All True

Bruce Conner. UNTITLED, from MANDALA SERIES, 1965; felt-tip pen on paper; 10 x 10 in. Courtesy San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Among the works at the threshold of Bruce Conner: It’s All True, a massive retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), PRINTS (1974) is atypical even for the protean artist.[1] Consisting of a steel lockbox containing photographs, documents, and fingerprints, PRINTS records a protracted dispute between Conner and San Jose State University, which had invited him to teach in its art department.[…..]

From the Archives — Memoria (Memory): Bibiana Suárez at Hyde Park Art Center

(L t R): Bibiana Suárez. Aves raras (mexicanos) no. 1 / Strange Birds (Mexicans) no. 1, 2005-2011; archival inkjet print on aluminum panel (map courtesy of the University of Chicago’s Special Collections); 24 x 24 in.  Bibiana Suárez. Aves raras (mexicanos) no. 2 / Strange Birds (Mexicans) no. 2, 2005-2011; archival inkjet print (map courtesy of the University of Chicago’s Special Collections); 24 x 24 in.

Looking back to another election year, in 2012 author Randall Miller noted, “The language surrounding immigration, espoused by the [GOP] candidates as well as other jingoist hardliners, has become so vitriolic and so reduced that hyperbole strategically crowds out any sober dialogue that addresses the complexity of the issue.” In the face of those who advocate overtly prejudiced perspectives, today from our archives we bring you[…..]

Fan Mail: Ewa Doroszenko

Ewa Doroszenko. Image from the series The Promise of Sublime Words, 2016; digital print; size variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

It can be difficult to tell which parts of Ewa Doroszenko’s works are digital and which are physical, though perhaps this lack of distinction is what makes her series The Promise of Sublime Words most potent. By combining digital and analog processes so seamlessly, Doroszenko’s practice blurs their boundaries to the point of meaninglessness. The result is a body of work that demands a reevaluation[…..]