Digital Media

If the World Changed: Singapore Biennale 2013

Teamlab. Peace Can Be Realized Even Without Order, 2012; interactive digital installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist and Singapore Art Museum.

Premised on the obliquely hypothetical question “What if the world changed?”, the Singapore Biennale 2013 (SB2013) is presented as a deconstructed entity centered on allusive keywords—or “tags” in internetspeak—such as “histories,” “intervention,” and “materiality” in order to highlight the transmutative and the transformative qualities of the art produced in the region. With a collaborative team of 27 curators instead of an artistic director helming the show,[.....]

The Fun of the Fair: Sydney Contemporary

Kim Joon, Bird Land - Chrysler, 2008, digital print, 47 x 83 inches, Sundaram Tagore Gallery, Hong Kong, New York, Singapore

Depending on who you ask, anywhere between eight thousand and thirteen thousand people attended the vernissage of the world’s newest art fair, Sydney Contemporary. By the end of three and a half days, the fair had attracted almost twenty-nine thousand visitors eager to see the offerings from eighty-three Australian and international galleries, presenting the work of more than three hundred artists. The physical scale was[.....]

Shifting Spaces: Here Is Where We Jump at El Museo de Barrio

The title of El Museo del Barrio’s biennial exhibit Here Is Where We Jump refers to one of Aesop’s Fables, “The Braggart.” In the tale, a man boasts of an extraordinary jump he once made in Rhodes. He claims witnesses will attest to the jump if the listeners ever visit his home country. Eventually, someone challenges the man to reproduce the jump, saying, “Jump here, jump now.[.....]

#Hashtags: On the Political in Art

Thomas Hirschhorn. Gramsci Monument, 2013. Children's Class. Forest Houses, Bronx, New York. Courtesy Dia Art Foundation. Photo by Romain Lopez.

#race #class #access #commerce #representation #empowerment #codeswitching As the values of the contemporary art elite veer ever farther toward commerce, art with a social justice conscience is rallying in New York—arguably the center of the global art market. This summer, three prominent artists known for their political consciences have been drawing attention for thoughtful, research-heavy projects. In Chelsea, Hank Willis Thomas and the team of William Powhida and Jade Townsend have[.....]

Deeply Concentric: An Interview with Yael Kanarek

Yael Kanarek. Installation view (l-r): Sanctify Thyself No. 1; Deeply Concentric; Perpetual Dream Catcher; all 2013. Photo by John Berens. Image courtesy bitforms gallery nyc.

Yael Kanarek is interested in the signs and systems that we use to quantify and communicate knowledge, specifically words and numbers. She focuses on the spaces where meaning is conveyed or lost as it passes through cultural and disciplinary frameworks, while her work fluctuates between painting, sculpture, and time-based interactivity. She has exhibited at The Drawing Center and in the 2002 Whitney Biennial and has received numerous awards,[.....]

Postscript: An Ambitious Take on Conceptual Art and Writing at the Power Plant

Kenneth Goldsmith, Soliloquy, 1996.

Upon entering Toronto’s Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery to see Postscript: Writing After Conceptual Art, the viewer is immediately confronted by a raucous wash of sonorous elements. Over fifty artists and conceptual writers occupy the gallery space; canonical works from Andy Warhol, Sol LeWitt, Marcel Broodthaers, Carl Andre, and Dan Graham are nestled among pieces by contemporary practitioners, contributing to the sense of saturation. Originally curated[.....]

Perchance to Dream at Andrea Meislin Gallery

Adi Nes, Untitled, 1999 Digital C-print

Perchance to Dream, a group exhibition on view at New York’s Andrea Meislin Gallery, features twenty-five international artists’ photographs that relate to the Shakespeare quote referenced in the show’s title. We see napping children, embracing couples in bed, homeless men on the street, passed-out teenagers on the beach, and even an abandoned, sleeping dog. We also see the strange addition of soiled and torn mattress “landscapes,” presented[.....]