Drawing

Interview with Robin Rhode

Robin Rhode. Chalk Bicycle (detail), 2011-2015; chalk and steel bicycle. Courtesy of the Artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York. Photo: Max Yawney.

Today from our friends at BOMB, we bring you an interview with artist Robin Rhode. Author Lee Ann Norman talks with Rhode about his upcoming performance Erwartung: A Street Opera for Performa 15, growing up in South Africa, and “what it means to make art in an increasingly globalized world.” This article was originally published on August 13, 2015. Cape Town-born and Berlin-based multidisciplinary artist[…..]

UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991-2015 at the Hammer Museum

Frances Stark. Bobby Jesus’s Alma Mater b/w Reading the Book of David	and/or Paying Attention Is Free, 2013; multichannel projection with sound, inkjet 	mural, and takeaway offset posters; 7:20 min. Installation view, Carnegie International, 2013. Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Brian Conley.

In a mid-career survey as large as UH-OH: Frances Stark 1991–2015, on view at the Hammer Museum, I’m usually tempted to rush over a couple of galleries and maybe even skip a video here or there. From the get-go, Stark’s exhibition, featuring 125 drawings, collages, paintings, and video installations, had me enthralled with My Best Thing (2011), a 100-minute-long episodic animation based on the artist’s[…..]

Michael Waugh: Boom at Von Lintel Gallery

Michael Waugh. Derivative (FCIR, part 5), 2015 (detail); ink on mylar; 42 x 65 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Von Lintel Gallery.

Michael Waugh’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, Boom, is currently on view at Von Lintel Gallery. Using ink on Mylar, Waugh reimagines an assortment of 19th-century tableaux, depicting quaint scenes of countryside estates and horse stables, as well as turn-of-the-century buildings on New York City streets. These representational drawings consist wholly of handwritten text: Scribbled sentences produce the contour lines of buildings as they[…..]

Jay DeFeo/Alter Ego at Hosfelt Gallery

Jay DeFeo, Untitled, 1973; gelatin silver print, 7 3/4 x 9 9/16 in., Estate no. P0778A. May not be reproduced in any form without permission of The Jay DeFeo Trust, © 2015 The Jay DeFeo Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of Jay DeFeo/Alter Ego at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Author Anton Stuebner notes, “In reconceptualizing the forms of her everyday life, DeFeo’s work suggests the importance of embracing the imaginary and the real as necessary complements.” This article was originally published on October 1, 2015. Shadows suffuse Jay DeFeo’s work. In her gelatin silver prints,[…..]

Fan Mail: Julia Westerbeke

Julia Westerbeke. Geophony, 2015 (detail); punctured and carved paper; 22 in x 15 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Using strategies of asymmetry and organic mirroring, Julia Westerbeke explores abstraction as a vehicle of human imagination and a catalyst for subconscious thought. The artist cites science fiction and the biology of natural forms as two of her main sources of inspiration, and her paper-based explorations evoke a certain duality inherent within organic life—the ordinary morphing into the extraordinary, the mundane inspiring spurts of wonder.[…..]

Ellen Lesperance: We Were Singing at Adams and Ollman

Ellen Lesperance. We Were Singing, 2015; installation view, Adams and Ollman, Portland. Courtesy of the Artist and Adams and Ollman. Photo: Mario Gallucci.

Not many things are more difficult than articulating love. Displaying a lack of temperance can appear obsessive, while showing any sign of hesitance can be mistaken for a number of unintended things. Every so often, an individual demonstrates the ability to toe the line so eloquently and sincerely that the outcome is a lesson in expert labor. Ellen Lesperance’s exhibition We Were Singing at Adams[…..]

Drawing Sound Part II: Alvin Lucier at the Drawing Center

2.	Alvin Lucier. Bird and Person Dyning, 1975 (performance still); Drawing Center, New York; September 11, 2015; Alvin Lucier, performer. Courtesy of the Drawing Center. Photo: Chris Bradley.

To enter the main gallery at the Drawing Center for a recent performance, we couldn’t use its front doors. Instead, we had to descend the stairs near the lobby, walk along the lower-level corridor from the front to the back of the building, ascend the rear stairs, and pass through the smaller gallery called the Drawing Room. There, the walls were adorned with several wooden[…..]