Collage

The Dark Side of Mickey Mouse: Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum

Llyn Foulkes. Pop, 1985-90; mixed media with soundtrack; 84 x 123 x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist's website.

Llyn Foulkes ranks among that rare cadre of artists for whom fame is an optional extra. Over the course of his fifty-year career, the Los Angeles–based multimedia artist and musician has experienced periods of success—for his monumental Pop-influenced paintings of rocks and, decades later, for his zany, large-scale narrative tableaux. But much of his work has been met with silence from critics and buyers, allowing[.....]

Collages Meditate on the Female Psyche

Flore Kunst. Pise-up, n.d.; paper collage.

As part of our ongoing partnership with Beautiful/Decay, today we bring you the work of artist Flore Kunst. Kunst lives in and works in Lyon, France, and states that her collages “seem to emerge by chance.” The article was written by Stacy Dacheux and originally published on August 9, 2013. Mixing an admiration for John Baldessari with her own childhood memories of cutting/altering magazines with her mother, Flore Kunst creates captivating[.....]

The Raw and the Resplendent: Kathryn Parker Almanas at Yellow Peril Gallery

Visceral, bracing, potent, Kathryn Parker Almanas’s Pre-Existing Condition, currently on view at Yellow Peril Gallery, is a collision of sensory extremes and formal nuances. In large-scale color photographs and small-scale collage works, the artist pictures and probes the physical body, both its corporeal effusions and existential implications. The result is an intensely vital, deeply disorienting study of being, sensation, and the intersection of inner and outer[.....]

Postscript: An Ambitious Take on Conceptual Art and Writing at the Power Plant

Kenneth Goldsmith, Soliloquy, 1996.

Upon entering Toronto’s Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery to see Postscript: Writing After Conceptual Art, the viewer is immediately confronted by a raucous wash of sonorous elements. Over fifty artists and conceptual writers occupy the gallery space; canonical works from Andy Warhol, Sol LeWitt, Marcel Broodthaers, Carl Andre, and Dan Graham are nestled among pieces by contemporary practitioners, contributing to the sense of saturation. Originally curated[.....]

Supertheory of Supereverything: Interview with Eric William Carroll

GUT FEELING Installation Photos-5 RE-EDIT

Like many in the scientific community, Eric William Carroll is searching for an ultimate theory of everything, but he’s doing so in a slightly different way. For G.U.T. Feeling, the current exhibition at Highlight Gallery, Carroll utilized aspects of the scientific method in combination with personal associations to create a series of collages, photographs, and sculptures that expose the unexpected, overlooked, and sometimes comically dubious connections in[.....]

Formal Collapse: No Name at On Stellar Rays

(From left to right) Michael Mahalchick. Flag, 2013. Newspaper, bacon fat, pigment, brushes, tacks, Savarin coffee can; 43 x 78 x 10 in. Susan Collins. Long Fallen Wide, 2013. Poplar, tulipwood, maple, beech, white holly, crushed malachite, beeswax, oxidized silver, white gold, bronze, garnet, amber; 71 x 5 x 5 in. Shamus Clisset, SWASS (Long Charm), 2012. C-print; 80 x 56 1/2 in. Nathaniel Robinson. Heap, 2013. Pigmented polyurethane resin, acrylic paint; dimensions variable. Bayard. President Balances National Budgie, 2008. Mohair; dimensions variable. Sterling Allen. Untitled, 2013. Ribbons, pushpins; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artists and On Stellar Rays.

No Name, the group show currently on view at Lower East Side gallery On Stellar Rays, is a theory-based project that develops a collaborative scene of  “gestures, memories and detritus.” The show presents a collection of objects that are incoherent, elusive, and laden with a mysterious personal logic. The work demonstrates a strong theoretical basis, drawing primarily from Judith/Jack Halberstam’s advocation of failure as a[.....]

Experimental Photomontage at Robert Koch Gallery

Robert Heinecken. From the portfolio Recto/Verso, 1989; Cibachrome (dye destruction) photogram; 11 x 14 in. Image courtesy of Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco.

As part of our ongoing partnership with Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Robert Heinecken and Edmund Teske’s work in experimental photomontage at Robert Koch Gallery. Author Genevieve Quick analyzes the artists’ use of appropriation and their take on gender and mass media. She notes, “…there’s always more to the message than what’s on display.” This article was originally published in May 2012. Robert[.....]