Fiber Arts

Summer Session – Honor our Wrinkles: Fiber, Women, Dykes and Queers

L.J. Roberts. Daniel Rosza Lang/Levitsky Singing at the 2013 NYC Dyke March, 2013; single-strand embroidery on cotton; 4 x 8 in. Courtesy of the Artist.

Continuing our labor-themed Summer Session, today we bring you a thoughtful conversation between the artists L.J. Roberts and Sheila Pepe. Roberts asks, “What does it mean to have men who are making work that pertains to being a man—about men, male desire, and masculinity—appropriating traditional women’s work and theory that is grounded in feminism, without much accountability?” This interview was originally published on our sister site Art Practical on February 26,[…..]

Summer Session: Rug of War

L-R: a 1998 war rug from Baghlan showing a map of Afghanistan (acquired in Peshawar), a 1994 rug from western Afghanistan (also acquired in Peshawar), and a 2004 rug (acquired in Kabul). Image courtesy of REORIENT.

Today from our friends at REORIENT, we bring you an excerpt from Elnaz Bokharachi’s consideration of Afghan War Rugs: The Modern Art of Central Asia at the Scotsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. In keeping with our Summer Session theme of labor, the author discusses weaving, production, and the impact of war on both. This article was originally published on September 21, 2015. Rug weaving amongst the Iranian peoples dates back[…..]

Summer Session – Material Practices: Stitching, Fabric, and Textiles in the Work of Contemporary Chinese Artists

Lin Tianmiao, Badges, 2011-12, White silk, colored silk thread, painted stainless steel embroidery frame, sound component, Installation, dimensions variable. Individual diameters of 55, 80, 100, and 120 cm. Image courtesy the artist

Continuing our June Summer Session theme of labor, today we bring you this review that deals with gendered, often invisible labor. Author Luise Guest explores the work of several contemporary Chinese artists using embroidery in revolutionary ways. This article was originally published on January 10, 2014. Mao Zedong once said that revolution is not a dinner party. Less famously, he said it is not embroidery, either. Interestingly,[…..]

Celebrating a Vision: Art and Disability at SFO

Susan Wise. Baskets, 2015; mixed media; variable dimensions. Courtesy of the Artist and NIAD Art Center, Oakland.

Shotgun Reviews are an open forum where we invite the international art community to contribute timely, short-format responses to an exhibition or event. If you are interested in submitting a Shotgun Review, please click this link for more information. In this Shotgun Review, Ángel Rafael Vázquez-Concepción reviews Celebrating a Vision: Art and Disability at the San Francisco International Airport Terminal Three Gallery. Traveling via San Francisco International Airport (SFO)[…..]

From the Archives – Weaving, Not Cloth: Mark Bradford at SFMOMA

Mark Bradford, Potable Water, 2005; billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, and additional mixed media; 130 x 196 inches; collection of Hunter Gray; © Mark Bradford; photo: Bruce M. White

We always like to see artist Mark Bradford’s name pop up in the press. Of course, there’s the fantastic news that Bradford will be representing the U.S. in this year’s Venice Biennale, in addition to last week’s cheekily delivered critique of art auctions (while onsite at Christie’s). Today, we’re republishing Bean Gilsdorf’s meditations on the tactility of Bradford’s work in relation to textiles. This article[…..]

Gabrielle Teschner: In the Offing at Irving Street Projects

Gabrielle Teschner. In the Offing, 2016; installation view. Courtesy of the Artist and Irving Street Projects.

Today from our partners at Art Practical, we bring you Vanessa Kauffman’s review of Gabrielle Teschner’s In the Offing at Irving Street Projects in San Francisco. The author notes, “Teschner’s works epitomize a high standard of craft, but by the same turn they destabilize ready-made, rigid perceptions of architectural perfection.” This article was originally published on March 29, 2016. “The offing” is the farthest point the eye can see when[…..]

Invisible Presence: Bling Memories at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center

Ebony G. Patterson. Invisible Presence: Bling Memories, 2014; installation view, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Courtesy of the Artist and Atlanta Contemporary Art Center.

On May 8, 2001, the funeral of William Moore, aka Willie Haggart, was a raucous affair. Abandoning the somber mood of a typical funeral, the ceremony was a giant party at the National Arena in Kingston, Jamaica. Labeling it a “celebrity event,” Donna P. Hope writes that the style of Haggart’s funeral “ruptured the sobriety and mourning associated with traditional funeral rites.”[1] With this, the[…..]