Africa Forecast: Fashioning Contemporary Life at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Fabiola Jean-Louis. Amina, 2016; archival pigment print; 29 x 28.5 inches. Courtesy of the Artist and Alan Avery Art Company (Atlanta, GA).

Spelman College Museum of Fine Art’s current exhibition, Africa Forecast: Fashioning Contemporary Life, presents a small but dynamic assemblage of twenty designers and artists who blur the line between fine art and fashion from across the globe. Co-curated by Spelman Museum’s own Dr. Andrea Barnwell Brownlee and Dr. Erika Dalya Massaquoi to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the institution, this exhibition embodies the curatorial commitments[…..]

Art Dives Underground in Downtown D.C.


Today from our friends at BmoreArt we bring you a piece on an interactive art installation in an abandoned trolley station. Author Brendan L. Smith says of the space, “The curving walls of an oval-shaped room descend like stair steps next to a cluster of miniature buildings that resemble a child’s bristle-block creations.” This article was originally published on April 4, 2016. In an abandoned[…..]

Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway Is a Disco at ARNDT Singapore

Del Kathryn Barton. The highway is a disco, 2015; Acrylic on French linen; 240 × 180 cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Arndt Singapore.

Framed against a starlit sky, two female figures with feathered hair and large, limpid eyes sit astride blue and purple kangaroos. Their lush, naked bodies are stark white against a vibrant canvas of marks, lines, and dots. They stare out of pictorial space into an unknown distance, with their detached gazes separated from the viewer’s own perusal of them. Disengaged from us, their distance forms[…..]

Molly Dilworth: 2421 Miles at ALL RISE

Molly Dilworth. 2421 Miles, 2015; Courtesy of ALL RISE. Photo: Max Cleary

“When I worked for the Seattle Times fifteen years ago, our building overlooked this lot,” remarked Molly Dilworth during a recent artist talk. Her project, 2421 Miles, is a 52,000-square-foot earthwork (organized in collaboration with ALL RISE) located on a vacant city block in the heart of downtown. Returning to the site this spring was a homecoming of sorts for the Brooklyn-based artist. The ALL[…..]

Sky-Lit: Volume, Light, and Sound at the Broad, Los Angeles

Visitors in The Broad’s third-floor gallery space, before art walls are constructed, February 15, 2015. Photo by Ryan Miller / Capture Imaging. Courtesy The Broad.

On Sunday, February 15, the Broad opened its doors on Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles, proving the ease with which hype can be deflated like a big white balloon. The daylong preview offered VIPs—and, in the later afternoon, members of the public—a sneak peek of the still-raw interior of the three-story, 120,000 square-foot, $140 million building. The Broad will house and exhibit its 2,000-work[…..]

Fan Mail: Joe Penrod

Joe Penrod. Deflated (after 3 weeks), 2010; mylar balloons, painter’s tape; 4 x 3 feet. Courtesy of Half/Dozen Gallery.

Typically, the studio is where artists make their work, but Joe Penrod’s space for creative development exists anywhere a shadow falls. Armed with only a roll of cerulean painter’s tape, Penrod transforms once-mundane shadows (and the objects that cast them) into fecund sculptural compositions. There are a few stages in Penrod’s process. First he finds an object that casts a particularly beautiful or striking shadow.[…..]

Locating Technology: Against Recognition

Zach Blas. Facial Weaponization Suite Communiqué: Fag Face, 2012 (video still); HD video; 08:10. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Zach Blas.

From our partners at Art Practical, today we bring you an essay by Emily K. Holmes, who analyzes the work of artist Zach Blas: “Blas creates space for facial-recognition technology to be not only strange, but dangerous and deserving of our critical questioning.” This article was originally published on April 16, 2014. Biometric technologies aim to “authenticate” and “verify” individuals by digitally scanning physical traits on[…..]