Impossible Objects at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow

Impossible Objects, 2014; installation view, Impossible Objects, 2015. Courtesy of Instytut Architektury, Krakow. Photo: Jakub Woynarowski

Cultural reproduction is at the center of Impossible Objects, an exhibition that returns to Poland after much lauded recognition at the Venice Biennale. On central display is a 1:1 replica of the baldachin designed by Adolf Szyszko-Bohusz at the beginning of the 20th century to honor the revolutionary Polish leader Marshal Józef Piłsudski. The reproduction is accompanied by artist and artistic director Jakub Woynarowski’s large-scale[…..]

UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015 at the Hammer Museum

Frances Stark. Bobby Jesus’s Alma Mater b/w Reading the Book of David	and/or Paying Attention Is Free, 2013; multichannel projection with sound, inkjet 	mural, and takeaway offset posters; 7:20 min. Installation view, Carnegie International, 2013. Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Conley.

In a mid-career survey as large as UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991–2015, on view at the Hammer Museum, I’m usually tempted to rush over a couple of galleries and maybe even skip a video here or there. From the get-go, Stark’s exhibition, featuring 125 drawings, collages, paintings, and video installations, had me enthralled with My Best Thing (2011), a 100-minute-long episodic animation based on the artist’s[…..]

Book of Scores at Disjecta

(From left to right) Ellen Lesperance, Alison O'Daniel and Helga Fassonaki. Book of Scores, 2015; installation view, Disjecta, Portland, OR. Courtesy of Disjecta. Photo: Worksighted

Cinematic moments are often remembered because of the dramatic musical accompaniment. Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho is forever memorable in part for its menacing theme composed by Bernard Herrmann. Likewise, Star Wars is instantly recognized due to John Williams’ heroic use of trumpets. Book of Scores, on view at Disjecta, is an exhibition that is equally as pointed in its intention. Occupying many forms of sculpture, sound,[…..]

Elad Lassry at David Kordansky Gallery

Elad Lassry. Untitled (Carrier, Carrots), 2015; Claro walnut, paint, varnish; 48 x 20 x 16 in. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Elad Lassry’s latest exhibition at David Kordansky commingles two groups of seemingly disparate works: highly wrought wooden sculptures, carved from single slabs of dark walnut, and dated commercial photographs, which have been intervened upon with materials such as acrylic paint, colored wires, and beads. The show attempts to bridge the gap between the two bodies of works by engaging the issue of pictorial representation as[…..]

From the Archives: “Hello, all-but-forgotten piece of 1970s feminist Earth Art, have you ever seen a transsexual before?”

Liz Rosenfeld, Untitled [Dyketactics Revisited], 2005. Video transfer.

This week, inundated with news of artists to watch at the Frieze Art Fair, we bring you Jaqueline Clay’s assessment of a group show at the now-closed MacArthur B Arthur Gallery in Oakland, one that included the work of Shana Moulton. Moulton’s work at Frieze this year includes video and sculpture, and her recent exhibitions include Picture Pattern Puzzle Door at the Yerba Buena Center for[…..]

Ellen Lesperance: We Were Singing at Adams and Ollman

Ellen Lesperance. We Were Singing, 2015; installation view, Adams and Ollman, Portland. Courtesy of the Artist and Adams and Ollman. Photo: Mario Gallucci.

Not many things are more difficult than articulating love. Displaying a lack of temperance can appear obsessive, while showing any sign of hesitance can be mistaken for a number of unintended things. Every so often, an individual demonstrates the ability to tow the line so eloquently and sincerely that the outcome is a lesson in expert labor. Ellen Lesperance’s exhibition We Were Singing at Adams[…..]

Martin Creed: Work No. 360 at the Henry Art Gallery

Martin Creed. Work No. 360: Half the air in a given space, 2015. Installation view. Courtesy of the Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. Photo: RJ Sánchez, Solstream Studios.

Let’s just state the obvious: Martin Creed’s Work No. 360: Half the Air in a Given Space, on view at Henry Art Gallery, is insanely fun to experience. Pushing your way through a space filled (true to the installation’s title, only halfway) with over 37,000 pearly gray balloons is like being in a mosh pit, surrounded by marshmallows. It’s a ridiculous image, to be sure,[…..]