Interview with Erica Prince

Some Sense of Comfort With Some Sense of Confusio​​n​, 2014​, (performance still). Courtesy of AUX Performance Space, Philadelphia​.​

Canadian artist Erica Prince would not appreciate the Mattel playhouse I had as a kid, filled with floral furniture, plastic appliances, and female dolls to ensure that the household was running smoothly. Prince’s version, recently on view in Philadelphia, is my playhouse’s conceptual opposite—and that’s a wonderful thing. Prince is more inspired by science fiction than by domesticity. Her sculptures, installations, and drawings have a[…..]

Beverly Buchanan: And You May Find Yourself… at Andrew Edlin Gallery

Beverly Buchanan. Old Colored School, 2010; wood and paint; 20.25 x 14.75 x 18.5 in (51.4 x 37.5 x 47 cm). Courtesy Andrew Edlin Gallery.

Though certainly no stranger to the art world, Beverly Buchanan has followed an unusual trajectory in her career and public profile as an artist. Born in 1940 in North Carolina, and raised in South Carolina, she spent much of her childhood accompanying her father, an agricultural scientist, while he visited sharecroppers in far-flung locations throughout the rural South, observing the lives and structures they made[…..]

Entang Wiharso: Never Say No at Singapore Tyler Print Institute

Entang Wiharso. Shelter: Forest of Eyes, 2015; Aluminium sheet, laser cut, C-type print; 127 × 184 × 3 cm. Courtesy of STPI.

Set in profile, a man casts a doleful eye on a smaller figure that perches on his forehead and pulls insistently at his tongue, while a miniature chainsaw balances threateningly on his head. The palm of his hand is pierced with a plant-like dagger, and little bodies tumble out feet-first from the bottom of his torso, already bearing knives and swords in preparation for a skirmish.[…..]

William Larson: Fireflies at Gitterman Gallery

William Larson. Untitled, 1971; electro-carbon print; 11 x 8 ½ in. © William Larson. Courtesy Gitterman Gallery.

The constant stream of digital information traveling around us over wires and airways is an increasingly recognized phenomenon. Over the past two decades, many artists have begun exploring the seemingly limitless possibilities of digital communication. However, long before the integration of once-mysterious electronic media into the art world in the 1990s, William Larson used a Graphic Sciences DEX 1 Teleprinter to produce some of the[…..]

Nature/Revelation at the Ian Potter Museum

Berndnaut Smilde, 
Nimbus D'Aspremont
digital C-type print mounted on diabond
75 x 110 cm 
Courtesy the artist and Ronchini Gallery, London

Entering Nature/Revelation, in the rather hushed surrounds of Melbourne University’s Ian Potter Museum, the first thing visitors encounter is an enormous sperm whale. Looming in the darkened space, it has a startling presence and gravitas, even more so when you realize it’s a graphite drawing. Its skin is pitted, marked and scarred by travels through a world still mysterious to us, and its tiny eye regards us mournfully.[…..]

From the Archives – David Schutter: What Is Not Clear Is Not French at Rhona Hoffman Gallery

David Schutter, L LB dc 59, 2011-2014; chalk and crayon on paper; 13.375 x 9.375 inches. Courtesy Rhona Hoffman Gallery.

The 2015 Rome Prize winners include artists Mark Boulos, Emily Jacir, Senam Okudzeto, and David Schutter, and today from our archives we bring you a review of Schutter’s last show at Rhona Hoffman Gallery in Chicago. Author Steve Ruiz notes, “The strongest tension in David Schutter’s paintings is between their historical referents and their contemporary interpretation.” This article was originally published on May 28, 2014. At first appearance,[…..]

Ding Yi: Ivory Black at ShanghArt

Ding Yi. Appearance of Crosses-13, 2013; acrylic on canvas; 140 cm x 200 cm. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist and ShanghArt gallery Singapore.

“Grids punctured with crosses in varying patterns” is perhaps the best—and admittedly, the most simplistic—way of summing up Ding Yi’s oeuvre. Ivory Black at the ShanghArt gallery is his latest iteration of these basic, severely geometric forms, in varying shades of blue, black, and white hues, distinguished only by date and serial number. Like an astronomer’s chart of the night sky, Ding’s gridded, ordered forms[…..]