Craft

Amy Reidel: Radar Home, 11.8.13 at the Sheldon Art Galleries

Amy Reidel. Tumor Storm, 2016; loose glitter and colored sand on printed vinyl; dimensions vary. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: David Johnson Photography

Amy Reidel’s solo exhibition, Radar Home, 11.8.13, takes its name from the date her mother received a doctor’s call. A week later, she was diagnosed with multiple myeloma—an incurable though treatable blood cancer. Though her mother has since recovered and is now cancer-free, this decisive moment in Reidel’s personal life unifies the wide-ranging works of painting, digital prints, video, sculpture, and installation on view at[…..]

Follicular: The Hair Stories of Sonya Clark at the Taubman Museum of Art

Sonya Clark. The Hair Craft Project: Hairstyles on Canvas, 2013; silk threads, beads, shells, and yarn on canvas; 29 x 29 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and the Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, VA.

Follicular: The Hair Stories of Sonya Clark at the Taubman Museum of Art highlights the historically rich and embodied power of Black hair, demonstrating that hair is a medium as well as a message.[1] For Clark, whose work holds a significant place in the burgeoning discourse of American contemporary craft, Black hair is an aesthetic language on par with the legacies of quilting and textile[…..]

John Buck at Robischon Gallery

John Buck. The Immigration, 2016; jelutong wood, acrylic paint, leather, motors; 114 x 268 x 168 in. Courtesy of Robischon Gallery.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Kate Nicholson reviews John Buck at Robischon Gallery in Denver. John Buck’s colossal kinetic sculptures draw passersby into Robischon Gallery, including families[…..]

Gerardo Tan: Hablon Redux and Other Transcriptions at Random Parts

Gerardo Tan. Turntable Paintings, 2016; vinyl, acrylic; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Random Parts. Photo: Maria Porges.

What does it mean to transcribe a work from one medium to another? Is the result a kind of translation, a form of documentation, a new piece of art, or all three? In a fascinating range of media—painting, video, found objects, weaving, and sound—Manila-based artist Gerardo Tan investigates these questions through three different projects presented in his solo exhibition Hablon Redux and Other Transcriptions at[…..]

Africa Forecast: Fashioning Contemporary Life at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Fabiola Jean-Louis. Amina, 2016; archival pigment print; 29 x 28.5 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Alan Avery Art Company (Atlanta, GA).

Spelman College Museum of Fine Art’s current exhibition, Africa Forecast: Fashioning Contemporary Life, presents a small but dynamic assemblage of twenty designers and artists who blur the line between fine art and fashion from across the globe. Co-curated by Spelman Museum’s own Dr. Andrea Barnwell Brownlee and Dr. Erika Dalya Massaquoi to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the institution, this exhibition embodies the curatorial commitments[…..]

Fan Mail: Suchitra Mattai

Suchitra Mattai. Generally, I don’t think that way II, 2016; mixed media installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Wes Magyar.

Suchitra Mattai’s work turns about conceptual and material inversions. It thrives on site-specificity while rejecting its basic premise—that specificity necessarily connotes place-ness. Having been raised on two separate continents and with cultural heritages tracing back to a third, Mattai is familiar with incongruities between the illusory promise of place and her lived experiences. Her practice is disjointed and dreamlike, yet throughout her uneasy landscapes runs[…..]

Invisible Presence: Bling Memories at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center

Ebony G. Patterson. Invisible Presence: Bling Memories, 2014; installation view, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Courtesy of the Artist and Atlanta Contemporary Art Center.

On May 8, 2001, the funeral of William Moore, aka Willie Haggart, was a raucous affair. Abandoning the somber mood of a typical funeral, the ceremony was a giant party at the National Arena in Kingston, Jamaica. Labeling it a “celebrity event,” Donna P. Hope writes that the style of Haggart’s funeral “ruptured the sobriety and mourning associated with traditional funeral rites.”[1] With this, the[…..]