Drawing

Ding Yi: Ivory Black at ShanghArt

Ding Yi. Appearance of Crosses-13, 2013; acrylic on canvas; 140 cm x 200 cm. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist and ShanghArt gallery Singapore.

“Grids punctured with crosses in varying patterns” is perhaps the best—and admittedly, the most simplistic—way of summing up Ding Yi’s oeuvre. Ivory Black at the ShanghArt gallery is his latest iteration of these basic, severely geometric forms, in varying shades of blue, black, and white hues, distinguished only by date and serial number. Like an astronomer’s chart of the night sky, Ding’s gridded, ordered forms[…..]

Outsider Art Fair 2015

Edward Deeds. Untitled, 1936–66; installed at Hirschl and Adler Modern, Outsider Art Fair 2015. Photo: Lia Wilson.

The 2015 Outsider Art Fair, held at Center 548 in the Chelsea gallery district of New York City, marked the twenty-third iteration of the event. It also occurred within a season of mainstream museums prominently featuring the work of so-called outsider artists in very high-profile, insider art spaces. Judith Scott: Bound and Unbound, the artist’s first retrospective, was held at the Brooklyn Museum in the[…..]

Oscar Muñoz: Sedimentaciones at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum

Oscar Muñoz. Sedimentaciones, 2015; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist, the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, Tampa, and the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection, Miami.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Danny Olda reviews Oscar Muñoz: Sedimentaciones at the University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum in Tampa.  The gallery is dark save for the surface of three[…..]

Justin Mortimer: Sevastopol at Future Perfect

Justin Mortimer. Jabalya, 2014; oil on canvas; 50 x 70 cm (detail). Photo: courtesy of the Artist and Future Perfect Asia, Singapore.

Annexed by Russia in 1782 during the reign of Catherine the Great, Sevastopol became an important naval base to the Russian Black Sea Fleet only to fall decades later to allied British, French, and Turkish troops during the Crimean War (1853–56) after a long, protracted siege that lasted eleven months. During the existence of the Soviet Union, the famous fortress city was transferred to the Ukrainian[…..]

Tomi Ungerer: All in One at the Drawing Center

2.	Tomi Ungerer. Untitled (drawing for The Party), 1966; ink and ink wash on paper;
18 x 18 in. Courtesy of the Collection Musée Tomi Ungerer – Centre
international de l’Illustration, Strasbourg. Photo: Musées de la Ville de Strasbourg/Mathieu Bertola.

Tomi Ungerer: All in One, now on view at the Drawing Center, is a joyful retrospective of the artist’s career as children’s-book author, satirical cartoonist, political illustrator, and erotic artist. Sadly it’s also incredibly timely. Because though Ungerer was a beloved illustrator, he was also rejected for the explicit imagery in his political and erotic work. As we engage in a global conversation about shock[…..]

Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions at El Museo del Barrio

Adal Maldonado (ADAL). El Spanglish Sandwich, 2000; printed ceramic plate and stand; 8-inch diam. Courtesy of El Museo del Barrio.

Declarations of dissent can manifest in many ways. Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions, currently on view at El Museo del Barrio, surveys a range of Latin American and Caribbean artists who through their art practices have voiced their dissent from oppressive cultural forces. The curator, Nicolás Dumit Estévez, frames these artistic impulses as foundational to the history and spirit of[…..]

Art & Language: Nobody Spoke at Lisson Gallery

Art & Language. Installation shot of Drawings From the Winter. 2012-2013. Ink on paper. 41.2 x 29.7 cm each.

Retrospectives are tricky things—despite the often incomplete, reductive, and forced nature of the form, it is the curatorial genre put into action the most, and the one that most easily conforms to the logic of the museum and the market through its presentation of the individual artist’s career as linear and progressive. Audiences love them, art historians and critics love to complain about them, and[…..]