Digital Media

Fan Mail: Ewa Doroszenko

Ewa Doroszenko. Image from the series The Promise of Sublime Words, 2016; digital print; size variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

It can be difficult to tell which parts of Ewa Doroszenko’s works are digital and which are physical, though perhaps this lack of distinction is what makes her series The Promise of Sublime Words most potent. By combining digital and analog processes so seamlessly, Doroszenko’s practice blurs their boundaries to the point of meaninglessness. The result is a body of work that demands a reevaluation[…..]

Printed Matters – Mass Effect: Art and the Internet in the Twenty-First Century

Cover image of "Mass Effect," featuring Cory Arcangel, "Drei Klavierstücke op. 11," 2009 (still); single-channel video, sound, color; 15:58 min. Courtesy of the Artist and Team Gallery, New York.

Published in 2015, Mass Effect: Art and the Internet in the Twenty-First Century, edited by Lauren Cornell and Ed Halter, is a hefty tome for an art genre that still seems young and new. A compilation of essays from artists, art writers, and curators, the anthology takes on the subject of internet art in depth. It should come as no surprise that the topic is[…..]

From the Archives – Time After Time: The Clock at SFMOMA

Christian Marclay, video still from The Clock, 2010; single-channel video with stereo sound, 24 hours; courtesy the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York. All photos from Christian Marclay: The Clock; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

In June 2013, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art closed its doors to begin a massive expansion project. This weekend is the first public reopening of the museum, which now holds the status of the largest museum (by square footage) dedicated to modern art. Today we bring you a flashback to those last few hours at SFMOMA three years ago, when Christian Marclay’s The Clock[…..]

Virtual Absence and Presence in the Museum of Stolen Art

Ziv Schneider. Art Detective: The Museum of Stolen Art, 2015; Android VR app. Courtesy of the Artist.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you the most recent edition of their popular “Locating Technology” column, a consideration of the Museum of Stolen Art (MOSA). Author Genevieve Quick notes that “MOSA capitalizes on the unknown: the whereabouts of the artworks, sometimes the conditions of their theft or looting. Rather than explaining the significance of given artworks as conventional museums do, MOSA poses questions about their[…..]

James Hoff: Bricking at the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans

James Hoff. Skywiper No. 50, 2015; Chromaluxe transfer on aluminum; 60 x 40 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Callicoon Fine Arts, New York.

James Hoff: B=R=I=C=K=I=N=G is the first solo museum exhibition of the artist’s “virus paintings”—works shaped and mediated by Hoff’s engagement with digital technology and computer viruses as opposed to brush or paint. Functioning as a series of études to contemporary computer code, these paintings flirt consciously with the provocative gestures and meta-questions of conceptual art and the heavy visual language and history of abstraction. Shaped[…..]

Gilberto Esparza: Cultivos at Laboratorio Arte Alameda

Gilberto Esparza. Plantas autofotosintéticas, 2013-2014; polycarbonate, carbon fiber, stainless steel, silicone, acrylic, electronic circuits, waste water and aquatic ecosystem. Courtesy of Laboratorio Arte Alameda.

Sheltered by darkness, a mysterious octopus-like artifact lies in the nave of the Laboratorio Arte Alameda, a contemporary art museum housed in what was once an ancient convent. Capable of creating light and life by itself, the machine artifact operates by complex mechanisms. Twelve cylinders containing microbial fuel cells are connected to a main Plexiglas tank that houses plants in its interior. Every cylinder carries wastewater from various[…..]

Como fantasmas que vienen de las sombras… y en las sombras, se van at Espacio de Arte Contemporáneo

Jazael Olguín. Paisaje molar, 2015; black marker and three paintings. Courtesy of ESPAC.

Like with mazes and haunted houses, there’s a magnetic appeal in unraveling the mysteries that fictitious places offer. We enjoy undefined atmospheres where a strange comfort assures the encounter with the unknown and is met with the thrill of discovery. Because our sense of control struggles with the powerful forces of uncertainty, we are challenged by our own idea of self-representation, despite being aware that[…..]