Fiber Arts

Happy Thanksgiving!

Mappa, 1989
46 3/4 x 86 3/4 inches (118.7 x 220.3 cm)

Here at Daily Serving, we’re thankful for you—our fantastic community of writers, editors, and readers—and for the labor of arts workers around the world who enrich our lives every day. And while we celebrate, we’ll also be thinking of the arbitrariness of national borders, and of people who move toward a better life and are greeted with compassion and hospitality.

Del Kathryn Barton: The Highway Is a Disco at ARNDT Singapore

Del Kathryn Barton. The highway is a disco, 2015; Acrylic on French linen; 240 × 180 cm. Courtesy of the Artist and Arndt Singapore.

Framed against a starlit sky, two female figures with feathered hair and large, limpid eyes sit astride blue and purple kangaroos. Their lush, naked bodies are stark white against a vibrant canvas of marks, lines, and dots. They stare out of pictorial space into an unknown distance, with their detached gazes separated from the viewer’s own perusal of them. Disengaged from us, their distance forms[…..]

Franz Erhard Walther and Pae White at the Henry Art Gallery

Franz Erhard Walther. Sehkanal (with body weight and exertion exposing one's opposite number to one's gaze - sight channel) Single Element n°46 of 1.Werksatz, 1968. Green fabric: 30 x 740 x 20 cm. Courtesy of Galerie Jocelyn Wolff. Photo credit: Timm Rautert. Copyright Franz Erhard Walther Foundation, Timm Rautert.

The Henry Art Gallery in Seattle opens two exhibitions, Franz Erhard Walther: The Body Draws and Pae White: Command-Shift-4. The featured artists—albeit separated by 24 years and 5,600 miles—create a compelling juxtaposition, revealing shared interests in graphic art, architecture, and fiber as mediums that shift between sculpture and performance. Both artists produce works that are liminal and in flux—forever making and remaking themselves through direct interaction.[…..]

Fan Mail: Julia Westerbeke

Julia Westerbeke. Geophony, 2015 (detail); punctured and carved paper; 22 in x 15 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Using strategies of asymmetry and organic mirroring, Julia Westerbeke explores abstraction as a vehicle of human imagination and a catalyst for subconscious thought. The artist cites science fiction and the biology of natural forms as two of her main sources of inspiration, and her paper-based explorations evoke a certain duality inherent within organic life—the ordinary morphing into the extraordinary, the mundane inspiring spurts of wonder.[…..]

Ellen Lesperance: We Were Singing at Adams and Ollman

Ellen Lesperance. We Were Singing, 2015; installation view, Adams and Ollman, Portland. Courtesy of the Artist and Adams and Ollman. Photo: Mario Gallucci.

Not many things are more difficult than articulating love. Displaying a lack of temperance can appear obsessive, while showing any sign of hesitance can be mistaken for a number of unintended things. Every so often, an individual demonstrates the ability to tow the line so eloquently and sincerely that the outcome is a lesson in expert labor. Ellen Lesperance’s exhibition We Were Singing at Adams[…..]

Entang Wiharso: Never Say No at Singapore Tyler Print Institute

Entang Wiharso. Shelter: Forest of Eyes, 2015; Aluminium sheet, laser cut, C-type print; 127 × 184 × 3 cm. Courtesy of STPI.

Set in profile, a man casts a doleful eye on a smaller figure that perches on his forehead and pulls insistently at his tongue, while a miniature chainsaw balances threateningly on his head. The palm of his hand is pierced with a plant-like dagger, and little bodies tumble out feet-first from the bottom of his torso, already bearing knives and swords in preparation for a skirmish.[…..]

Diedrick Brackens: This Is Real Life at Johansson Projects

Diedrick Brackens. 10-79, 2015; hand-woven fabric, nylon, chenille, hand-dyed cotton, bleach; 66 x 14 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Johansson Projects, Oakland.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you a review of This Is Real Life, artist Diedrick Brackens’ current solo show at Johansson Projects in Oakland. Author Anton Stuebner notes, “By invoking […] histories and their associations, Brackens acknowledges that seemingly innocuous devices can produce real and violent effects.” This article was originally published on March 31, 2015. Diedrick Brackens’ show at Johansson Projects, This Is Real[…..]