Collage

Supertheory of Supereverything: Interview with Eric William Carroll

GUT FEELING Installation Photos-5 RE-EDIT

Like many in the scientific community, Eric William Carroll is searching for an ultimate theory of everything, but he’s doing so in a slightly different way. For G.U.T. Feeling, the current exhibition at Highlight Gallery, Carroll utilized aspects of the scientific method in combination with personal associations to create a series of collages, photographs, and sculptures that expose the unexpected, overlooked, and sometimes comically dubious connections in[…..]

Formal Collapse: No Name at On Stellar Rays

(From left to right) Michael Mahalchick. Flag, 2013. Newspaper, bacon fat, pigment, brushes, tacks, Savarin coffee can; 43 x 78 x 10 in. Susan Collins. Long Fallen Wide, 2013. Poplar, tulipwood, maple, beech, white holly, crushed malachite, beeswax, oxidized silver, white gold, bronze, garnet, amber; 71 x 5 x 5 in. Shamus Clisset, SWASS (Long Charm), 2012. C-print; 80 x 56 1/2 in. Nathaniel Robinson. Heap, 2013. Pigmented polyurethane resin, acrylic paint; dimensions variable. Bayard. President Balances National Budgie, 2008. Mohair; dimensions variable. Sterling Allen. Untitled, 2013. Ribbons, pushpins; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artists and On Stellar Rays.

No Name, the group show currently on view at Lower East Side gallery On Stellar Rays, is a theory-based project that develops a collaborative scene of  “gestures, memories and detritus.” The show presents a collection of objects that are incoherent, elusive, and laden with a mysterious personal logic. The work demonstrates a strong theoretical basis, drawing primarily from Judith/Jack Halberstam’s advocation of failure as a[…..]

Experimental Photomontage at Robert Koch Gallery

Robert Heinecken. From the portfolio Recto/Verso, 1989; Cibachrome (dye destruction) photogram; 11 x 14 in. Image courtesy of Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco.

As part of our ongoing partnership with Art Practical, today we bring you a review of Robert Heinecken and Edmund Teske’s work in experimental photomontage at Robert Koch Gallery. Author Genevieve Quick analyzes the artists’ use of appropriation and their take on gender and mass media. She notes, “…there’s always more to the message than what’s on display.” This article was originally published in May 2012. Robert[…..]

The Transcendental Trash of Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt

Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt. The Fountain of Youth (Spritzer Thaw), 1969; Aluminum foil, plastic wrap, pipe cleaner, holographic tape, glitter, staples, mirror, colored marker; 13 x 10 x 9 in. Courtesy of the artist and Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York.

Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt makes kitsch from the kitchen, using everyday materials such as cellophane, glitter, foil, and Easter-display grass to construct minutely detailed and coded ephemera that sanctify camp, trash, and a kind of queer sentimentality particular to the artist’s experience of the 1970s Hell’s Kitchen scene in New York. Ecce Homo, Pavel Zoubok Gallery’s current three-part exhibition, orbits around this artist’s counter-historical queer aesthetic. On the heels of his extensive[…..]

ICP Triennial: A Different Kind of Order

A Different Kind of Order, the International Center of Photography’s Triennial, includes artworks by twenty-eight international artists whose photographs, films, sculptures, video, and mixed-media works focus on the intersection of modern image making and our technologically advanced contemporary culture. The artists bring light to the nuances of our “new” world’s challenges, whether they are newfangled or all too familiar. Moving between the application and denial of[…..]

Chun Kwang Young: Assemblage

Chun Kwang Young. Aggregation 07 DE146, 2007 (detail); mixed media with Korean mulberry paper; 250 x 205 cm. Image courtesy of Michael Culme-Seymour and Art Plural gallery.

Chun Kwang Young’s Assemblage at Art Plural Gallery is a series of three-dimensional sculptural works wrapped with Korean mulberry paper and assembled within the two-dimensional frame of a canvas. Taking the ubiquitous use of the mulberry paper in Korea—also known as hanji—as a material point of reference, the Assemblage series explores a desolate landscape of depressions, protrusions and coloured spots, all of which seem to reference abstract painting’s visual language of prioritising[…..]

Enrique Chagoya: Freedom of Expression

Enrique Chagoya. The Pastoral or Arcadian State, Illegal Alien’s Guide to Greater America, 2006; color lithograph. Courtesy of the artist and Shark's Ink. Photo: Kala Art Institute.

Code-switching is the linguist’s term for substituting one language for another in the course of a single conversation. “Oye, Teacher Bean,” a student once told me, “I couldn’t do mi tarea because mi tia was late and I had to watch mi sobrino hasta medianoche.” Notice that even though the sentence ping-pongs between Spanish and English, it’s still grammatically correct. To code switch, you need[…..]