Collage

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Mary and Leigh Block Museum

Wangechi Mutu. Suspended Playtime, 2008/2013; Packing blankets, twine, garbage bags, and gold string; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects.

This year has been unusually promising for the visibility of work by black female artists, even while that prominence has further highlighted racially problematic attitudes within the art world. The last ten months have marked the first in which an African American woman—Carrie Mae Weems—was given a retrospective at the Guggenheim, though her triumphant entry into that pantheon led to rebukes that the museum cut the original[.....]

Matt Borruso: Wax House of Wax at Steven Wolf Fine Arts

Matt Borruso. Forming, 2012–14; installation view, Wax House of Wax, 2014; plastic, Plexiglas, glass, mirrors, cut paper, ceramic, unfired clay, silicone, wax, talc, lenticular photographs, holograms, wood, tape, rubber bands, linen, concrete, steel, elastic, books, magazines, airbrush paint, inkjet prints, transparencies, posters, wallpaper; 120 x 42 x 61 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Steven Wolf Fine Arts, San Francisco.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Matt Borruso’s recent solo show Wax House of Wax, which closes today at Steven Wolf Fine Arts in San Francisco. Author Danica Willard Sachs notes, “Like a Surrealist, Borruso manipulates the banal, challenging viewers to see the horror underlying the everyday.” This review was originally published on October 23, 2014. In Wax House[.....]

Summer Reading: The Influentially Lewd Allure of Robert Heinecken

Robert Heinecken. Recto/Verso #2, 1988; 
Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Mr. and Mrs. Clark Winter Fund.

As the editors of Art Practical and Daily Serving get ready to take their end-of-summer vacations, we find ourselves swapping reading lists—the articles we’ll dive into once have some uninterrupted time to catch up on what our colleagues have been writing. We’ve gotten so excited about what’s on our lists that we want to share them with our readers. Between now and Labor Day, Daily Serving will feature the efforts[.....]

From the Archives – Interview with Mario Zoots

Today from our archives we bring you an interview with artist Mario Zoots, conducted by Daily Serving‘s founder, Seth Curcio. This article was originally published on February 15, 2010. The mysterious and psychologically challenging images created by Denver-based artist Mario Zoots are produced by applying a visual barrier between the viewer and the appropriated image. Each work carefully alters an existing picture and challenges our perception[.....]

Fan Mail: Chris Rusak

Chris Rusak. Rhetoric, 2013; acrylic on fiberglass; 9 x 10 x 7/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Painting and collage are processes composed in layers—often opaque in nature, each altering or shrouding its antecedent. Traditional two-dimensional compositions begin with a canvas, then some form of underpaint, followed by a series of strata—at times scraped away and at others built up—that eventually form a composition that becomes an entirety greater than the sum of its parts. Chris Rusak’s newest works, a series called[.....]

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties at Brooklyn Museum

Sam Gilliam. Red April, 1970; acrylic on canvas, 110 x 160 in. Courtesy of the Iowa Museum of Art, Gift of the Longview Foundation.

As someone born two decades after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, I received visual access to the civil-rights era predominantly through photographic documentation. Black-and-white photos in history books, documentary films, and microfilm of front-page newspaper stories shaped my understanding of the period, suggesting a more or less linear sequence of events. Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties, now at the Brooklyn Museum,[.....]

Borna Sammak: All Dogs Are Pets at JTT

Borna Sammak. All Dogs Are Pets, 2014; installation view, JTT, New York. Courtesy of the artist and JTT.

All Dogs Are Pets, Borna Sammak’s current solo exhibition at JTT, presents sculpture, painting, and video full of glowing references to 1990s American suburbia. Trafficking in the humorous young boys’ fare of canceled Nickelodeon cartoons, Sammak’s pieces are composed of sometimes repurposed, sometimes refabricated objects you might find at a Wal-Mart or strip-mall store. His work draws from the cultural garbage can, creating an aesthetic[.....]