Craft

Fan Mail: Victor Solomon

Victor Solomon. You Know I Gotta Show Out, 2015; glass, mirror, lead, 24K gold-plated high polish steel, wood, Swarovski crystal; 44 in x 40 in x 20 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

For a year, Victor Solomon apprenticed with stained-glass masters who taught him everything he needed to know about this oft-forgotten craft. Solomon is not a stained-glass artist, and though he doesn’t particularly aspire to be one, an idea took a hold of him and compelled him to take up this traditional medium. Literally Balling is an ongoing project in which the San Francisco-based artist explores[…..]

Ellen Lesperance: We Were Singing at Adams and Ollman

Ellen Lesperance. We Were Singing, 2015; installation view, Adams and Ollman, Portland. Courtesy of the Artist and Adams and Ollman. Photo: Mario Gallucci.

Not many things are more difficult than articulating love. Displaying a lack of temperance can appear obsessive, while showing any sign of hesitance can be mistaken for a number of unintended things. Every so often, an individual demonstrates the ability to toe the line so eloquently and sincerely that the outcome is a lesson in expert labor. Ellen Lesperance’s exhibition We Were Singing at Adams[…..]

Leo Saul Berk: Structure and Ornament at Frye Art Museum

Leo Saul Berk. Structure and Ornament, 2014; plywood, acrylic; 120 x 213 x 59 in. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Mark Woods.

Can architecture transform lives? Can it transform us? These questions lay the foundation for Structure and Ornament, a solo exhibition of work by Seattle-based artist Leo Saul Berk, on view at Frye Art Museum. Presented in a meandering array of multimedia sculpture, site-specific installation, and video with sound, Berk’s ongoing series is a reflection on his childhood home in Aurora, Illinois—a site formative to his personal and artistic growth. In the[…..]

Crafting a Continuum: Rethinking Contemporary Craft at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft

Sonya Clark. Thread Wrapped in Blue and Brown. 2008. Combs and thread. 45 x 1 x 60 inches. Image courtesy of the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft.

Since the rise of conceptual art practices within the ever-changing terrain of contemporary art, one often encounters the silly assertion that art making has become a market of ideas as opposed to objects. This is, of course, ridiculous: A walk through any art fair or biennial reveals that there are more objects in circulation than ever before, some more thoughtful than others. While dematerialization continues,[…..]

Wael Shawky: Cabaret Crusades at MoMA PS1

Wael Shawky. Wael Shawky: Cabaret Crusades, 2015; installation view, MoMA PS1, New York, featuring marionettes from Cabaret Crusades: The Secrets of Karbala, 2015. Courtesy of MoMA PS1, New York, and Sfeir Semler Gallery, Beirut and Hamburg.

Wael Shawky’s gorgeous cinematography, sets, and marionettes fuse a child-like play with the horrors and complications of war and history.

Ding Yi: Ivory Black at ShanghArt

Ding Yi. Appearance of Crosses-13, 2013; acrylic on canvas; 140 cm x 200 cm. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist and ShanghArt gallery Singapore.

“Grids punctured with crosses in varying patterns” is perhaps the best—and admittedly, the most simplistic—way of summing up Ding Yi’s oeuvre. Ivory Black at the ShanghArt gallery is his latest iteration of these basic, severely geometric forms, in varying shades of blue, black, and white hues, distinguished only by date and serial number. Like an astronomer’s chart of the night sky, Ding’s gridded, ordered forms[…..]

Outsider Art Fair 2015

Edward Deeds. Untitled, 1936–66; installed at Hirschl and Adler Modern, Outsider Art Fair 2015. Photo: Lia Wilson.

The 2015 Outsider Art Fair, held at Center 548 in the Chelsea gallery district of New York City, marked the twenty-third iteration of the event. It also occurred within a season of mainstream museums prominently featuring the work of so-called outsider artists in very high-profile, insider art spaces. Judith Scott: Bound and Unbound, the artist’s first retrospective, was held at the Brooklyn Museum in the[…..]