Craft

Black Box: Sergio Caballero at the Hirshhorn Museum

Sergio Caballero. Ancha La Castilla or N’importe quoi, 2014 (video still); digital video, 24:00. Courtesy of the artist and Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Sergio Caballero combines grotesque materials, low-budget techniques, and a healthy dose of dark humor in his film Ancha La Castilla or N’importe Quoi (2014). Ancha La Castilla is the latest iteration of Black Box, a series dedicated to moving-image works at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. The twenty-five-minute film tells the tale of a young girl named Alegría as she becomes possessed and thus[…..]

Tomás Saraceno: Arachnid Orchestra. Jam Sessions at NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore

Tomás Saraceno, Omega Centauri 1 Nephila Kenianensis 4 Cyrtophora citricola, 2014; Spidersilk, carbon fibre, light, Tripod. Courtesy of the artist and Esther Schipper Gallery, Berlin.

The gallery hums with screechy sounds resembling acoustic feedback, punctuated by random bursts of bass and cartoonish sound effects. The soundscape is queasily amorphous and disorienting, built on dissonance and the chaotic rhythms resonating from a handful of arachnids that have woven fine, thick webs around delicate wire frames. Featuring a plethora of spiderweb sound installations, Tomás Saraceno’s latest show Arachnid Orchestra. Jam Sessions is[…..]

Ken Price: Death Shrine I at the Harwood Museum of Art

Ken Price. Death Shrine I, 1972-76; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Ken Price Studio.

Ken Price is best known for his psychedelic ceramic sculptures: abstractions layered in paint and sanded to pristine finishes. His piece Death Shrine I (1972–1976), permanently installed at the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos, New Mexico, is an unexpected departure from this canon. The shrine is a facet of Price’s Happy’s Curios project, and is one of three such installations inspired by the iconography[…..]

Natasha Nicholson: The Artist in Her Museum at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Natasha Nicholson, Studiolo, installation view, Nicholson studio, 2015. Courtesy of the Artist and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Photo: Mike Rebholz.

If the test for the quality of an exhibition is the richness of associations it generates in a viewer, then Natasha Nicholson: The Artist in Her Museum at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art is a goldmine. The show is installed in the museum as a series of rooms, facsimiles of the artist’s studio: the Thinking Room, Strata (the studio and gallery), the Studiolo (library[…..]

Fan Mail: Victor Solomon

Victor Solomon. You Know I Gotta Show Out, 2015; glass, mirror, lead, 24K gold-plated high polish steel, wood, Swarovski crystal; 44 in x 40 in x 20 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

For a year, Victor Solomon apprenticed with stained-glass masters who taught him everything he needed to know about this oft-forgotten craft. Solomon is not a stained-glass artist, and though he doesn’t particularly aspire to be one, an idea took a hold of him and compelled him to take up this traditional medium. Literally Balling is an ongoing project in which the San Francisco-based artist explores[…..]

Ellen Lesperance: We Were Singing at Adams and Ollman

Ellen Lesperance. We Were Singing, 2015; installation view, Adams and Ollman, Portland. Courtesy of the Artist and Adams and Ollman. Photo: Mario Gallucci.

Not many things are more difficult than articulating love. Displaying a lack of temperance can appear obsessive, while showing any sign of hesitance can be mistaken for a number of unintended things. Every so often, an individual demonstrates the ability to toe the line so eloquently and sincerely that the outcome is a lesson in expert labor. Ellen Lesperance’s exhibition We Were Singing at Adams[…..]

Leo Saul Berk: Structure and Ornament at Frye Art Museum

Leo Saul Berk. Structure and Ornament, 2014; plywood, acrylic; 120 x 213 x 59 in. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Mark Woods.

Can architecture transform lives? Can it transform us? These questions lay the foundation for Structure and Ornament, a solo exhibition of work by Seattle-based artist Leo Saul Berk, on view at Frye Art Museum. Presented in a meandering array of multimedia sculpture, site-specific installation, and video with sound, Berk’s ongoing series is a reflection on his childhood home in Aurora, Illinois—a site formative to his personal and artistic growth. In the[…..]