Drawing

Fan Mail: Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith. Marnix Incident, 2012; ink, watercolor, collage, rubber stamps on paper; 24 ¾ x 19 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Patricia Smith’s mapping practice concretizes the ephemeral. Inverting the Situationists’ concept of psychogeography, in which the experience of a place affects a person’s psychological state or behavior, Smith’s maps reinterpret spaces with reference to specific events or feelings. The Incidents series refers to particular moments in time and space. Like any attempt at describing sensation or memory, the results shift and undulate, making room for[…..]

Fathi Hassan: Edge of Memory at Clark Atlanta University Art Museum

Fathi Hassan. Crossing, 2016; acrylic and gauze on paper; 58.25 x 74.8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

In his 1978 text Orientalism, Edward Said states that the “subtle and persistent Eurocentric prejudice against Arab–Islamic peoples and their cultures” is not just bound by historical clashes, sociocultural differences, or geography, but a constellation of a “whole series of interests” predicated on the desire to control, manipulate, and incorporate “what is manifestly different.”[1] Under Western hegemonic power, the struggle for dominance in the Middle[…..]

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World at the Hammer Museum

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World, installation view, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, January 29 – May 7, 2017. Photo: Brian Forrest.

Among obsidian stones, an upturned police barricade, a beat-up refrigerator, and cow vertebrae, the detail that lingers longest in Jimmie Durham’s retrospective, on view at the Hammer Museum, is Durham’s absence. Born in Arkansas in 1940, Durham left the United States thirty years ago for Europe and has largely refrained from exhibiting in the U.S. since, giving a provocative tone to the retrospective’s title, At[…..]

Fan Mail: Fei Li

Fei Li. The Hidden Dimension and Other Observations, installation view, 2016; ink on paper, mirrors; dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist.

Experiencing Fei Li’s landscapes is like walking into a jungle. Her tangled calligraphy leaps and coils across the paper like vines, folding in associations with visual language; the disparate sensations of walking through dense vegetation and reading a scrawled manuscript are flattened into one experience, such that the idea that the two were ever separate seems like an abstract theory. Li’s work suggests an almost[…..]

#Hashtags: Masculine-Feminine

Iggy Pop Life Class by Jeremy Deller. Organized by the Brooklyn Museum, February 21, 2016. © Brooklyn Museum. Photo: Elena Olivo.

In response to the Trump administration’s ongoing display of toxic masculinity at work, the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth Sackler Center for Feminist Art has taken the unusual but vital step of incorporating a project about male identity into their “Year of Yes” thematic takeover of the museum. Iggy Pop Life Class by Jeremy Deller is an inquiry into the nature of manhood, corroborated with art-historical artifacts[…..]

Interview with Njideka Akunyili Crosby

I Refuse to Be Invisible, 2011, acrylic, charcoal, and xerox transfer on paper, 24 × 16 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Today from our friends at BOMB Magazine, we bring you author Erica Ando’s interview with Nigerian artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby. Crosby says of her paintings, “I always make sure the woman is in a position of power—where her agency is not questioned and where she is an active participant.” This article was originally published in BOMB 137: Fall 2016. The figures who people Njideka Akunyili Crosby’s[…..]

An Atlas of Mirrors: Singapore Biennale 2016

Titarubi. History Repeats Itself, 2016; Gold-plated nutmeg, copper-plated wood, nickel-plated wood, burnt wood, sampan, wood, aluminium, copper, soil, light and nutmeg perfume; Dimensions variable. Image courtesy of Singapore Art Museum.

There is no shortage of mirrors and maps in the fifth iteration of the Singapore Biennale. Glass mirrors in Harumi Yukutake’s Paracosmos (2016) curve around the main circular stairwell of the Singapore Art Museum, dazzling the eye as light hits their multiple reflective surfaces. Dozens of mirrors appear in their reflections; dozens more yet, to the power of infinity, show up in the reflections of their reflections. In[…..]