Fiber Arts

HAIRY: An Interview with Chris Sollars

For the last year, Bay Area artist Chris Sollars has sported a biblical behemoth of a beard, although his cleanly shaven cheeks are once again on view in Sollars’s newest project, Hairy, shown as part of YBCA’s Bay Area Now.  It’s an interesting update on an identity-probing lineage that includes predecessors like Chris Burden, Gordon Matta Clark, James Luna, Ana Mendieta, and David Hammons.  DailyServing[…..]

Art, Inside and Out

The growing spotlight on artists with developmental disabilities simultaneously questions ethics, challenges definitions in Art and inspires viewers. The current exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive, Create, features the works of 20 artists from three pioneering Bay Area centers for arts and disability – Creativity Explored, Creative Growth Art Center and the National Institute of Art and Disabilities. Once in the museum, I[…..]

Interview with Glenn Adamson

Today’s interview is from our friends at Art Practical, where Bean Gilsdorf gets a chance to chat with Glenn Adamson, deputy head of research and head of Graduate Studies at the Victoria and Albert Museum, where he leads a graduate program in the History of Design. My interest in Glenn Adamson’s work began in 2006 with his essay “Handy-Crafts: A Doctrine,” which is included in[…..]

Allison Smith at MCA Denver

Fancy Work (Braided Rug), 2010-2011

The contemporary art world – accepting as it may be of the most oblique artistic practices – still responds tentatively to artists engaging with notions of craft. Yet, at a time when the handmade – a once integral part of everyday life – has become a luxury, craft can serve as a potent commentary on our history and national identity. In Piece Work, an exhibition[…..]

Maybe Techno Doesn’t Suck? Cosima von Bonin and Moritz von Oswald, The Juxtaposition of Nothings at Friedrich Petzel

This show reminds me of the time I danced for hours at a club in Cologne, caught part of an arthouse film next door, and then somehow ended up at a bar where a bunch of people I didn’t know were drinking like it was the end of the earth. Ok, so that never happened. But I feel like Cosima von Bonin’s current show, The[…..]

Ariadne’s Thread

L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast A weekly column by Catherine Wagley When Richard Strauss’ indulgent opera Ariadne Auf Naxos had its U.S. premiere at the Met in 1962, critic Everett Helm was more than underwhelmed; he was exasperated. The whole show, he wrote, “makes dupes of the audience, being all form but having no real content.” It was “theatrically flabby,” “silly and contrived.”[…..]

Linnea Glatt: With In

The work in this exhibition at Barry Whistler Gallery by Linnea Glatt is methodical, precise and quietly moving. While the works are often visually minimal, using only black and white, circles, lines and dots, they have a presence based on the accretion of their labor. Labor used to be a word that could be tied to abstraction. It was in the early twentieth century when[…..]