Conceptual

Michael Riedel: Laws of Form at David Zwirner, London

Michael Riedel. Laws of Form, 2014; installation view, David Zwirner, London. Courtesy the Artists and David Zwirner, New York/London.

“There’s no content being produced, because I’m in the first generation that grew up digital…. We are just transferring all the time: tape, CDs, and now the clouds.”[1] Something radical has been happening for a while in art that has been evading easy classification. The digital fold has facilitated a giant mash-up of layers upon layers of information composed from fragments of fragments. Sound bites, video[…..]

Will Rogan: MATRIX 253 at Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

Will Rogan. Erase, 2014; still from video, silent; 8:10. Courtesy of the Artist, Altman 
Siegel, San Francisco; and Laurel Gitlen, New York.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Maria Porges reviews Will Rogan’s exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive. Viewing Will Rogan’s MATRIX show at the Berkeley Art Museum leaves one with[…..]

Eleanor Antin: Passengers at Diane Rosenstein Fine Art

Eleanor Antin, Classical Frieze; 2008; Video; 21.33 minutes. Courtesy of the Artist and Diane Rosenstein Fine Art. Photo: Lenae Day.

Passengers where are you going? from here to there? do you ever get there? i don’t know why not? i’m only a passenger—just like you (from an Egyptian tomb) As you round the corner of the entryway at Diane Rosenstein where this phrase is visible, the first works on view in Eleanor Antin’s Passengers are two massive photographs from her 2004 series Roman Allegories. Going[…..]

Michael Craig-Martin: Objects of our Time at Alan Cristea Gallery

(from left to right) Michael Craig-Martin. Objects of our Time: Takeaway coffee, 2014; Objects of our Time: Memory stick, 2014; both works, series of 12 screenprints, edition of 50; 50.0 x 50.0 cm. Courtesy the Artist and Alan Cristea Gallery. NPC.

Is a glass of water just a glass of water? Consider it for a fraction of a second and suddenly the glass of water carries a lot of Kosuthian baggage—the mind attaches a label to it, compares it to an ideal, then judges its function, and its value changes. Deconstruct the contextual outcome of that mental layering, and the glass of water not only offers[…..]

Paradise Lost at the Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore

Trinh T. Minh-ha. Surname Viet Given Name Nam, 1989 (film still); 16mm; 108 min. Courtesy of Moongift Films.

“Southern Asia, in general, is the seat of awful images and associations. As the cradle of the human race, it would alone have a dim and reverential feeling connected with it… [the] mere antiquity of Asiatic things, of their institutions, histories, modes of faith, &c., is so impressive, that to me the vast age of the race and name overpowers the sense of youth in[…..]

Feeling Is Mutual at Chicago Artists Coalition

Latham Zearfoss, Court of Apology #1 (COPA #1), 2014. Plexiglas, wood, subwoofer, audio. Courtesy of Chicago Artists Coalition.

Steven L. Bridges’ catalog essay for Feeling Is Mutual at Chicago Artists Coalition invokes a quote by Marcel Duchamp as a mission statement for this exhibition of performance and relational art works. Duchamp’s quote reads, “The creative act is not performed by the artist alone; the spectator brings the work in contact with the external world by deciphering and interpreting its inner qualifications and thus adds his contribution to the[…..]

Martin Creed: What’s the Point of It? at the Hayward Gallery

In a world full of arbitrary choices, Martin Creed is an artist who uses systems to make decisions and create order. Unlike most of the YBAs, who are mainly traditionalists using unconventional materials, Creed is a true conceptualist, and his work embodies the 2.0 of contemporary British art. In the lineage of Sol LeWitt—but also radically departing from his precedent—Creed examines ideas and material, identifying[…..]