Digital Media

Lorna Mills and Her Subversive GIF Art

Lorna Mills. Abrupt Diplomat (still from GIF), 2015. Courtesy of Transfer Gallery.

From our friends at Canadian Art, today we bring you a feature on the Toronto-based artist Lorna Mills. Author Simon Lewsen (@SimonLewsen) notes, “The intensity of Mills’ art is rooted not just in the proliferation of images but also in their strange choreography.” This article was originally published on July 1, 2015. In the fall of 2014, Lorna Mills, the Toronto-based net artist, was exhibiting[…..]

Night Begins the Day: Rethinking Space, Time, and Beauty at the Contemporary Jewish Musuem

Laurent Grasso. Soleil Noir, 2014; 16mm film, looped; 11:40. Courtesy of the Artist, Galerie Perrotin, and the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Mary Coyne reviews Night Begins the Day: Rethinking Space, Time, and Beauty at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco.  Night Begins the Day is a meditative,[…..]

Simon Denny: The Innovator’s Dilemma at MoMA PS1

Simon Denny. New Management, 2014; installation view, Portikus, Frankfurt. Photo: Helena Schlichting. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Startup culture is ripe for satire. The tech industry’s social and economic dominance makes it a necessary target, and its penchant for jargon-heavy, wildly inflated rhetoric makes it an easy one. Mike Judge’s HBO sitcom, Silicon Valley, deftly picks the low-hanging fruit, but it hardly needs to. The elevator pitches of most weak-to-average startups on the venture-capital trail, quixotically ascribing revolutionary potential to the most[…..]

Jillian Mayer: Touchers at Aspect/Ratio

Jillian Mayer. 34.11° N, -118.26° W at 53’ inches, 2015; 46.2 x 26 in. Photograph printed on fabric. Courtesy of the Artist, Aspect/Ratio Chicago, and David Castillo, Miami.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Nicole Lane reviews Jillian Mayer: Touchers at Aspect/Ratio in Chicago. Jillian Mayer’s first solo exhibition in Chicago, Touchers, features two photographic works and a video installation[…..]

William Larson: Fireflies at Gitterman Gallery

William Larson. Untitled, 1971; electro-carbon print; 11 x 8 ½ in. © William Larson. Courtesy Gitterman Gallery.

The constant stream of digital information traveling around us over wires and airways is an increasingly recognized phenomenon. Over the past two decades, many artists have begun exploring the seemingly limitless possibilities of digital communication. However, long before the integration of once-mysterious electronic media into the art world in the 1990s, William Larson used a Graphic Sciences DEX 1 Teleprinter to produce some of the[…..]

Todd McDonald: Visual Feedback at Redux Contemporary Art Center

Todd McDonald. Go In to Get Out, 2014; oil on panel; 48 x 72 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

The gesture which we would reproduce on canvas shall no longer be a fixed moment in universal dynamism. It shall simply be the dynamic sensation itself. — Umberto Boccioni, et al, 1910 Todd McDonald’s Visual Feedback at Redux Contemporary Art Center addresses new modes of processing and viewing digital images as part of a painting practice. McDonald collects photographs of architectural elements and urban landscapes in[…..]

Street View / Road to Mecha by Jonathan Zawada, and Drone directed by Tonje Hessen Schei

Jonathan Zawada, Street View / Road to Mecha, 2013; screen shot, Brooklyn, NY. Photo: Amelia Rina

O bitter is the knowledge that one draws from the voyage! The monotonous and tiny world, today, Yesterday, tomorrow, always, shows us our reflections, An oasis of horror in a desert of boredom! —Charles Baudelaire, Le Voyage (1861)[1] Despite the seemingly endless portrayal in the media of increased violence around the world, statistical analysis suggests that, as a species, humans have become less violent.[2] I wonder,[…..]